My Love Is In America strathspey

Also known as My Love Is In America Highland Fling.

There are 2 recordings of a tune by this name.

My Love Is In America has been added to 3 tune sets.

My Love Is In America has been added to 22 tunebooks.

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One setting

X: 1
T: My Love Is In America
R: strathspey
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|: G/ |F>^EF>G A>B=c>A | A<dd>c A<dd>G |\
F2 F>G A>Bc<A | G>BA>G F<DD3/ :|
g/ |f>de>d f2 (3fed | A<dd>c A<dd>g |\
f2 e>d f>de<d | c>A^G>A E<DD>g |
(3fgf e>d (3fed e>d | A<dd>c A2 d>e |\
f>ga>g f>d (3fed | c>A (3A^GA E<DD3/ |]

Nine comments

“My Love Is In America” ~ yes! ~ a highland fling ~ 8-)

Why? Well, it seems that’s how it was transcribed back in 1873 in R.M. Levey’s "The Dance Music of Ireland, Second Collection", on page 6, tune #14. Here’s that transcription from the book, where it is listed as a hornpipe with both parts repeating:


X: 2
T: My Love Is In America
S: "The Dance Music of Ireland, Second Collection", R.M. Levey, 1873, page 6, tune #14
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: listed as a hornpipe
K: Dmaj
|: G |\
FE FG AB cA | Ad dc Ad d2 | FE FG AB cd | cA GA EDD :|
|: g |\
Fd ed Fd ed | Ad dc Ad dg | fd ed fd ed | cA GA ED D2 |
Fd ed Fd ed |Ad dc Ad de | fg ag fd ed | cA GA ED D :|

It seems obvious to me that the B-part shouldn’t repeat, as is usual for a 16 bar highland fling/schottische.

X: 2
T: My Love Is In America
S: "The Dance Music of Ireland, Second Collection", R.M. Levey, 1873, page 6, tune #14
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: highland fling
K: Dmaj
|: G |\
FEFG ABcA | Addc Ad d2 | FEFG ABcd | cAGA EDD :|
g |\
Fded Fded | Addc Addg | fded fded | cAGA ED D2 |
Fded Fded |Addc Adde | fgag fded | cAGA EDD |]

Kerr threw the Salamanca in with the hornpipes. Somewheres or another Breandan Breathnach remarked that "I never heard it played so sluggishly." ;) Shaskeen and Scholar were in the hornpipes in O’Neill’s MOI too. What’s with these reels that begin with ‘S’ getting the dot-and-flag treatment?

Sometimes it works. Curious how mere eighth notes could suggest the urgency of a reel; how does that work? Is it just that we’ve always heard them that way?

Flings quite often jump to single reels, and the melodies tend to work fine both ways. A good tune travels. If one form becomes less common, along with the dances it accompanied, then why sacrafice a good tune when it can do duty with a few simple adjustments into another form? Being very familiar with both the tune and dance forms it’s a kick to find what seems obviously to fit the earlier structure well. This one surprised me, but the structure is there, and it works.

As to which came first, my guess is the highland fling for this melody…

Quite a few flings have also been stretched, because of that classic second ending in the B-part, to double reels, from 16 bars to 32… I still find they work better, on the whole, as either flings or single reels, as 16 bars rather than 32… They are just more fun that way, less repetitive…

A list of all those would be interesting. "Tunes that get around." Sounds a bit salacious!

The ones I know from old records would be the Ewe, Rolling in the Ryegrass. Flanagan Bros, or John McGettigan? Danny O’Donnell recorded Niel Gow’s Wife, O’Neill has that as the Watchmaker in the reels as I recall. "Grey Daylight" in ONMI is Stirling Castle I think. Ryan’s has Smith’s Delight = Kitty’s Wedding, Beaux of Oakhill = B of BH. Seems like you usually have a change of title to go along with the change of form. I noticed the Mason’s Apron in one of Kerr’s books in the hornpipes, under who knows what title.

Just off the top of my head. Documenting all of those would be a bit of a project. Then I can think of the odd recording where it sounds like the musician is playing something as a hornpipe or fling; or maybe they just felt like playing this reel at a put-put pace. Piper Tom Busby did that with the Caledonian; along with his usual barrages of tight piping, and his trademark extra half-a-bar at one point. There’s another curio with these old timers. Irish Undanceable Music!

For a lark, do a search here using just ‘fling’ or ‘highland’ or both together. It’s a work in progress, which has been on hold for sometime now, other distractions, not all pleasant, as you already know Kevin. But I think you’ll have fun, or hope you will…

Thanks for the info. So many Irish reels seem based on Scottish Strathspeys etc. I usually work out the tune by playing them that way then adding the diddles to get a smooth and speedier tempo for dances.

There is a very individual version on Tommy Potts’ The Liffey Banks (1971)

I’d never thought about hislikely influence on Martin Hayes by the way