Bunclody waltz

Also known as The Streams Of Bunclody.

There are 3 recordings of a tune by this name.

Bunclody has been added to 1 tune set.

Bunclody has been added to 10 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Seven settings

X: 1
T: Bunclody
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Cmaj
E>F | Gc3 dB |cG3 EG | FD3 CB, | C4 B>c | d3G cB |A G3 EF | GE C3E | D4 |
B>c | d4 ed |cB G2 EF | GE C3E | D4 ED| Cc3 dB |cG3 EG | FD3 CB, | C4 |
# Added .
X: 2
T: Bunclody
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
GA | Bg3 af |gd3 Bd | c2 A3F | G4 |: f>g | a2 d2 g>f |e2 d3B | c2 d>B GB | A4 :|GA | Bg3 af |gd3 Bd | c2 A3F | G4|
# Added .
X: 3
T: Bunclody
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
GA | B g3 af | g d3 Bd | c2 A3 F | G4 :|
f>g | a2 d2 g>f | e2 d3B | c2 d>B GB | A4 :|
GA | B g3 af | g d3 Bd | c2 A3 F | G4 |]
X: 4
T: Bunclody
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Cmaj
E>F | Gc3 dB |cG3 EG | FD3 CB, | C4 |
B>c | d3G cB |A G3 EF | GE C3E | D4 |
B>c | d4 ed |cB G2 EF | GE C3E | D4 ED|
Cc3 dB |cG3 EG | FD3 CB, | C4 |]
X: 5
T: Bunclody
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Cmaj
GA | Bg3 af |gd3 Bd | c2 A3F | G4
|: f>g | a2 d2 g>f |e2 d3B | c2 d>B GB | A4 :|
GA | Bg3 af |gd3 Bd | c2 A3F | G4|]
X: 6
T: Bunclody
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Cmaj
GF | Gc3 B2 | cd3 B2 | cG3 F2 | G4
GA | _B4 AG | Bc3 d2 | c4 GE | D4
BA | G4 FG | EC3 DE | F4 GA | D4
cd | e4 dc | BG3 F2 | E4 CC | C4
# Added .
X: 7
T: Bunclody
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Bmin
FG | A2 d2 c2 | dA F2 DF | E3 D C2 | D4 cd | e2 A2 dc |
B2 A2 F2 |G2 A2 F2 | E4 cd | e2 A2 dc | B2 A2 GF |
G2 AF DF | E4 FG |A2 d2 ec | dA F2 DF | E3 D C2 | D4 |]

Four comments

Bunclody

I’m minded to add this song air as there’s a lovely version on a local CD recording that I will add here. Many towns and counties in Ireland have a ballad associated with them, the quality of which ranges from hackneyed dirges to lovely airs. Bunclody is one of the classier songs although maybe I’m biased as we live in the general locality. It’s a song of lost love, a clash of class and emigration.

There are different versions of the song but the first & last verses are usually these:
Oh were I at the Moss House
Where the birds do increase
By the foot of Mount Leinster
Or some silent place
By the streams of Bunclody
Where all pleasures do meet
And all that I ask is
One kiss from you sweet
and
So farewell to my father
And my mother adieu
To my sister and my brother
Farewell unto you
I am bound out for Americay
My fortune to try
When I think on Bunclody
I am ready to die

The original moss houses are gone but there’s still a pub of the same name. It’s usually sung to the air above - I’ve given the bones of the way I normally play it in C but also include a ‘simpler’ version in G. Interestingly it was apparently usually sung locally to a different air, although any time I’ve heard it sung live and on recordings, it’s in the more usual air above. I’ll look up the older air and add in due course.

Posted .

Probably best from a sheet music point of view with the lines broken up into 4s or similar.

Bunclody - an older melody

These days, the first melody above is very definitely associated with the song Bunclody but seemingly it hasn’t always been so. I came across an account by Fr. Séamus de Vál, local historian and retired parish priest of Bunclody in which he investigated the origins of the song. He thinks that the current version came from the book, Irish Street Ballads published in 1939 by Colm Ó Lochlainn of Kilkenny. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colm_%C3%93_Lochlainn

He says that Colm credits the air to his father Domhnall, also a Kilkenny man (note the reference to Kilkenny! for the benefit of overseas readers, think of sporting rivalry etc). Fr de Vál goes on to say that this version was popularised by the Emmet Spiceland band who were very popular in the 1960s and 70s and who sang it at the hurling final in Croke Park in 1968 when Wexford defeated Tipperary. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqoBm9lpEHY


However Fr de Vál says that the local people of Bunclody and district of old had a different air for it. Setting 6 above is a transcription of this. I don’t know if the melody is also associated with other songs, let me know if it is. But this seems the best place to post it as it would be regarded as the old air of Bunclody.

Posted .

Bunclody, X:7

A simple D maj version which was in an Irish songbook.