The Irish Concertina

By Noel Hill

Added by Stiamh .

Seventeen comments

The Irish Concertina

The links attached by the site to the track listing will lead you to quite a few tunes that have little or nothing to do with those on the record. Among them are the Pigeon on the Gate (which is an older setting in A - NH also plays it on the duet record with Tony Linnane), the Gold Ring (a two-part jig that I don’t recall hearing elsewhere and nothing to do with any of the multipart Gold Rings) and McDermott’s - which inexplicably takes you to that ghastly tune, the Tinker’s Daughter by Vincent Broderick (actually I don’t really mean that, it’s actually one of VB’s better efforts) .

Afterthoughts

Oh yes, and the Lark in the Morning is another tune that I haven’t heard before. Farewell to Ireland is not the four part A tune listed on the site, but a common two-part reel in D that seems to have a plethora of names, including The Flying Column and Austin Tierney’s (as F Gavin calls it) - is it also known as Farewell to Erin? I can’t remember, I think that’s another tune still, also known as the Rising Sun. My brain fails me.

Farewell to Erin and Farewell to Ireland are two different tunes which have been commonly confused. He plays Farewell to Ireland not Erin!
And the Lark in the Morning is a mistake. In actual fact he play the Morning Lark.

The Gold Ring

The link the site attaches to "The Gold Ring" leads to the multi-part Gold Ring in G, which indeed is *not* the tune on the album. NH is actually playing 3 parts of a different four-part tune also called "Gold Ring" but in D. The D tune he’s playing *is* available on this site - just search amongst the various Gold Rings! The recording actually sounds in F#, so’s you can’t play along in D. I’m betting even NH doesn’t really play it in F# on an anglo box! Yow.

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Pigeon on the Gate is a strange version in Am I think.

Key?

What key concertina does he play on this recording????

noel hill’s setting of ‘lark in the morning’

i’m onto the jig ‘lark in the morning’ as recorded by noel hill on ‘the irish concertina’. i see his name under one of the settings here in the mustard, but the music looks (to my untrained eye) like a different tune. in fact, they all do. and then of course hill plays everything in uncommon keys, so that gets in the way.

is anybody here familiar enough with the noel hill setting to tell me if the tune might go by another name somewhere? how many ‘larks in the morning’ are there, anyway? i’m playing it in D because it fits the fingers that way, but i’d really like to find an authoritative reference before i get it too hard-wired.

Re: noel hill’s setting of ‘lark in the morning’

He was probably playing (can’t remember the recording) Garret Barry’s version of the tune which was handed down via Gilbert and Willie Clancy: ~A3 AdB AFA D wasn’t he?

There’s a Joe Cooley version as well that Hill and Tony McMahon recorded on another occasion

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Re: noel hill’s setting of ‘lark in the morning’

hmm, this doesn’t look right either. my ‘ABCs’ will be wrong if i try to write it out and i don’t feel like getting clobbered with that right now, so i’ll just hang on until someone chimes in with knowledge of that specific recording, if ever. thanks though.

…i have a different way of notating tunes that i developed years ago, which i should probably chuck, but i’ve done hundreds of tunes this way and i can’t face transcribing them all. i am taking small steps toward learning the proper form though…

Re: noel hill’s setting of ‘lark in the morning’

I dug the fecking lp out for you now, he plays the Joe Cooley version after the Gold Ring. AFA ~D3 DEF A2 d BGG DGG BAG B

I think he recorded the Garret Barry version as well at some point, my son learnt it off him in class anyway and I have heard Hill play it often as well.

Anyhow there you have it. I have a clip posted , and posted it before:

http://www.box.net/shared/nq2prhsku4

It’s in the middle of it (I forgot the song was in that clip as well)

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Re: noel hill’s setting of ‘lark in the morning’

thanks for your trouble kilfarboy — yes, that’s the tune. so it’s called, here on the mustard, the ‘morning lark’, or it’s Joe Cooley’s setting of ‘lark in the morning’? but either way, the tune is listed in Dmaj, and the clip of Kitty Hayes is in C. sorry for my obtuseness, but i’m trying to get the key nailed down.

or maybe i should just play it the way it falls (which for me is D), since i don’t know anyone else who plays it. thanks again, both of you.

Re: noel hill’s setting of ‘lark in the morning’

The tune is usually in D, Kitty mostly played in C so we took it in C, no big deal to use the flat keys. Martin Hayes and his father recorded it G I think, moving the whole set a string down on the fiddle.

Anyhow, I have never found the tune to have a fitting name (or one I thought fitting or commonly used) of it’s own: it’s either another confusing ‘Lark in the Morning’ or another equally confusing ‘Cooley’s’ (and then either Seamus or Joe are named sometimes). I remember there’s a version in the Johnny Leary book but I just leafed through it and didn’t immediately spot it. Not listed there as a Lark of any kind anyway.

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Re: noel hill’s setting of ‘lark in the morning’

well that’s lucky — i’ll stick with D then. lark or crow, morning or happy hour, it’s still a great little tune, and noel’s concertina really does sound like a trumpet on that one. i’ve stuck it at the end of a set with ‘fig for a kiss’ and ‘kitty lie over’, and i’m feeling pretty good about it.

maybe i’ll call it ‘the old crow at happy hour’. thanks once again.

Re: noel hill’s setting of ‘lark in the morning’

It’s also called The House in the Glen. Recorded by Tulla Ceili Band, Joe Burke/Brian Conway/Felix Dolan, and Mary MacNamara under that title. Played by Sorcha Costelloe on a Comhaltas Live video. A different jig with the same name was recorded by Joe Derrane.

Re: noel hill’s setting of ‘lark in the morning’

that IS a nice setting — amazing how relaxed she sounds after listening to noel’s rendition.

thanks, gary, for the new (to me) name.