John Offord’s thirteen comments

  • New Road to Alston

    The tune is in fact a version of Davey-Davey Knick- Knack, which I think is Scottish. more…

  • Lord Hood no more

    The pub has now been demolished and the session has moved to The Star and Garter, Old Woolwich Road, Greenwich. The music has always been mainly English with some beginners, don't expect fast Irish music. more…

  • The Major and other Scottish music

    There are an enormous number of tunes in manuscripts in Scotland and the North of England which are often related to Irish music. Popularity is no certain guide to quality, it is often just a result of certain traditional musicians, who could not read mu... more…

  • Re: History of the Music of Ireland

    Jigs, reels and hornpipes, as we know them entered the Irish repertoire probably in the late 1600's because of the craze for country dancing which had spread from England. The dances were nearly all 16 or 32 bars, that is why nearly all dance tunes are th... more…

  • Wind that Shakes the Barley and the origin of reels

    It is well known, through the notes in O'Neil's, that many Irish reels had their origin in Scotland. This very probably includes this tune. It even turns up in the Browne ms C.1820 from Cumbria. The first comprehensive collection of Irish music was publi... more…

  • Re: The Traditional Music of Cumbria

    Nearly 3,000 tunes have been found in Cumbrian manuscripts, these include jigs from Ireland and reels from Scotland , but much that is unique to the area. The music of especially Northern England is closely related to that of Scotland and Ireland and the... more…

  • Key to the Cellar

    A Caledonian gentleman told me that the song "Come Ye o'er"... is not in fact about a visit to a brothel, but about some Scottish Lairds coming to London after the Act of Union in 1707. The "Kittel Housie" in the song is in fact St James Palace in London... more…

  • Dear Tobacco

    The Lakeland version is not a polka. Polkas came later in the 1840's. It is a type of reel which is found in books from the 1700's. These tunes, with patterns of 4 semi-quavers were only played in Scotland or Northern England. more…

  • Tune Origin

    This must be a version of "Dear Tobacco" in the Charlton Memorial Book. The name might refer to the blockading and therefore shortage of tobacco imports from America during the War of Independence 1775-1782. more…

  • Tune origin

    The Mooncoin jig is a version of the Scotch/Border tune "The Major", which is found in several manuscripts from Cumbria and Northumberland. One version from Cumbria dated 1748 has 22 parts. It must have originally been for pipes and it sounds as if it i... more…