Auld Lang Syne reel

There are 23 recordings of a tune by this name.

Auld Lang Syne has been added to 3 tune sets.

Auld Lang Syne has been added to 41 tunebooks.

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Four settings

X: 1
T: Auld Lang Syne
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
D2 | G3F G2B2 | A3G A2BA |G3G B2d2 | e6 e2 |
d3B B2G2 |A3G A2 BA | G3E E2D2 | G6 ||
e2 | d3B B2G2 | A3G A2e2 | d3B B2d2 |e6 g2 |
d3B B2G2 | A3G A2 BA |G3E E2D2 | G6 |]
X: 2
T: Auld Lang Syne
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
"D" D2 | "G" G3 G "Em" G2 B2 | "Am" A3 G "D" A2 "B7" B>A | "Em" G3 G "G" B2 d2 | "C" e3-e3 |
"C" e2 | "G" d3 B "Em" B2 G2 | "Am" A3 G "D" A2 "B7" B>A | "Em" G3 E "C" E2 "D" D2 | "G" G3-G3 |]
"C" e2 | "G" d3 B "Em" B2 G2 | "Am" A3 G "D" A2 "D7" e2 | "G" d3 B "Em" B2 d2 | "C" e3-e3 |
"C" g2 | "G" d3 B "Em" B2 G2 | "Am" A3 G "D" A2 "B7" B>A | "Em" G3 "C" E E2 "D" D2 | "G" G4-G3 |]
X: 3
T: Auld Lang Syne
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Cmaj
G2 | c3c d2e2 | G3A G2E2 |c3e d2c2 | A6 cA |
G2E2 D2C2 |D2C2 D2E2 | G4 A3G | G6 G2 |
c3c d2e2 | G3A G2E2 |c3e d2c2 | A6 cA |
G2E2 D2C2 |D2C2 D2E2 | G4 A3G | c6 :||
X: 4
T: Auld Lang Syne
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
A2 | d3d e2f2 | A3B A2F2 |d3f e2d2 | B6 dB |
A2F2 E2D2 |E2D2 E2F2 | A4 B3A | A<d d4 :||
# Added by JACKB .

Thirteen comments

Auld Lang Syne

Ah Robbie Burns…

So here are some lyrics:

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

Chorus.-For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne.
We’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint stowp!
And surely I’ll be mine!
And we’ll tak a cup o’kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pou’d the gowans fine;
But we’ve wander’d mony a weary fit,
Sin’ auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We twa hae paidl’d in the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
Sin’ auld lang syne.

CHORUS

And there’s a hand, my trusty fere!
And gie’s a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak a right gude-willie waught,
For auld lang syne.

CHORUS

And more information can of course be found around the interwebs, such as here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auld_Lang_Syne

Skuld’ gammel venskab rejn forgo
og stryges fræ wor mind?
Skuld gammel venskab rejn forgo
med dem daw så læng læng sind?

Omkvæd: De skjønne ungdomsdaw, åja,
di daw så svær å find,
vi’el løwt wor kop så glådle op
for dem daw så læng, læng sind.

Og gi så kuns de glajs en top
og vend en med di’ kaw’,
vi’el ta ino en jenle kop,
for dem swunden gammel daw.

Omkvæd

Vi tow - hwor hår vi rend om kap
i’æ grønn så manne gång,
Men al den trawen verden rundt,
hår nu gjord æ bjenn lidt tång.

Omkvæd

Vi wojed sammel i æ bæk,
fræ gryn, til høns war ind.
Så kam den haw og skil wos ad,
å, hwor er æ læng, læng sind.

Omkvæd

Der er mi hånd, do gamle svend,
ræk øwer og gi mæ dind,
hwor er æ skøn å find en ven,
en håj mist for læng, læng sind.

Omkvæd

Version in Jutland dialect by Jeppe Aakjær, 1927.

Auld Lang Syne, X:2

Well … the melody has already been posted … but here it is with my own chord setting.

Happy New Year, everybody! :-)

Auld Lang Syne, X:3

I heard this as Original tune

Re: Auld Lang Syne

Yes, X:3 is the original tune that Burns put his words to. The more famous tune came later.

Re: Auld Lang Syne

I usually sing "the old tune" in G: quite a big range (that score being in C!) It is now much more widely known and used.
Possibly oddly, most music books have the "usual tune" in F and many bands play it in G: a tad on the high side for some singers: D is my preferred key for singing the better-known version, and our ceilidh band now uses this key. Attributed to William Shields from the NE of England, I believe!.

Re: Auld Lang Syne

P.S. Ignoring its classification as a reel……..! Sometimes done as a dirge!

Re: Auld Lang Syne

Trish: "It is now much more widely known and used…"

[…than it used to be…] rather than […than the "usual tune"…]

Susan: "…X:3 is the original tune that Burns put his words to. The more famous tune came later…"

As you know, the song is much older than Burns, there being noted a broadside version from the 17th Century, and published versions from earlier in the 18th Century - indeed, the melody can be found in Playford’s Original Scotch-Tunes dating from 1700. Burns "took it down from an old man’s singing" and called it "the old song of the olden times". He famously called the air "mediocre," when it was published in The Scots Musical Museum, so when it was printed in Thomson’s collection it was paired with the other tune, and very quickly they became almost inseparable. Burns told the editor of the Scots Musical Museum that three of the five verses he had submitted were old - i.e. traditional - and that he had added two new verses.

Re: Auld Lang Syne

Thanks - the above is very interesting!

Re: Auld Lang Syne

Hmm…

I thought the original tune was already here (in D), but I can’t seem to find it at the moment. In any case the different tunes are, in fact, different tunes and not versions of the same tune; so it may be best if they were entered distinctly, rather than forced together.

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Auld Lang Syne, X:4

Simple but beautiful.

Posted by .

Re: Auld Lang Syne

Sorry JackB, but although you have posted it as being in G maj with a G key sig your notation is in D. (And nae chance o me singing it that high!)