A Trip To The Lakes: Traditional Cumbrian Tunes

By The Boat Band

  1. A Trip To The Lakes
  2. Carlisle
    Haul Away The Hawser
    Trip To Cartmel
  3. Cumberland
    Kendal
  4. Robinson’s
    Honeymoon
    A Bonny Lass To Marry Me
    The Cumberland
  5. Keswick Bonny Lasses
    Stables’ Grand
  6. The Birds Upon The Tree
  7. Cumberland
    Carlisle Races
  8. Dear Tobacco
    Bonny Cumberland
    King’s No 1
    King’s No 2
  9. Stybarrow Crag
    Iron Legs
    The Calgarth
  10. Corby Castle
  11. Kendal Ghyll
    When I Parted
    Ulverston Volunteers
  12. Westmorland
  13. My Love She’s But A Lassie Yet
    Whitehaven Volunteers
    Through The Wood Spinning
  14. A Trip To Galloway

Four comments

"A Trip to the Lakes: Traditional Cumbrian Tunes" ~ The Boat Band

Harbourtown HARCD 047
Harbourtown Records
http://www.harbourtownrecords.com/047.htm

Rod Stradling’s review ~
http://www.mustrad.org.uk/reviews/boatband.htm

The Living Tradition Review ~ Paul Burgess
http://www.folkmusic.net/htmfiles/webrevs/harcd047.htm

"Greg Stephens has been rooting out and collecting tunes from his native Cumbria for many years. On this recording the Boat Band wear these tunes like a set of well-loved,comfortable old clothes, worn to the perfect fit:just as they should sound"
~ Folk Buzz Magazine

"when i parted"

This tune sounds very like "trip to sligo"
https://thesession.org/tunes/397

Does anyone have any info on it’s migration to/from the Lake District and the name change?

Chris

The Boat Band - "A Trip To The Lakes"

I really like this album - traditional music from the Lake District, some of it tunes originally noted down by c19 fiddler William Irwin. The playing is refreshing without being slack and simple without being at all dull. It is a delight to listen to, though the two (old) songs are a bit weak.

There are some very nice tunes I hadn’t heard before. A polka turns up shared with Sliabh Luachra, and a related article points out that Cumbrian together with Manx fishermen often frequented the Irish coast. (And the west Cumbrian ports were, relatively speaking, more important then than now.)

There is, or has been, great Northern English trad outside Northumbria, and it’s always good to hear more of this.