The Road To Ballisadare hornpipe

Also known as Road To Ballisodare, The Road To Ballisodare, Road To Ballysodare, The Road To Ballysodare.

There are 3 recordings of a tune by this name.

The Road To Ballisadare has been added to 5 tunebooks.

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Three settings

X: 1
T: The Road To Ballisadare
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|: F>G |A2 A>B A>GF>G | A>df>d A>GF>G | (3AGA B>F A>FD>F | E>DE>F E2 F>G |
A2 A>B A>GF>G | A>df>d A>GF>G | A>ce>f g>ec>e | (3ded c>e d2 :|
|: c>d |e2 e>f g>ec>e | d>cd>e f>dB>d | g2 (3fgf (3efe (3 ded| (3cdc (3BcB A>GF>G |
A2 A>B A>GF>G | A>df>d A>GF>G | A>ce>f g>ec>e | (3ded c>e d2 :|
X: 2
T: The Road To Ballisadare
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|: F>G |A2- A>B A>G F2 | A>df>d A>GF>G | (3ABA B>F A>FD>F | E>DE>F E4 |
(3AcA A>B A>GF>G | A>df>d A>GF>G | A>cg>e g>ec>e |[1 3ded c>e d2 :|[2 d2- d>c d2 ||
|: c>d |e2- e>f g>ec>e | d>cd>e f>dB>d | g2 f2 e2 d2 | (3cdc B2 B>AF>G |
A2- A>B A>GF>G | A>df>d A>GF>G | A>ce>f g>ec>e |[1 (3ded c>e d2 :|[2 d2 d2 d2 |]
X: 3
T: The Road To Ballisadare
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|: F>G |A2- A>B A>GF>G | a>df>d A>GF>G | (3ABA B>F A>FD>F | E>^DE>F (3EFE (3EFG |
(3AAA B>F A>GF>G | a>df>d A>GF>G | A>ce>f g>ec>e | (3ded c>e d2 :|
|: c>d |e2- e>f g>ec>e | d>cd>e f>dA>f | (3gag f2 (3efe d2 | (3cdc (3BcB B>AF>G |
A2 A>B A>GF>G | a>df>d A>GF>G | A2 (3def g>ec>e | (3ded c>e d2 :|

Three comments

The Road To Ballisadare

From Rose Murphy. Originally played in B major, probably on a B/C accordion.

It’s not too hard in B major on a C/G concertina.

B major version

X: 1
T: The Road To Ballisadare
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Bmaj
|:D>E |\
F2 F>G F>ED>E | F>Bd>B F>ED>E |(3FEF G>D F>DB,>D | C>B,C>D C2 D>E |
F2 F>G F>ED>E | F>Bd>B F>ED>E | F>Ac>d e>cA>c | (3BcB A>c B2 :|
|: A>B |\
c2 c>d e>cA>c | B>AB>c d2 d2 | e2 d2 c2 B2 | (3ABA G2 F>ED>E |
F2 F>G F>ED>E | F>Bd>B F>ED>E | F>Ac>d e>cA>c | (3BcB A>c B2 :|

“The Road To Ballisodare” ~ a pleasure ;-)

Interesting, I’ve been enjoying giving some more time to listening to this recording of Rose Murphy, and playing along. I like her way with things. It is in my ears definitely a single row she’s playing, and if it were a B/C it might be the B row, playing it using the same fingers you’d use for a D or C single row. However, knowing how undependable early recordings are, tending to be sped up and consequently sounding in a higher pitch, for example D to Eb, etc. And not forgetting that alternate tunings for instruments were also quite the norm ~ I’ve had in my hands and possession a few that were sharp, D sounding up a half step/semitone, as Eb, or more… I’ve played around with this recording and tune a little, and either side of it. It is sounding in B Major, two semitones up from A and one down from C. As interesting as B Major might be, I think it’s a fluke, an accident, and wouldn’t be the norm, while C and D single rows weren’t uncommon. Considering the rest of the instruments common to this music, B Major is not a very friendly key. But that never stopped anyone before. There’s nothing played on a single row ~ C, D, or G ~ that couln’t also be played on the B row of a B/C accordion ~ B Major, C Dorian, G minor, etc… :-D

I’ve given an alternate transcription above, with some other possiblities from Rose’s playing. For instance, the 7th row of the A part, which is more often played in agreement with the B-part ~
| A>ce>f g>ec>e | - rather than the variation given - | A>cg>e g>ec>e |