The Buck In The Woods jig

Also known as The Buck In The Bog.

There are 4 recordings of a tune by this name.

The Buck In The Woods has been added to 2 tune sets.

The Buck In The Woods has been added to 9 tunebooks.

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Two settings

X: 1
T: The Buck In The Woods
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:A|BGG dGG|cAG FGA|BAG Bcd|cAF G2A|
BGG dGG|cAG FGA|d2e fdB|cAF G2:|
|:B|Add ded|cAG FGA|~d3 ded|cAB c2B|
Add ded|cAG FGA|d2e fdB|cAF G2:|
X: 2
T: The Buck In The Woods
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:A|BGG dGG|cAG FGA|BAG Bcd|cAF G2A|
BGG dGG|cAG FGA|df/g/d g/f/ed|cAF G2:||
|:B|Add ded|cAG FGA|df/g/d ded|cAB c2B|
Add ded|cAG FGA|d2e g/f/ed|cAF G2:||
# Added by JACKB .

Three comments

The Buck in the Woods (jig)

The first part of this jig is almost identical to that of the Humours of Ballingarry: https://thesession.org/tunes/4191 But, obviously not in the second part.

I’ll comment more on this tune later.

Clareification(?)

Can’t wait for the comments on this one! As it stands right now, you appear indeed to have the first part of the "Humours of Ballingarry" connected to a goodly chunk of the second part of "Gander in the Pratie Hole". After a lot of listening to tunes from all over Ireland, I’ve noticed that, for some reason, musicians from Co. Clare have a peculiar habit; they come up with tunes that are essentially two tunes mashed together. I have dubbed this phenomenon "Clareification" (no disrespect intended to any of you Claremen/women out there- the results are often more interesting than the individual tunes that got their parts grafted together!). Only thing I’ve never figured out is how/why this (seemingly) happens more in Clare than anywhere else. But as I said, I just couldn’t wait for your comments, slainte, so…lay it on us, brother!

-Jay

Sorry, Jay. I have been playing the two tunes you mention for a good few years, but this tune is not merely a composite of the two. It comes from reliable sources. I myself have been to several towns in Co. Clare a few times, but I’ve never met a musician with a "peculiar habit of coming up with tunes that are essentially two tunes mashed together" there.

This transcription of the tune is based on Longford / Manchester musicians Peter and Angelina Carberry’s version, but the last two bars of each part come from Jacqueline McCarthy and Tommy Keane’s duet playing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRtlZJrj5Qk


Peter Carberry writes: "This version of the Buck in the Bog was learned from our good friend Tommy Walsh, a flute player from London…."

Tommy Keane is from Wexford but spent years in London, where Jacqueline McCarthy was born and raised. (Well, you can easily tell where Jacqueline is from.)

So, this is essentially the London version of the tune.