John Of Paris jig

Also known as 95, Jean De Paris, Ninety Five, Ninety-Five.

There are 2 recordings of a tune by this name.

John Of Paris has been added to 4 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Four settings

X: 1
T: John Of Paris
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
dc | B2 B BAB |d2 B BAB | c2 e g2 e | d2 B BAB |
c2 A AGA | B2 G GFG | A2 A A2 G | F2 G Adc |
B2 B BAB | d2 B BAB | c2 e g2 e | d2 B BAB |
c2 A AGA | B2 G G2 F | E2 e d2 c | B2 G G3 |
d2 d def | g2 a b3 | b2 a g2 e | d2 d dBG |
e2 e ecA | d2 d dBG | c2 A B2 G | A2 e d2 c |
B2 B BAB | d2 B BAB | c2 e g2 e | d2 B BAB |
c2 A AGA | B2 G G2 F | E2 e d2 c | B2 G G ||
X: 2
T: John Of Paris
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
d2 c |:B2 B B^AB | d2 B B^AB | c2 e g2 e | d2 B B^AB |
[1 c2 A A^GA | B2 G GFG | A2 E A2 G | F2 d cc/B/A :|
[2 c2 A E2 A | BAG g2 G | c2 e d2 F | G3- GB/c/d ||
g2 d def | g2 a b3 | b2 a g2 e | d2 c Bcd |
e2 e ecA | d2 d dB/A/G | c2 A B2 G | AFD d3 |
B3 B^AB | d2 B B^AB | c2 e g2 e | d2 B B^AB |
c2 A e2 A | BAG g3 | c2 e d2 F | G3 |]
X: 3
T: John Of Paris
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: d/c/ |B2 B BAB | d2 B BAB | c2 e g2 e | d2 B BAB |
c2 A AGA | B2 G GFG | E2 e edc | B2 G G2 :|
|: B/c/ |d2 c Bcd | e2 f g2 a | b2 a gfe | d2 c B2 c |
d2 c Bcd | e2 f g2 a | b2 a gfe | d2 c Bcd |
e2 e ecA | d2 d dBG | c2 A B2 G | FAd d2 :|
X: 4
T: John Of Paris
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
d/c/|:B2 B BAB | d2 B BAB | c2 e g2 e | d2 B BAB | c2 A AGA |
[1 B2 G G2 B | A2 B A2 B | A2 d d2 c :|[2 B2 G G2 F | Eed cBA | B2 G G2 ||
B |d2 c Bcd | e2 f g2 a | b2 a gfe | d2 c Bcd |
e2 e ecA | d2 d dBG | c2 A B2 G | FGF D3 |
B2 B BAB | d2 B BAB | c2 e g2 e | d2 B BAB |
c2 A AGA | B2 G G2 F | Eed cBA | B2 G G2 |]

Nine comments

John Of Paris

A tune that is used almost exclusively for a dance of the same name. When used for this dance, it needs to be taken at a very steady speed, otherwise the dancers won’t be able to keep up.

There are no repeats – the tune is 32 bars in itself, which fits the length of the dance.

Here is a rendering by the Jig Mad Wolf Ceilidh Band:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ahEgMJ7P2cY

S: 2 ~ “John of Paris” ~ ? :-/

Don’t ask Mix, I can only remember playing it this way, and we started it out with a kind of slow intro of something akin to d3 c3 ~ and away we went. We played it very umpty dumpty, lollopping along like a Dr. Seuss creature, was it a Kalufalump? ~ a kind of dancing elephant like thing, or am I getting mixed up with my fantasy creatures? :-D No, not an ‘umpalumpa’, that’s ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and no, I don’t think it’s Horton I’m thinking of. (my wife trying to aid my memory in the background.)

Well, Ceol - I’ve just done a quick trawl on YouTube and found a couple more renderings of the tune:

Melodeon rendering here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DUViUY_vRDw


Banjo rendering here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVQLxuohgck


Both of these seem very similar. So either one has got it from the other, or they both obtained it from the same source.

In any event, these renderings are much closer to my version than to yours - peppered as it is with all those A# accidentals … !

Where did you get it from? Oh - I forgot - you did say: "don’t ask" :-)

X: 3 “John of Paris” ~ the history bit

"Lincolnshire Collections Volume 1: The Joshua Gibbons Manuscript", collected 1823 - 1826,
edited and transcribed by Peter D. Sumner, Breakfast Publications, 1997
ISBN: 0-9530117-0-4

Jigs - page 68, tune #114

X: 4 “John of Paris” ~ a little bit more

An incomplete version of this tune can be found in Michael Raven’s tome, "One Thousand English Country Dance Tunes", his section "Country Dances in 6/8, 9/8 and 3/4 time" - page 100. It finishes at the 8th bar of the B-part of the version given here, in other words ~ B |\ ~ | FGF D2 |]

The version given here, identical up to this point, is finished beyond this point following Peter Kennedy’s transcription from his "The Fiddler’s Tune-Book", originally two volumes, now both in the one volume edition, 1994, page 48, tune #190. I was niggling Peter to let someone do work on crediting all his transcriptions to sources but, sadly, that never came to fruition.

"One Thousand English Country Dance Tunes", 1984/99, Michael Raven
ISBN-10: 0906114314
ISBN-13: 978-0906114315

"The Fiddler’s Tune-Book", 1994, Peter Kennedy
ISBN-10: 1-899512-14-4
ISBN-13: 978-1899512140

I had to balance out my quirky memory of it with a bit of history. Mind you, historical transcription tended to take the safe route and not necessarily the real way things were played, such as falling between the cracks/notes, like those A#s of mine, which I’d have most likely gotten from someone else, but I can’t for the life of me remember where or who. That’s what I get for not reading it off of a sheet. :-D

I enjoyed Lester’s take on it. That’s ‘umpty-dumpty’… ;-)

The dance

Anyone have details of the dance that goes with the tune please?
Noel