Bill McMellon’s thirteen comments

  • Re: Put Me In The Big Chest

    Many Thanks, Donald. Of course you're right, and that is what I meant to suggest in the first place. I very much appreciate the references, though. Please could you explain TTA? Another thing that puzzles me abut the tune is that when Dave Swarbrick recor... more…

  • Re: Put Me In The Big Chest

    I've been trying to learn the Hangman's Reel, the Reel du Pendu, when I came across this. It seems to me that the two are related, the Quebecois tune being an ancestor of Miss Cruickshanks (?). Or is it just the opening bar? I'd be interested to see what ... more…

  • Re: Sí Beag Sí Mór

    There are variations to this tune written by Dave Swarbrick and recorded, back in the eighties, on an album called "Close to the Wind". I do not have the technological knowhow to add them here, but I believe that they are well worth searching out. more…

  • They are grace notes.

    I've studied the book. The notes which have confused me are grace-notes, before the Bs and As mentioned. more…

  • The Es in the second half too.

    As above. more…

  • Da Day Dawns

    I've been playing this in recent weeks, having discovered in Haand me doon da fiddle which I recently purchased from Oxfam (online) after several years searching. I don't have the book in front of me as I write. But aren't most of the Bs in this tune flat... more…

  • And as to Langolee…

    If I understand the thing properly, it seems originally to have been composted by Handel, and then used by the Irish for the following (rather risqué) song, which I've taken from Mudcat: more…

  • And then I found a website with the following:

    Traditional Scottish Songs more…

  • Which River Dee?

    There is a Dee in England, one in Wales, and another in Scotland (although perhaps the English and the Welsh one are the same?). I was brought up in Cheltenham, and as far as I'm aware there's no River Dee in the Cotswolds. So where does the tune come fro... more…

  • Under the Old Myrtle Tree

    That's the name of the dance for which the Martlets men use this tune. more…