Reeaghyn Dy Vannin reel

Also known as Manx Dirk Dance.

There is 1 recording of this tune.

Reeaghyn Dy Vannin has been added to 2 tune sets.

Reeaghyn Dy Vannin has been added to 9 tunebooks.

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One setting

1
X: 1
T: Reeaghyn Dy Vannin
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
F |: A4 F3D | E2 E2 G3F | A4 F3D | E2 E2 D3F |
A4 F3D | E2 E2 G3F | A4 F3D |1 E2 E2 D3F :|2 E2 E2 D4 |
|: D2 DD D2 D2 | E2 E2 G3F | A4 F3D | E2 E2 D4 |
D2 DD D2 D2 | E2 E2 G3F | A4 F2 D2 | E2 E2 D4 |
d4 F2 D2 | E2 E2 G4 | d4 F2 D2 | E2 E2 D4 |
d4 F2 D2 | E2 E2 G3F | d4 F2 D2 |1 E2 E2 D4 :|2 E2 E2 D3F |
A4 F3D | E2 E2 G3F | A4 F3D | E2 E2 D3F |
A4 F3D | E2 E2 G3F | A4 F3D | E2 E2 D3 ||

Five comments

Reeaghyn Dy Vannin

Also known as the Manx Dirk Dance. This tune, and the associated dance, were collected by Mona Douglas in the early part of the Twentieth century from Mr. and Mrs. Kermode. Kermode claimed that his family had danced the dirk dance through the centuries for the Kings of Mann. Kermode told Douglas:

"It’s the dance the young Kings of Mann were doing one time, when they would come to be men, and the Druids were teaching it to them. They had to move around the way of the sun, and finish saluting the place of the sun’s rising, to bring light and liberty to the people. It’s all in old history, how the Kings from the North stopped doing the dance themselves and made a Manxman dance it before them at Tynwald, and that’s how the Kermodes first came to be King’s Dancers, and have been ever since, for the name means Mac y Mod, the son of the assembly. But when the old Kings went, the new Lords didn’t regard the dance, and it was left out of Tynwald, but they still had to have the Sword held up before them and face the rising sun, and
the Governor does that in Tynwald to this day." (quoted in Douglas, 1957, Journal of the International Folk Music Council, Vol. 9, pp. 31-33)

Kermode said that the tune was sung port-y-beayll by a female member of the dancer’s family.

Fun tune…

… and a great story/history! Thanks for that!!!

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Hebridean?

I forgot to add that it is also similar to a Hebridean tune, but I don’t know the name. Can anyone help?

This reminds me of "Oran Talaidh an Eich-Uisge" " Lullaby of the Water- horse" which is certainly Hebridean. You can find it on Margaret Stewart and Allan MacDonald’s excellent "Colla mo Run" album. Is this what you were thinking of?

That’s the one! Thank you.