Cluck Old Hen barndance

Cluck Old Hen has been added to 17 tunebooks.

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One setting

1
X: 1
T: Cluck Old Hen
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
D2 G2 B3 c|dBcB A2 A2|D2 F2 A2 (AB)|cABA G2 G2|
D2 G2 (BAB)c|(dBd)c (ABA)F|(DE)FG (AB)AB|cA F2 (G2 G2)|
D2 G2 [G4B4]|[d4g4] A2 A2|D2 F2 A2 A2|BABA G4||
G2 g2 f2 g2|(ef)ge[E4c4]|[E2c2] g2 f2 g2|(ed)BA G3 (A|
B2) g2 f2 g2|(ef)ge[c4E4]|[c2E2] g2 b2 a2|gedB G4||

Fourteen comments

A different Cluck Old Hen

Not the well known Cluck Old Hen, but a nice tune.
North American of course.

ABCs ~ problems with your transcription

Aside from the duplications… You might want to clean it up before Jeremy shows, our webmaster, and the process of conversion to dots happens…

There are also some good resources for ABC notation available online:

http://www.lesession.co.uk/abc/abc_notation.htm

http://abcnotation.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABC_notation

The general convention for 4/4, and not just on this site, is L: 1/8 ~ not L: 1/4… You also don’t need the repetitions of X, T, K M & L…. I haven’t yet played through your notes…

X: 1
T: Cluck Old Hen
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: barndance
K: Gmaj
| D2 G2 B3 c | dBcB A2 A2 | D2 F2 A2 (AB) | cABA G2 G2 |
D2 G2 (BAB)c | (dBd)c (ABA)F | (DE)FG (AB)AB | cA F2 (G2 G2) |
D2 G2 [G4B4] |[d4g4] A2 A2 | D2 F2 A2 A2 | BABA G4 ||
G2 g2 f2 g2 | (ef)ge [E4c4] | [E2c2] g2 f2 g2 | (ed)BA G3 (A |
B2) g2 f2 g2 | (ef)ge [c4E4] | [c2E2] g2 b2 a2 | gedB G4 |]

L: 1/4 ~ Alternatively if this is the way you want it you could use M: 2/4 & L: 1/8

| DG B>c | d/B/c/B/ AA | DF A(A/B/) | c/A/B/A/ GG |
DG (B/A/B/)c/ | (d/B/d/)c/ (A/B/A/)F/ | (D/E/)F/G/ (A/B/)A/B/ | c/A/F (GG) |
DG [G2B2] |[d2g2] AA | DF AA | B/A/B/A/ G2 ||
Gg fg | (e/f/)g/e/ [E2c2] | [Ec]g fg | (e/d/)B/A/ G>(A |
B)g fg | (e/f/)g/e/ [c2E2] | [cE]g b a | g/e/d/B/ G2 |]

4 bar lines/phrases are also common good practice whatever the type of notation…

Where’d you pick it up from? Is there a recording?

Thanks for that. I think it’s alright now.
We play it in our session. I have not heard a recording, but I’d be interested to hear how others might play it.

I got the notes from the Claire Milliner, Walt Koken tunebook on the web.
They do have a CD which includes this tune

Add the link! Others will also find it useful…

That’s the other version - different tune.

Here is a useful link
http://www.banjohangout.org/archive/207077

There are links to 2 different MP3 files of this tune on that web page. Both played very gently. We tend to play the tune more exuberantly🙂

|: ~ :|

Thanks, I enjoyed that, however, and I had suspected this, other minor differences aside, the parts repeat…

|| ~ ||

But ~ only on the first MP3 example. In the banjo one they are as given, without repeating… 😉

HOT DAMN! ~ the first one is an old and valued acquaintance, one of the Canote, Greg, lovely folk and grand musicians too… Sigh!

Thank you for the link to that ear full of fine fiddling. Sadly we’ve no recordings of the Canotes what so ever, only good memories…

|: ~ B part ~ :|

As Greg’s bow has it… And damn nice it is… 🙂

Glad you enjoyed that.
I had another listen to the recording by Greg Canote.
I agree - it is really nice playing.
I wasn’t familiar with the Canotes, so went to their website and downloaded ‘Dogs in the Dishes’ - great stuff.
Not on the thesession, yet🙂

They aren’t only great musicians, they are fine folk all around, or should I say ‘all around fine folk’. 😉

I look forward to your next transcription…

North American? This tune is part of a family which has a wide currency (or rather ‘had’: it’s perhaps too clichéed to deserve to be played any longer..) A countless irritating French ditties, for example, have a contour that matches at least part of this tune, viz:

http://www.vitrifolk.be/partitions/partitions-france-Trois_coups_de_talons.png

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cinc-sous-par-la-chambriera/dp/B003HU386S/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1334327840&sr=8-1-fkmr0