Arthur McBride jig

There are 22 recordings of a tune by this name.

Arthur McBride has been added to 1 tune set.

Arthur McBride has been added to 39 tunebooks.

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Three settings

X: 1
T: Arthur McBride
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
D | GAG GDE | GAG GAB | cec BdB | ABG E2D |
GDE GDE | GAG Bcd |edc B{c/B/}AG | ~A3 {G/A/}G2 ||
A/B/ | c2c cde | edd d2B | cdc BdB |ABG E D>D |
GDD EDD | GAG Bcd | edc B{c/B/}AG | ~A3 G2 ||
X: 2
T: Arthur McBride
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
M:3/4
L:1/4
G| G3/2 A/2 G| G D E| G3/2 A/2 G| B2 d/2d/2|
w:I had a first cou-sin called Ar-thur Mc-Bride, he and
e d c| B z B| A >BA| E2 G|
w: I took a stroll down by the- sea-side a
G D G| G D E| G A G| B2 d|
w: see-king good for-tune and what migh be-tide T'was
d c B| A3/2 B/2 d| e3| d2 B|
w:just as the day was a-dawn-ing Then
| d2 d| B c d| e e e| d2 B|
w: af-ter rest-ing we both took a tramp, we
c d c| B c B| A BA/2-G/2|E2G|
w: met ser-geant Har-per and cor por-ra-al Cramp be-
GD G| G3/2 D/2 G| G A G| B> d d/ d/|
w:side the wee drum-mer who beat up for camp with his a
d cB| A EF| F G2|-G3|
w:row- de-dow-dow in the mor-ning
X: 3
T: Arthur McBride
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:GAG GDE | GAG B2d | edc BdB | ABG E2D |
GAG GDE | GAG Bcd |edc Bcd |e3 d2B ||
|:d2B Bcd | edd d2B | cdc BdB |ABG E2D |
GAG GDE | GAG B2d | dcB AEF | G3 G3 ||
# Added by JACKB .

Twelve comments

S:Stanford/Petrie (1905), No. 846
Z:AK/Fiddler’s Companion

“Arthur Mcbride”

X: 2
T: Arthur Mcbride
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
R: jig
K: Gmaj
|: D |\
GAG GDE | GAG GAB | cec BdB | ABG E2 D |
GDE G2 D | GAG GB/c/d | edc B/c/dG | AGF G2 :|
|: B |\
c2 G cde | ed^c d2 B | cdc B/c/dG | ABG E2 D |
GD/D/D ED/D/D | GAG Bcd | edc BAG | A3 G2 :|

C - what is your source: Planxty?

Nope! But it would be nice to see someone add a transcription of their take on it… 😉

S: It’s a nice melody and that’s just some of the ways I find myself playing it… It goes back that far I’ve not a clue where I picked it up from originally, though I did also used to sing it too.

Lyric

Hello,

Can’t find any lyrics of the song in this session site.
Like some help please.
Thanks,

Ruud

Ps

..of course, Paul Brady’s version is not the same as Andy Irvine’s "Planxty" version, but then neither is the tune posted above by the OP.

Posted by .

Re: Arthur Mcbride

1. I once knew a fellow called Arthur McBride
And his pleasure was walking down by the seaside,
A-walking, a-talking, a-viewing the tide
Though the weather was pleasant and charming.

2. So gay and so gallant we went on our tramp,
We met Sergeant Harper and Corporal Gramp
And the bonny little drummer who roused up the camp
With his row-dee-dow-dow in the morning

3. “What ho, my good fellows,” the sergeant did cry,
“The same to you, sergeant,” we made to reply.
There was nothing more said and we made to pass by
All on that bright summer’s morning.

4. “What ho, my good fellows, if you would enlist,
Ten guineas in gold I would slap in your fist
And a crown in the bargain to kick up the dust
And to drink the King’s health in the morning.”

5. “Oh no, my good sergeant, we are not for sale,
Though we’re fond of our country, your bribes won’t avail.
Though we’re fond of our country, we care not to sail,
For we are the boys of the morning.

6. If you insult me without any word
I swear by the devil we’ll draw out our swords
And run thro’ your bodies as strength me affords
And leave you to die without warnin’."

7. “And it’s no good you bragging to me of your clothes
For you’ve only the lend of them as I suppose.
And you dare say nothing for you well knows
That you would get flogged in the morning!” ]

8. “If you would insult me without any word,
I swear, by my king, I would draw my broadsword
And I’d run through your body as strength my affords
Ere you could breathe out the morning.”

9. Oh we laid the little drummer as flat as a shoe,
We made a football of his row-dee-dow-doo.
The sergeant, the corporal, we knocked out the two
For we were the boys of the morning.

10. And as for the weapons that hung by their side,
We flung them as far as we could in the tide.
“And the devil go with you,” says Arthur McBride,
“For spoiling our walk in the morning.”

Arthur Mcbride, X:2

This si more or less Planxty’s setting.
In absolute pitch it’s played in E, not G.
Liam O’Flynn (RIP) plays a B flat set.