Lady Of The Lake barndance

Also known as The Lady Of The Lake Schottische.

Lady Of The Lake has been added to 1 tune set.

Lady Of The Lake has been added to 14 tunebooks.

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Four settings

1
X: 1
T: Lady Of The Lake
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: B,>A, |\
G,>B,D>G B>AG>B | d>BG>A B>AG>B | c>dc>B A>GF>G | A>GF>E (3DED (3CB,A, |
G,>B,D>G B>AG>B | d>BG>A B2 (3GAB | c2 c>B A>GF>E | D>GG>F G2 :|
|: B>c |\
d>cB>d g2 g>B | c>B A2 a2- a>g | f2- f>g f2 e>d | e>dd>^c d2 B>=c |
d>cB>d g>dg>d | c>B A2 a2- a>e | f>ed>B c>AF>D | (3GAG F>A G2 :|
2
X: 2
T: Lady Of The Lake
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: B,A, |\
G,B,DG BAGB | dBGA BAGB | cdcB AGFG | AGFE D/E/D C/B,/A, |
G,B,DG BAGB | dBGA B2 G/A/B | c2 cB AGFE | DGGF G2 :|
|: Bc |\
dcBd g2 gB | cB A2 a3 g | f3 g f2 ed | edd^c d2 B=c |
dcBd gdgd | cB A2 a3 e | fedB cAFD | G/A/G FA G2 :|
3
X: 3
T: Lady Of The Lake
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
D>C |\
B,>DG>A B>AG>B | d>BG>A G2 A>B | c>ec>B A>GF>G | A>GF>E D>CB,>A, |
G,>CE>G B>Dd>B | G>AB>A G2 A>B | c>ec>B A>GF>D | G2 B2 G2 :|
|: B>B |\
d2 G2 g2 B>B | c2 A2 a>ba>g | f>gf>B [f2c2] c>d | e>dd>e d>BG>B |
d>BG>B [g2B2] B2 | c2 A2 [aA]>[bA]a>g | f>ed>B (3cBA F>D | [G2B,2] [G2B,2] [G2B,2] :|
4
X: 4
T: Lady Of The Lake
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: (3[Cc][B,B][A,A] |\
[G,G]>[B,B]D>G B>AG>B | d>BG>A B2 (3GAB | c>dc>B A>GF>G | A>GF>E D2 (3CB,A, |
[G,2G2] D>G B>AG>B | d>BG>F G2 A>B | c2 c>B A>G (3FGA | G2 B2 G2 :|
|: (3ABc |\
d>cB>d g2 g>B | c>B A2 a2- a>g | f2- f>g f>e (3def | e>dd>^c d>=cB>c |
d>c B2 g2- g>B | c>B A2 a2 a>e | f>ed>B c2 (3AFD | (3GAG F2 G2 :|

Fifteen comments

"Lady Of The Lake"

We always played this with the bounce/swing of a hornpipe or barndance. But for those that like it straight, here’s basically the same transcription without the > ~ 😉

X: 1
T: Lady Of The Lake
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: reel
K: GMaj
|: B,A, |\
G,B,DG BAGB | dBGA BAGB | cdcB AGFG | AGFE D/E/D C/B,/A, |
G,B,DG BAGB | dBGA B2 G/A/B | c2 cB AGFE | DGGF G2 :|
|: Bc |\
dcBd g2 gB | cB A2 a3 g | f3 g f2 ed | edd^c d2 B=c |
dcBd gdgd | cB A2 a3 e | fedB cAFD | G/A/G FA G2 :|

"Lady Of The Lake" Xs ?

Yes, there are quite a few tunes that take this for their name…

"Lady Of The Lake" ~ David Kaynor gives it a go - twice

~ after a little speil…

Old Strings - How to Put on New Violin Strings : Introduction: How to Put on New Violin Strings
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJLHOiyX6Cw


New Strings - How to Put on New Violin Strings : Playing Your New Violin Strings
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EpCfQySYuAo



While some ascribe this melody to Henry Reed, a West Virginia fiddler, that it’s actually a composition of his is debatable, though it has been mentioned as in his repertoire but without a name…

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/reed/index.html

The Fiddler’s Companion ~ Andrew Kuntz

LADY OF THE LAKE [5]. ~

Gary Stanton of Fredricksburg, Va., has sleuthed the dissemination of the tune in modern old-time circles, finding that it is originally sourced to two unnamed renderings (one as a schottische, one as a polka) in the key of G recorded and transcribed from the playing of Glen Lyn, Va., fiddler Henry Reed. Alan Jabbour visited Reed in the 1960’s and researched much of his repertoire, teaching it to others. Bertram Levy picked up the tune, still unnamed, from Jabbour when they both lived in Durham, N.C. in the 1960’s and took it with him when he moved to Palo Alto in 1968, teaching it to Marty Somberg around 1970. Somberg was Seattle accordion player Laurie Andres source, who in turn taught it to New Hampshire fiddler Rodney Miller (see recording cited below). Stanton wrote to Jabbour in the course of his research on the tune, and received the reply:
- - - - - - - - - -
Your account of the likely evolution of the "Lady of the Lake" tune
sounds right. I didn’t know about it till I was at the Lady of the Lake
dance camp in northern Idaho, and they asked me (Tommy Thompson was with
me, but not Bertram) to play their theme tune. I responded with a
different "Lady of the Lake" (in A, like Henry Reed’s "Ducks on the
Pond") and they looked quite crestfallen. Then Tommy and I hit on the
unnamed Henry Reed tune in the course of just playing all our old
repertory, and they exclaimed, "That’s it!" The year, by the way, was
about 1990 or 1991… (posted to Fiddle-L, 1/07/2004)
- - - - - - - - - -
Jabbour suspects the name “Lady of the Lake” became attached to the tune either through confusion with “Lady of the Lake [6],” also played in Durham in the 1960’s, or by association as a vehicle for the dance of the same name, as often occurs. Vermont fiddler Pete Sutherland learned the tune from Laurie Andres and also had a part in popularizing the tune, albeit played with a Southern inflection.. Paul Mitchell notes that the melody is the third change of “Ticknor’s Quadrille,” recorded by the Henry Ford Orchestra in the 1926, named for the grandfather of Clayton Perry (the fiddler in the group), whose name was George Ticknor, or Ashtabula, Ohio.

To actually get the links above and explore the recordings and transcriptions you will need to cut and paste those links as you can see that the last parts ~ )) & +)) ~ have not registered here.

The Alan Jabour transcriptions ~ corrected and simplified:

X: 3
T: Unnamed - called a polka
S: Henry Reed
Z: Alan Jabour - tune & transcription #51
T: Lady Of The Lake
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: polka
K: Gmaj
D/C/ |\
B,/D/G/A/ B/A/G/B/ | d/B/G/A/ B/A/G/B/ | c/e/c/B/ A/G/F/G/ | A/G/F/E/ D/C/B,/A,/ |
G,/B,/D/G/ BG | D/B/G/A/ B/A/G | c/e/c/B/ A/G/F/D/ | G[GB,] [GB,] D/C/ |
B,/D/G/[A/D/] B/[A/D/]G/[B/D/] | d/[B/D/]G/[A/D/] B/[A/D/]G/A/4B/4 | c/e/c/B/ A/G/F/G/ | A/G/F/E/ D/C/B,/A,/ |
G,/B,/D/G/ [BD]G | d/B/G/A/ B/A/G | c/d/c/B/ A/G/F/D/ | G2 B2 G2 ||
B/c/ |\
d/B/G/B/ gB | cA [a/A/][b/A/]a/g/ | f/g/f [fc]c | ed/e/ d/B/G/B/ |
d/B/G/B/ gB | cA a/b/a/g/ | f/e/d/B/ B/A/F/D/ | [GB,][GB,] [GB,]B/c/ |
d/B/G/B/ gB | cA a/b/a/g/ | f/g/f [fc][fc] | ed/e/ d/B/G/B/ |
d/B/G/B/ gB | cA a/b/a/g/ | f/e/d/B/ c/A/F/D/ | GG/G/ G/D/ |]

N: Tape missed part of 1st time thru, 2nd time thru complete (transcribed), then ends w. 1st str. unrepeated, w. special ending.

X: 4
T: Unnamed Schottische
S: Henry Reed
Z: Alan Jabour - tune & transcription #55
T: Lady Of The Lake
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: schottische
K: Gmaj
D>C |\
B,>DG>A B>AG>B | d>BG>A G2 A>B | c>ec>B A>GF>G | A>GF>E D>CB,>A, |
G,>CE>G B>Dd>B | G>AB>A G2 A>B | c>ec>B A>GF>D | G2 B2 G2 :|
|: B>B |\
d2 G2 g2 B>B | c2 A2 a>ba>g | f>gf>B [f2c2] c>d | e>dd>e d>BG>B |
d>BG>B [g2B2] B2 | c2 A2 [aA]>[bA]a>g | f>ed>B (3cBA F>D | [G2B,2] [G2B,2] [G2B,2] :|

N: Same tune as #51, but in different time & rhythm. Repeats contain several variations. He faltered & repeated 1/2 measure at letter a).

""The Lady Of The Lake" ~ pulling more of the schottische out of it

X: 5
T: Lady Of The Lake
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: schottische
K: Gmaj
|: (3CB,A, |\
G,>B,D>G B>AG>B | d>BG>A B2 (3GAB | c>dc>B A>GF>G | A>GF>E D2 (3CB,A, |
G,>B,D>G B>AG>B | d>BG>F G2 A>B | c2 c>B A>G (3FGA | G2 B2 G2 :|
|: (3ABc |\
d>cB>d g2 g>B | c>B A2 a2- a>g | f2- f>g f>e (3def | e>dd>^c d>=cB>c |
d>c B2 g2- g>B | c>B A2 a2 a>e | f>ed>B c2 (3AFD | (3GAG F2 G2 :|

D-limited instruments ~

The simplist answer is to just play those low notes up and octave ~

|: (3cBA |\
G2 D>G B2 G>B | ~

M: 2/4 ~ correction to the Alan Jabour polka transcription above 😏

I was distracted, easily done where music is concerned…

This post is fantastic, I’m having a lot of fun with the tune. And the story… Henry Reed’s repertoire was like a spider web. I think "Clinch Mountain Backstep" is attributed to him, also. There are many others. Maybe it’s just their modes but when I hum his tunes I hear Native American music.

I also like it… 😉

This fine thread provides the interesting backstory that goes with the "Which one?" punchline muttered in unision when a fiddler asks if others in the circle would care to give Lady of the Lake a go. I heard both Alan Jabbour and Pete Sutherland play their respective settings in fiddlers’ workshops and concerts at the Florida Folk Festival.