In And Out The Windows polka

Also known as Early In The Morning, Geordie’s Penker, Go In And Out Of The Windows, Go In And Out The Window, Go Round And Round The Valley, Goin’ In And Out The Window, Going In And Out The Window, In And Out The Window, Maid Of The Mountain, Maid Of The Mountain Glen, Mary From The Mountain Glen, Mary Of The Mountain Glen, My Mother Said I Never Should Play With The Gypsies In The Wood, My Mother Said I Never Should, Play With The Gypsies In The Wood, Wee Johnny’s Lost His Marble.

There are 3 recordings of this tune.

In And Out The Windows has been added to 14 tunebooks.

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Seven settings

1
X: 1
T: In And Out The Windows
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
ce A>c|cB B>B|Bd G>B|BA AA/B/|
ce A>c|cB B>B|Bd G>B|BA AA/B/|
cc B>A|G B2 B/c/|dd c>B|A c2 c/d/|
ee a>g|g f2 f|e>e dG|A4||
2
X: 2
T: In And Out The Windows
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
|: B/ |ce AB | cB- B>A | Bd GB | BA- A>B |
cE AB | cB- B>A | Bd GB | BA- A3/ :|
|: B/ |c>c BA | GB- B>c | d>d cB | Ac- c>d |
e2 a2 | gf- fg/f/ | ee d/c/B/G/ | A2- A3/ :|
3
X: 3
T: In And Out The Windows
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: G |D>G B>c | BA z A | D>F A>B | AG z B |
D>G B>c | BA z A | dd cA | G2 z :|
4
X: 4
T: In And Out The Windows
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: A |Bd G>A | BA- AA/G/ | Ac F>A | AG GG/A/ |
B/c/d GG/A/ | BA A>^G | A/B/c FA | G2- G :|
A |Bc/B/ AG | FA- A>B | c>d/c/ BA | GB B/^A/B/c/ |
de/d/ cB | Ac cA/B/ | c>c BA | G2- G>A |
BB AG | FA A/^G/A/B/ | c>d/c/ c/B/A | G2 G/A/B/c/ |
d^c/d/ gb/d/ | fe eg/e/ | de/d/ c/B/A | G2- G |]
5
X: 5
T: In And Out The Windows
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Fmaj
(A |CF A>B | AG- G)(G | CE G>A | GF- F) ||
(A |CF A>B | AG- G)(A | cc B>G | F2- F) |]
6
X: 6
T: In And Out The Windows
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G |DG B>c | BA z A | DF A>B | AG z G |
DG B>c | BA z z/ A/ | dd cA | G3 |]
7
X: 7
T: In And Out The Windows
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Fmaj
A |CF A>B | AG z G | CE G>A | GF z ||
A |CF A>B | AG z G | c>c BG | F3 |]

Thirty-one comments

Filling a gap …

I spotted this (hitherto unposted) tune listed in one of the recordings submitted by session member ceolachan, and thought: "I know that one!" So here it is.

A simple little tune, and (if my memory serves me correctly) it is used for some kind of children’s folk dance.

Not entirely sure about the key, but as I learnt it many years ago in AMaj, that’s how I’ve posted it.

Well? You do know there’s lyrics don’t you? πŸ˜€

You’ll need to cut and past that first link as from the hash at the end it hasn’t converted to the full link…

"Go In and Out the Window"

X: 2
T: In And Out The Windows
S: Scan Tester - concertina
S: "The Voice of the People Volume 9: Rig-a-jig-jig" - track 7
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
R: polka
K: Amaj
|: B/ |\
ce AB | cB- B>A | Bd GB | BA- A>B |
cE AB | cB- B>A | Bd GB | BA- A3/ :|
|: B/ |\
c>c BA | GB- B>c | d>d cB | Ac- c>d |
e2 a2 | gf- fg/f/ | ee d/c/B/G/ | A2- A3/ :|

"Going In and Out The Window" ~ for comparison

X: 3
T: Goin’ In an’ Out The Window
T: Going In and Out The Window
S: http://thelibrary.org/lochist/periodicals/bittersweet/fa78j.htm
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: playparty game
K: GMaj
|: G2 |\
D3 G B3 c | B2 A2 z2 A2 | D3 F A3 B | A2 G2 z2 B2 |
D3 G B3 c | B2 A2 z2 A2 | d2 d2 c2 A2 | G4 z2 :|
M: 2/4
|: G |\
D>G B>c | BA z A | D>F A>B | AG z B |
D>G B>c | BA z A | dd cA | G2 z :|

I’ve got some old playparty books somewhere in this house. I’ll have to pull them out and see what the transcriptions are like… πŸ˜‰

@Weejie;@Ceol

Quite a wealth of info on such a simple tune! πŸ™‚

Interesting to note the various versions of it …

And my memory did serve me correctly when I said that it was used for some kind of children’s folk dance …

And it’s just occurred to me that the tune is used for a rugby song as well …

Can’t post the lyrics here though - even if I could remember them - even if I ever knew them in the first place, that is … πŸ˜‰

"Go In and Out the Window" - Scan Tester

I missed something in the cut-and-paste, that Scan played it first AB, and then AABB-AABB…

Oh yeah, and that I prefer it in G. πŸ˜€

Oops! I meant C… 😎

"Going In and Out The Window" ~ in G & a second ending πŸ˜‰

X: 4
T: Going In And Out The Window
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
R: polka
K: GMaj
|: A |\
Bd G>A | BA- AA/G/ | Ac F>A | AG GG/A/ |
B/c/d GG/A/ | BA A>^G | A/B/c FA | G2- G :|
A |\
Bc/B/ AG | FA- A>B | c>d/c/ BA | GB B/^A/B/c/ |
de/d/ cB | Ac cA/B/ | c>c BA | G2- G>A |
BB AG | FA A/^G/A/B/ | c>d/c/ c/B/A | G2 G/A/B/c/ |
d^c/d/ gb/d/ | fe eg/e/ | de/d/ c/B/A | G2- G |]

Early in the Morning

The tune is also used for the song: "Early in the Morning"

When I was young, I had no sense,
I bought a fiddle for fifteen pence;
And the only tune that I could play,
Was "Over the Hills, and Far Away"

So early in the morning,
So early in the morning,
So early in the morning,
Before the break of day.

William Brown

There’s also the cautionary tale about the dangers of overproduction composed for the Independent Labour Party in the early C20th which starts:

A right young lad was William Brown,
He worked at a lathe in a Yorkshire town;
He turned that wheel from left to right,
From eight at morning till six at night.
CHORUS:
Now keep that wheel a turning
Keep that wheel a turning
Keep that wheel a turning
And do a little more each day.

Too many verses to quote but the upshot was that poor WB produced more than his boss could sell and ended up out of a job.

"Hullabaloo and Other Singing Games" - Richard Chase

Houghton Mifflin Co., 1949

Dover edition - 1967 as -
"Singing Games and Playparty Games"

Page 14: "In and Out the Windows"

X: 5
T: In And Out The Windows
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: playparty
K: FMaj
(A2 |\
C2 F2 A3 B | A2 G4) (G2 | C2 E2 G3 A | G2 F4) ||
(A2 |\
C2 F2 A3 B | A2 G4) (A2 | c2 c2 B3 G | F6) |]


1. ) We’re march-ing ‘round the le-vee, we’re march-ing ‘round the le’vee,
we’re march-ing ‘round the le’vee, for we have gained the day.

2. ) Go in and out the windows, go in and out the windows,
go in and out the windows, for we have gained the day.

3. ) Go up and down the ladder, go up and down the ladder,
go up and down the ladder, for we have gained the day.

4. ) Go forth and face your lover, go forth and face your lover,
go forth and face your lover, for we have gained the day.

5. ) I kneel because I love you, I kneel because I love you,
I kneel because I love you, for we have gained the day.

6. ) I measure my love to show you, I measure my love to show you,
I measure my love to show you, for we have gained the day.

7. ) Good bye, I hate to leave you, good bye, I hate to leave you,
good bye, I hate to leave you, for we have gained the day.

8. ) I’m coming back to see you, I’m coming back to see you,
I’m coming back to see you, for we have gained the day.

"Games and Songs of American Children"

Collected and compared by William Wells Newell
Harper & Brothers, 1883


Page 128, No. 63


X: 6
T: Go Round and Round the Valley
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: playparty
K: GMaj
G2 |\
D2 G2 B3 c | B2 A2 z2 A2 | D2 F2 A3 B | A2 G2 z2 G2 |
D2 G2 B3 c | B2 A2 z2 z A | d2 d2 c2 A2 | G6 |]



1. ) Go round and round the valley, go round and round the valley,
go round and round the valley, as we are all so gay.

2. ) Go in and out of the windows, go in and out of the windows,
go in and out of the windows, as we are all so gay.

3. ) Go back and face your lover, go back and face your lover,
go back and face your lover, as we are all so gay.

4. ) Such love have I to show you, Such love have I to show you,
Such love have I to show you, as we are all so gay.

Pages 128 - 129 - with some editing and adjustment…

Formation: a ring/circle of dancers with clasped hands, all singing ~ one person outside the circle ~

1. ) The solo person circles around the outside of the rest, all singing the first verse.

2. ) Those in the circle can either let go of hands or raise them as the solo person now weaves in and out of the circle, while all sing the second verse.

3. ) The solo person chooses someone from the circle and goes to stand in front of them, facing each other, all letting go hands, and all sing the 3rd verse.

4. ) The two children take hands and the solo salutes them, a slight not or bow.

The two children exchange places as the original solo joins the rest while the selected child now becomes the new solo and it all begins again…

"Handy Play Party Book" ~ Lynn Rohrbough, 1940

Page 54: In and Out the Window

X: 7
T: In And Out The Windows
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: playparty
K: FMaj
A2 |\
C2 F2 A3 B | A2 G2 z2 G2 | C2 E2 G3 A | G2 F2 z2 ||
A2 |\
C2 F2 A3 B | A2 G2 z2 G2 | c3 c B2 G2 | F6 |]

1. ) Go in and out the win-dows (x 3)
As we have done be-fore.

2. ) Go forth and face your lover (x 3)
As we have done be-fore.

3. ) I kneel because I love you (x 3)
As we have done be-fore.

4. ) I measure my love to show you (x 3)
As we have done be-fore.

5. ) I’d break my neck to kiss you (x 3) (or - One kiss and then I leave you)
As we have done be-fore.

6. ) I take my love to London town (x 3)
As we have done be-fore.

FORMATION: Circle of boys and girls, facing the center, with hand joined. (One sixth of group inside.)

ACTIONS:

(1) As the singing begins, the circle moves to the left and the players in the center individually go in and out und the clasped hands, during the first verse.

(2) On the second verse the inside players each choose a partner and face them in the circle.

(3) On third verse they kneel before them.

(4) Indicate the measure of their love by stretching out arms or measuring a distance between fingers.

(5) The fifth verse may or may not be real.

(6) On the last verse, the one inside takes the new partner and both skip around in the circle to starting point, when the one chosen stays inside the game begins over again.

—- J. Haynes Miller, Fayetteville, West Virginia, U.S.A.

"Hullabaloo and Other Singing Games" - Richard Chase - 1948

Pages 14 & 15 ~ the movements / actions…

Formation: A single ring for any number. Hands joined. One player alone in the center.

Step: A quiet walk for verses 1, 7, and 8. The ring stands still for the other verses.

Actions:

1. ) The ring circles left, clockwise. All stop at the end of this verse and face the center.

2. ) The players in the ring, keeping hands joined, raise arches. The player in the center winds in and out of a few of these windows.

3. ) Center player goes in a straight line as far as they can go within the ring, turns to his right and goes toward the other side wher ethey turn right again. They keep on going up and down until this verse ends. (I’ve replaced ‘he’ with ‘they’, intending asexual and singular, one person.)

4. ) All in the ring now let go hands. The one inside goes and stands in frong of one of the players in the ring, and …

5. ) … kneels in front of the ‘lover’. Then …

6. ) … places their palms together and gradually move hands farther and father apart, measuring more and more until his arms are wide in full measure at the end of the verse. Sometimes they will go backward and measure less and less just to tease, but will quickly widen out again in full measure just as the verse ends.

7. ) Center player stands up, and the ring moves left, taking the lover away. The center player stands still exactly where they were.

8. ) The ring moves to the right, bringing the ‘lover’ back again.

The ‘lover’ comes from the ring and joins the other player in the center. The second round there are two inside the ring. The third time there are four center players. And thus the game continues until everybody has been chosen and there is no ring left.

Notes: The dictionary says that ‘levee’ means a morning reception or ball. It seems tha this was a fairly common function in the middle of the 19th centrury, and I have wondered if there was some famous levee given to celebrate a victory when one side or the other , 1861-1895, ‘gained the day’.

"Go ‘round and ‘round the valley", and "Go ‘round and ‘round the village", are other first verses. Another way to sing the fourth line is "As we have done before."

Lady Gomme thinks that maybe this going ‘round and ‘round the village and going in and out the windows might have something to do with old processional dances that were done through the streets, and in the front door and out the back door of homes, to bring Spring in again. This kind of ceremonial procession is still held at Helston in Cornwall on the west coast of England. Lady Gomme thinks that the words "as we have done before" are a rather sure sign that this game ispart of that tradition.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Gomme

Wee Johnny lost his marble

(it fell doon the cundy) AKA Geordie’s Penker, etc…
(only the second part of the tune is used here)

There was already a lengthy list of titles when I added the two aforementioned names, it probably has grown lengthier since…

I heard ‘Wee Johnny’ on the CD; Chokit On A Tattie, the 22nd vol. of the Scottish Tradition series by Greentrax… It’s the last track on the record and it’s genuinely funny to hear since it’s sung by mother and child.
It’s my second favourite song in this collection, right behind When Suzie was a Baby, which is a masterpiece few songs can equal!

If you like ‘nursery’ rhymes with a Scottish accent, I warmly recommand this album.

Nice one… πŸ™‚

In And Out The Windows

This was a popular children’s song in Dundee to the same tune:

Eh’ll tell the boabie, Eh’ll tell the boabie,
Eh’ll tell the boabie, if you lay a hand on me.
Sixty days in the clink shop, sixty days in the clink shop,
Sixty days in the clink shop, if you lay a hand on me.

In and Out the Windows

I came across these words to the tune called "The Knocker Up" from the mill towns.

A pal of mine once said to me
Knock me up at half past three.
And so prompt at half past one
I knocked him up and said,"O John,
I’ve just come round to tell you,
I’ve just come round to tell you,
I’ve just come round to tell you,
You’ve two more hours to sleep!!"

In And Out The Windows - bawdy drinking song

"Good Ship Venus", also known as "Friggin’ in the Riggin’", is a bawdy drinking song devised to shock with ever increasingly lewd and debauched sexual descriptions of the eponymous ship’s loose-moraled crew. The tune usually used (especially for the chorus) is "In and Out the Windows".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Ship_Venus

Warning, not for Puritans or young children:
http://www.shantynet.com/lyrics/good-ship-venus-sea-porn-be-warned-dirty-lyrics/