Bruach Na Carraige Baine waltz

Also known as Brauch Na Carrige Baine, Brink Of The White Rock, The Brink Of The White Rock, Bruach Na Carraige Bána, Bruach Na Carriage Baine, Bruach Na Carrige Bana, The Edge Of The White Rock.

There are 26 recordings of a tune by this name.

Bruach Na Carraige Baine has been added to 1 tune set.

Bruach Na Carraige Baine has been added to 149 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Four settings

X: 1
T: Bruach Na Carraige Baine
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Cmaj
|:cd|e4de|cg-g2ge|d3e/d/cA|Ge-e2ed|c4dA|GE-E3G|A6|A4:|GA||
c3d/c/AB|cd-d3e|ga-a2ag|e4ed|c3d/c/AB|cd-d3e|a6|g4ge|
f4f2|eg-g2ge|d3e/d/cA|Ge-e2ed|c4dA|GE-E3G|A6|A4||
X: 2
T: Bruach Na Carraige Baine
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Cmaj
cd|"C"e4de|"Cm"c2g3e|"G4(F6)"d3cAd|"C/A(G6)"G2 e3d |"Am"c3dA2|"G4/Em"G3EG2|"F(A)"A6|A4:|z2||
"Am"c4AB|"A/G"c2d2e2|"Dm/F"g3ag2|"E4"e4d2|"Am"c3AB2|"Am/G"c2d2e2|"F"a6|"G"g4e2|
"Dm/F"f4g>f|"Em"e2g2e2|"G4(F6)"d3c Ad|"C/A(G6)"G2e3d | "Am"c3dA2|"G4(Em)"G3EG2|"F(Am)"A6-|"F(Am)"A4||
X: 3
T: Bruach Na Carraige Baine
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|:(de)|f4ef|da-a3f|(e2 d3) B|Af-f2 fe|(d3e) B2|(A3 F) A2|B2 (B4|B4):|Bc||
d4 Bc|de-e3f|a1 b3 a|f4fe|d4 Bc|de-e2 f2|b6|(a5a) f|
g4g2|fa-a2af|e4 dB|Af-f2fe|d3e B2|A3 F A2|B2 (B4|B4)||
X: 4
T: Bruach Na Carraige Baine
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
de|:f4 ef|d2 a3f|e3d Be|A2 f3 e|
d3e B2|A3 F A2|(B6|1 B4) de:|2 B6)||
d4 Bc|d2 e2 f2|a3 b a2|f4 e2|d3 B c2|d2 e2 f2|b6|a4 f2|
g4 a>g|f2 a2 f2|e2 ed Be|A2 f3e|d3e B2|A3 F A2|(B6|B4) de|]

Fifteen comments

Is this to be played as a slow air?

Bruach Na Carraige Baine

yes.
this slow is from
Eamon Cotter - "Traditional Irish Music from County Clare"

Bruach Na Carraige Baine - Translation?

Does anyone know what this title means, and how it is pronounced?

I may have found an answer to my own question - it appears to mean, At the Brink of the White Rocks, or The Edge of the White Rock. Still not sure how to pronounce it though. Also it appears to exist in both the Irish and Scottish traditions - I wonder which came first? Is the title Irish or Scots Gaelic?

Usually done in Bm, BTW…

BruACH na CaRRAYge BAnie

By the shore of the white rocks.

Bruach na Carraige Baine with chords

T:Bruach na Carraige Baine
M:3/4
L:1/8
S:Clannad - Fuaim
R:slow air
Z:gmp
K:C
cd|"C"e4de|"Cm"c2g3e|"G4(F6)"d3cAd|"C/A(G6)"G2 e3d |"Am"c3dA2|"G4/Em"G3EG2|"F(A)"A6|A4:|z2||
"Am"c4AB|"A/G"c2d2e2|"Dm/F"g3ag2|"E4"e4d2|"Am"c3AB2|"Am/G"c2d2e2|"F"a6|"G"g4e2|
"Dm/F"f4g>f|"Em"e2g2e2|"G4(F6)"d3c Ad|"C/A(G6)"G2e3d | "Am"c3dA2|"G4(Em)"G3EG2|"F(Am)"A6-|"F(Am)A4||

Note:
The chords are not from the Clannad recording.
The chords in parentheses are alternative.
A Xm/Y chord is an Xm Chord with Y as root.

Serenity and a day

What a great tune; so serene!
And a great way to give my head a rest after hours of readin’ an’ hummin’ jigs and reels and reels and jigs on this site! (we’d call it a day if we weren’t way into the night now)
THis is Music!

The Brink of the White Rock

George Petrie’s setting of this air was published in 1806 by Francis Holden. Thomas Davis set his "lament for the Milesians’ to it as well. It was printed in the "Spirit of the Nation" in 1846, one year after his death. Joanie Madden does a beautiful job of this song on her "Songs of the Irish Whistle, Vol. 2"

Lyrics

Is thiar cois abhainn
Gan bhréag gan dabht
Tá an ainnir chiúin táis mhánla
Is gur gile ar a com
Na an éala ar an dtonn
Ó bháithis go bonn a bróige,
Is i an stáidbhean i a chráigh mo chroí
Agus d’fhag si m’intinn brónach,
Níl leigheas le fáil agam go brach,
Ó dhiúltaigh mo ghrá geal domhsa

Ó b’fhearr liom fhéin na Eire mhór
Ná saighreas Rí na Spáinne,
Go mbeinnse ‘gus tusa
I lub na finne
I gcoillte s’ i bhfád ónár gcairde,
Ó mise is tusa bheith pósta a ghrá
Le haon-toil athair is máthair,
A mhaighdean óg na milse póg
‘S tú grian na carraige báine

Other info

for thouse still wondering it is pronounced
Air Vroo-ak naw care-iga bawn-aw

This song is from the tiny but now famous Blascaodaí (Blasket Islands) off Corca Dhuibhne in Kerry. The same place we got Amhrán na Phúca from.

It is also the tune, Carolan’s Cup, attributed to O’Carolan but Donal O’Sullivan, in his great work on the bard, says it is not an O’Carolan.

Your man has it bad, judging by the lyrics, after getting dumped by your woman: A mhaighdean óg na milse póg (young maidan of the sweet kisses).

Re: Bruach Na Carraige Baine

great air—I love Macdara Ó Raghallaigh’s version.

Bruach Na Carraige Baine, X:3

In D for the pipes and whistles, rhythm close to a sung version of the air.

Bruach Na Carraige Baine, X:4

Closer to the harp performance of this tune by Clannad, simpler rhythm.