The Reel Of Tulloch- Baroque Music Of Scotland And Ireland

By Chatham Baroque With Chris Norman

  1. Reel Of Tulloch
  2. Oh Mother What Shall I Do
  3. Ettrick Banks
  4. She Rose And Let Me In
  5. Cromlit’s Lilt
  6. Polwarth On The Green
  7. Sonata In Dmaj
  8. Carden’s Welcome
  9. Soavemento
  10. Allegro Moderato
  11. Largo Gratioso
  12. Allegretto Moderato
  13. Rory Dall’s Port
  14. Adagio
  15. Allegro
  16. Largo
  17. Allegro
  18. When She Cam Ben She Bobbit
  19. Mild Mabel Kelly
  20. Daniel Kelly
  21. Castle Kelly
  22. Captain Kelly
  23. Through The Wood, Laddie
  24. Prelude
  25. John Come Kiss Me Now

One comment

"The Reel of Tulloch"

This is a Dorian Recordings release that has been around for a few years. It’s a look at the Scots-Irish musical heritage contemporary to and as influenced by the Baroque music of the continent during an era that saw the popularizing of Scots-Irish traditional, particularly Scots music, among the courts of Europe.

‘Chatham Baroque’ is Julie Andrijeski on violin, Emily Davidson on violin, Patricia Halverson on viola da gamba, Scott Pauley on theorbo & baroque guitar, with Chris Norman guesting on wooden flute.

Here’s a little background to the tracks:

Tracks 2-8 are from ‘A Sonata of Scots Tunes’ by James Oswald, though track 7 is trad. with arr. credited to Geminiani. Track 8 is more often known as ‘O’Carolan’s Welcome’.

Tracks 9-13 are from ‘Serenata No.5 in Dmin’, also by James Oswald. Track 13, ‘Rory Dall’s Port’ is a trad. attributed to James Oswald.

Tracks 14-18 are from ‘Sonata No.5 in Gmaj’ by William McGibbon. Track 18, ‘When she cam ben she bobbit’ was written by McGibbon and McLachan.

Tracks 19-22 are collectively titled ‘The Kelly Set’, and was arr. by Chris Norman.

Tracks 23-24 are collectively titled ‘John Come Kiss Me Now’, and was arr. by Julie Andrijeski. Track 23, ‘Prelude’, was written by Thomas Baltzar. Track 24, ‘John Come Kiss Me Now’ was written by Baltzar and Davis Mell.

I’m wasn’t too impressed with the Serenata and Sonata, but the traditionals, especially ‘The Kelly Set’ were well worth the listen.