Scottish Reflections

By Bonnie Rideout

  1. MacDonald Of The Isles March To Harlaw
    Source Of The Spey
    The Periwig
  2. Seal Songs
  3. The Thistle
  4. Dunblane
  5. Unst Bridal March
  6. Lamentation For The Fallen Heroes Of Waterloo
  7. Itchy Fingers
  8. Cró Chinn T-Sáile
  9. The Highland Laddie
  10. The Highland Laddie: Variations
  11. Lament For Limerick
    Lochaber No More
    Irish Lamentation
  12. Gloomy Winter
  13. St. Kilda Air
    Jenny Nettles
    St. Kilda
  14. Minstrel Of MacDonald

Two comments

Scottish Reflections by Bonnie Rideout & Maggie’s Music Artists

This is a new release that features BONNIE RIDEOUT on Scottish fiddle & viola performing Scottish instrumental music featuring Bonnie Rideout & Maggie

Bonnie Rideout’s Scottish Reflections- liner notes

NOTES ON THE MUSIC- here’s the liner notes about the music on this new release. More info: www.maggiesmusic.com

[Track 1] features Bonnie Rideout and the early music ensemble, Hesperus, presenting music from some of the earliest sources of Scottish, English, and Irish traditional folk music. For centuries the fiddle and the pipes have shared repertoire, complementing each other with similar ornamentation and the use of drone notes, as in these three tunes. MacDonald of the Isles is a pipe march, followed by a strathspey, which is the dance form most identified with Scottish traditional music. The Source of the Spey and The Periwig are reels first published in the Captain Simon Fraser Collection (1815). [Track 2] Bonnie joins four-time National Scottish Harp Champion, Sue Richards, on Seal Songs. These haunting melodies are from the Patrick MacDonald Collection (1784). In the Scottish hierarchy of nature, seals are almost equal in rank to humans. The Silkie myths tell of seals taking human form for short visits on land. [Track 3] The Thistle is a brilliant example of 18th century Scottish parlor music written by James Oswald, who was considered a fine composer of traditional Scottish fiddle tunes and also an example of what, in the 21st century, is referred to as