Andrew Newland’s fifty-eight comments

  • Re: Anthony Frawley’s

    On the album 'The wind in the reeds' by Tommy Keane and Jacqueline McCarthy (1995) they say that they learnt the tune from a recording by fiddle player Patrick Kelly from Cree, Co. Clare. According to Wikipedia Patrick Kelly lived from 1905 to 1976. more…

  • Beinn Eadarra

    The Anglicised version of the name of the mountain (as shown on the Ordnance Survey map) should read Beinn Edra. more…

  • Beinn Eadarra

    The Gaelic singer Darren Maclean has written words using a simplified version of this melody to create a piece of rhythmic 'port à beul' (mouth music). more…

  • An Droichead, X:3

    This is based on the above versions but I have written out the whole piece to show the slight differences on the second time through the tune, and also how the piece returns to the first part to finish. more…

  • Mom’s Jig, X:10

    This is Jerry Holland's version of the tune but showing alternatives to the notes below D in the third part for the benefit of flute and whistle players. more…

  • Long Island Waltz

    This lovely waltz is a composition of Daibhidh R. MacIllinnein from the Scottish group 'Meantime'. It is to be found on their CD 'The Blue Men of the Minch', published in 2004 (catalogue Number WWCB002). The Outer Hebrides or Western Isles of Scotland are... more…

  • Mrs. Galvin’s, X:3

    This setting comes from concertina player Caitlín Nic Gabhann. The tune is from Mrs. Nell Galvin, born Ellen McCarthy near Kilmihill, Co. Clare in 1887. Nell was taught to play tunes on both fiddle and concertina by the blind piper Garret Barry from Ina... more…

  • Re: An Drochaid Chliùiteach

    Surely the name should be written as 'An Drochaid Chliùiteach'? The 'i' is written before the 't' in 'chliùiteach' because the following vowel is an 'e', the two confirming that the 't' in between is pronounced as a 'slender' 't'. 'Cliùiteach' (famous)... more…

  • Re: Dr Flora MacAulay Of Carradale

    The piping version of this tune with ornamentation is included in the second volume of Allan MacDonald's tunes 'The Moidart Collection II - An Dara Ceud (The Second Hundred)': https://allanmacdonald.com/purchase/ more…

  • Bachelor’s

    From the playing of Stan Chapman on the compilation CD ‘MacKinnon’s Brook’. Paul Cranford states that this is derived from a Scottish pipe tune 'His Royal Highness, The Duke of Rothesay' by J. Abercromby, published in the late 19th century. See http... more…