Portpatrick jig

Also known as The Lass And The Money Is All My Own, Port Patrick.

Portpatrick has been added to 12 tunebooks.

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Five settings

X: 1
T: Portpatrick
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:e|dBG GAB|(3cdc B A2e|dBG GAB|A2B (3cdc e|
dBG GAB|(3cdc B A2D|BdB AcA|BGF G2:|
|:d|ece dBd|ece ~d3|efg dBG|A2B (3cdc e|
def {a}gfe|dcB A2D|BdB AcA|BGF G2:|
X: 2
T: Portpatrick
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
|:f|ecA ABc|d2c B2A|ecA ABc|B2c d2f|
ecA ABc|dcB B2A|cec BdB|A2A A2:|
|:e|fdf ece|fdf ece|fga ecA|B2c d2f|
efg agf|edc B2A|cec BdB|A2A A2:|
|:f|ecA ABc|d2c B2A|ecA ecA|B2c d2f|
ecA ABc|d2c B2A|c/d/ec dBe|cAA A2:|
|:e|fdf ece|fdf ece|fga edc|B2c d2f|
efg agf|edc B2A|c/d/ec dBe|cAA A2:|
X: 3
T: Portpatrick
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
dBG GAB | c/d/cB A2 e | dBG GAB | A2 B c/d/ce |
dBG GAB | c/d/cB A2 D | BdB AcA | BGF G2 :|
ece dBd | ece ~d3 | efg dBG | A2 B c/d/ce |
def gfe | dcB A2 D | BdB AcA | BGF G2 :|
X: 4
T: Portpatrick
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
gec cde | f2 e d2 c | gec cdc | [G2d2] e f2 a |
gec cde | [d2f2] [ce] [G2d2] c | ege fdg | ecc c2 :|
afa geg | afa geg | abc' gfe | [[G2d2] [ce] [d2f2] a |
gab c'ba | gfe d2 c | ege fdg | ecc [C2c2] :|
dBG GAB | c2 B A2 G | dBG GAG | [D2A2] B c2 e |
dBG GAB | [A2c2] [GB] [D2A2] G | BdB cAd | BGG G2 :|
ece dBd | ece dBd | efg dcB | [D2A2] [GB] [A2c2] e |
def gfe | dcB A2 G | BdB cAd | BGG [G,2G2] :|
X: 5
T: Portpatrick
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
ecBA A2 Bc|dcBA B3 f|ecBA A3 A|BABc e3 f|
ecBA A3 Bc|fcBA B2 AB|c2 fa ec B/c/e|{d}c2 BA A2:|
f2 af e2 ce|f2 af e3 e|fefa ecBA|BABc d3 f|
e2 fg agfe|faec B2 AB|c2 af ec B/c/e|c2 BA A2:|
ecA ABc|d2 c B2 A|ecA ABA|B2 c d2 f|
ecA ABc|d2 c B2 A|c/d/ec dBe|cAA A2:|
fdf ece|fdf ece|fga ecA|B2 c d2 f|
efg agf|edc B2 A|c/d/ec dBe|cAA A2:|

Twenty-four comments

Good old-fashioned name eh?! I reckoned it should have been "The Lass And The Money Are…" but there you go. This is a traditional Northumbrian jig, although I think its style is virtually the same as Irish. I like this tune a lot so I thought I’d let you know of its existence.

The Lass and the money is all my own

On paper, this jig does look as though it could be Irish and I have beenn thinking about what makes its Northumbrian. Of course, its the way itis played. Northumbrian playing (on all instruments)is heavily influenced by the staccatto closed-fingered sound of the Northumbrian Smallpipes. Northumbrian playing is very articulated whien compared with other British & Irish traditions and there is space between all the notes.This makes the grace notes very important and they often bring a rater simple tune to life.
Noel Jackson
Angels of the North

I agree. Also Northumbrian and Scottish jigs are sometimes played a bit like 6/8 pipes marches with lots of dotted rhythms, although I prefer to play this one w/o.

The Lass And The Money Is All My Own

I’ve always suspected that this might be originally Scottish, and it looks as though that might be the case. Apparently it appears in highland pipes anthologies, and in one of the earliest Scottish collections it is entitled "Portpatrick". It also appears in Aird’s Airs and Melodies Vol.1 under the title "Port Patrick"; you can find this G major setting at JC’s tunefinder.

If it did originate in Scotland, it came to the northeast of England and entered the Northumbrian tradition fairly early on, and it appears in Vickers (1770) in the key of A. The abc for that setting is below:

K:A
|:f|ecA ABc|d2c B2A|ecA ABc|B2c d2f|
ecA ABc|dcB B2A|cec BdB|A2A A2:|
|:e|fdf ece|fdf ece|fga ecA|B2c d2f|
efg agf|edc B2A|cec BdB|A2A A2:|

This is presumably the setting that was transposed into G and used for the minstrelsy a century later.

I quite like the setting that appears in Abraham Mackintosh’s tunebook from the early 19th century:

K:A
|:f|ecA ABc|d2c B2A|ecA ecA|B2c d2f|
ecA ABc|d2c B2A|c/d/ec dBe|cAA A2:|
|:e|fdf ece|fdf ece|fga edc|B2c d2f|
efg agf|edc B2A|c/d/ec dBe|cAA A2:|

Apparently this tune is or was known under a number of titles, and I’d be interested if anyone here knows it by another name.

Hmmm, when I entered "Port Patrick" in the alternative names section, a recording suddenly appeared. How satisfying. So it seems that this tune isn’t as obscure as I thought…

Portpatrick

I was surprised to find this in O’Neill’s in the key of G under it’s original title.

Port Patrick

Clarsach player Alison Kinnaird, in her 1978 album ‘The Harp Key’ says about this, "Another Rory Dall air, again from Oswald’s Caledonian Pocket Companion, this time with a variation in 6/8 time. The title does not refer to a place. ‘Port’…simply means ‘tune’."

Blind Roderick Morison, or Rory Dall (c1660-1713) was the harper to the MacLeods on the island of Skye. Unfortunately there was another Rory Dall: an Irish harper called Rory Dall O’Cathain who travelled around Scotland in the 17th century, and there is much confusion about which Rory Dall was the source of which tunes. According to Kinnaird, "It is possible that those pieces collected in Perthshire, such as ‘Port Atholl’ or ‘Port Patrick’ were by the Irish Rory Dall, but it does seem likely that the tunes were composed in Scotland, partly because of their titles, and also because most of them are in a ‘Scottish style’."

I don’t have Vol 12 of Oswald’s Pocket Companion, but I don’t think it attributes the tune to either "Blind Rory". It does seem quite likely that the word "port" is from the Gàidhlig (which could mean tune or port, but the former seems more likely). "Gordon" and "Patrick" both have "ports" in the Oswald books (as well as "Atholl" and "Rory Dall"), but that is as far as it goes.
There are ports, in the geographical sense, with those names too, though Port Gordon was founded after the publication of the Oswald books.
The "Scottish style" that Alison suggests is rather subjective.

It’s still open to debate, IMHO.

As for the Geordie title, FARNE :

Title : Lass and the money is all my own

Also known as : Churlish husband ; Cutting at the broom ; Intrepid ; Lucky kitchens reel ; Patties whim ; ….

…Abraham Mackintosh, a Scottish fiddler livng in Newcastle in the early 19th century, recorded the tune under a title nearly identical to this, showing that it was still known locally under this name, perhaps with associated lyrics. (Wm Christie (Aberdeenshire, 1820) also recorded a completely different tune with a similar title.) Otherwise, it occurs in many collections under different names, Portpatrick in James Oswald’s Caledonian Pocket Companion being one of the earliest. It was used as the melody for the local song Sawney Ogilvie’s Duel With His Wife. It also occurs in Highland pipe anthologies.

http://www.asaplive.com/archive/detail.asp?id=R0302902

“Oswald’s Pocket Companion”

I’d love to see an ABC or dots for that transcription, if anyone comes across it…

Here’s a rehash of Mark’s original submission ~
X: 1
T: Portpatrick
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
R: jig
K: Gmaj
|: e |\
dBG GAB | c/d/cB A2 e | dBG GAB | A2 B c/d/ce |
dBG GAB | c/d/cB A2 D | BdB AcA | BGF G2 :|
|: d |\
ece dBd | ece ~d3 | efg dBG | A2 B c/d/ce |
def gfe | dcB A2 D | BdB AcA | BGF G2 :|

“Oswald’s Pocket Companion”

Well, I do have it, so I was going to do a quick transcription, but can I find it? Eventually I went up to the attic and still couldn’t find it (it’s like looking for a needle in a haystack), but I did find an old VHS tape of me playing in a band in the early 1990s which I was sure was lost forever. When I find Oswald, I’ll do you the ABC.

It’s a pocket companion, Nigel. Try looking in an old pocket.

“Portpatrick” ~ from the dots at the end of the link, and transposed for comparison’s sake

http://www.scotmus.com/music/bremner/guitar-collection/012.html

Bremner’s Guitar Collection, 1758 - Robert Bremner’s Instructions for the Guitar; with a Collection of Airs, Songs and Duets fitted for that Instrument (1758) is both an instrumental tutor and a diverse collection of graded pieces for the popular 6-course Baroque guitar (tuned in open C). The introductory tutorial is one the earliest for this instrument, containing handy information about contemporary performance practice. The following 35 graded pieces pedagogically work out from simple song and dance tunes to more complex material, mixing together both Scottish and common British repertoire. This ScotMus.com album is a complete transcription of the Edinburgh 1st edition of 1758.

X: 4
T: Portpatrick
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
R: jig
K: Cmaj
|: a |\
gec cde | f2 e d2 c | gec cdc | [G2d2] e f2 a |
gec cde | [d2f2] [ce] [G2d2] c | ege fdg | ecc c2 :|
|: g |\
afa geg | afa geg | abc’ gfe | [[G2d2] [ce] [d2f2] a |
gab c’ba | gfe d2 c | ege fdg | ecc [C2c2] :|

K: Gmaj
|: e |\
dBG GAB | c2 B A2 G | dBG GAG | [D2A2] B c2 e |
dBG GAB | [A2c2] [GB] [D2A2] G | BdB cAd | BGG G2 :|
|: d |\
ece dBd | ece dBd | efg dcB | [D2A2] [GB] [A2c2] e |
def gfe | dcB A2 G | BdB cAd | BGG [G,2G2] :|

Oswald’s version…

I treated myself. The version from Vol 12 of Oswald’s Pocket Companion:

X: 1
T: Port Patrick
M: C
L: 1/8
R: reel
K: A
f|\
ecBA A2 Bc|dcBA B3 f|ecBA A3 A|BABc e3 f|
ecBA A3 Bc|fcBA B2 AB|c2 fa ec B/c/e|{d}c2 BA A2:|
|:e|\
f2 af e2 ce|f2 af e3 e|fefa ecBA|BABc d3 f|
e2 fg agfe|faec B2 AB|c2 af ec B/c/e|c2 BA A2:|
M:6/8
f|\
ecA ABc|d2 c B2 A|ecA ABA|B2 c d2 f|
ecA ABc|d2 c B2 A|c/d/ec dBe|cAA A2:|
|:e|\
fdf ece|fdf ece|fga ecA|B2 c d2 f|
efg agf|edc B2 A|c/d/ec dBe|cAA A2:|


Some interesting notes accompany Nick Parkes’ facsimile from John Purser:

"Oswald is the first to publish a common time version, but his jigg variation is very close to
Johnson’s “Irish Jigg”. Portpatrick is in the south-west of Scotland and was the main point of
departure for Northern Ireland in former times, and it is probably to the port that the title
refers, rather than to the early tune types known as Ports, although Keith Sanger and Alison
Kinnaird 1992 Appendix D p217, list it as a harp tune. “Annie and Colin” (Book IX) is an
alternative version of the same tune."

Nice one Weejie, so are you going to give the reel take a go and come back and add your take on it later? :-)

A bit flowery for my taste, Ceol. I need to get my harp strung up again, it would suit that.

Port Patrick

I’ve just come across this in a facsimile of a manuscript from the National Library of Scotland (see http://archive.org/details/msbookofscottish00unse), under the name "Lucky Kitchens Reel" ( which weejie mentioned above. The MS is not dated, unfortunately.

X:1010
T:Lucky Kitchens Reel
T:Portpatrick
S:MS, National Library of Scotland
N:http://archive.org/details/msbookofscottish00unse
Z:Nigel Gatherer
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:G
d | dBG GAB | c2B A2G | dBG GAG | A2Bc2e |
dBG GAB | c2B A2G | B/c/dB A/B/cA | G2G G2 :|
d | dBd ece | dBd ece | efg dBG | A2B c2e |
def gfe | dcB A2G | B/c/dB A/B/cA | G2G G2 :|

That’s an interesting manuscript, Nigel. It would be nice to know how old it is indeed.

I recognise that…

The FARNE notes quoted above were written by someone sitting in my chair, and benefitted from the work he’d already done in tracing further concordances of William Vickers’ tunes. All that info and more is in the one-volume 2008 edition Great Northern Tune Book. But then no-one buys books, it’s all online.

But hey, Weejie bought the Oswald CD-ROM, which I also bought, and it’s very good. I don’t think it’s a Gaelic harp piece any more than John Purser does. I do reckon - with no proof - that the 4/4 ‘Slow’ variation is Oswald’s original, an air written to preface the (anonymous?/ traditional?) jig. I think the air is outstanding (beware the typo in bar 4), and often play it myself with the jig to make a short air-jig set.

The Great Northern Tune Book

I have one of the original editions of The Great Northern Tunebook, Matt, and have always benefitted from your research and enterprise. Your work is nothing less than exemplary, and serves as a standard to which we could all aspire.

I’ve also got the Oswald CD-ROM, which is excellent (if I could remember where I put it!), but I continue to buy real books - it’s a weakness. Happy memories of when I was younger, spending hours playing through hundreds, thousands of tunes. A wasted youth? I think not!

Thanks Nigel, I’m likewise an admirer of yours and all the work you’ve made freely available.
The new GNTB is only £15 from efdss.org
http://folkshop.efdss.org/Books+and+Publications/Great+Northern+Tune+Book.html
This means my percentage comes to very little, so please don’t see this as a plea for sales (he lied). But I am interested in people using it, it’s vastly better than the first edition, it benefits from 20 more years sitting in libraries, and it gives a lot of concordances and alternative titles in one place.