The Caledon Line jig

There are 2 recordings of a tune by this name.

The Caledon Line has been added to 1 tune set.

The Caledon Line has been added to 5 tunebooks.

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One setting

X: 1
T: The Caledon Line
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
E|:"G"DGG GFD|"D"DCA, DCA,|"G"DGG GFD|"D"DCA, "G"G,A,G,|
"G"DGG GFD|"D"DCA, DCA,|"G"DGG GFD|"D"DCA, "G"G,3:||
|:"D"FDD "G"GDD|"D"AGF GFD|"D"FDD "G"GDD|"D"GFD "G"CA,G,|
"D"FDD "G"GDD|"D"AGF GFD|"D"FDD "G"FDG|"D"GFD "G"CA,G,:|
"G"Bcd cBG|DED "D"DEF|"G"GDD "C"ECC|"G"DGG "D"FGA|
Bcd cBG|DED DEF|~G3G GFD|CA,D G,3:|

Three comments

The Caledon Line

This 3-part jig is transcribed from Zoe Conway’s debut CD, with the composer listed as "traditional". It seems quite different from a two-part version previously posted except for having the same A part. No idea which is "correct"….but I really like this version. The harmony is just the simplest possible; the tune could be harmonized in a great many interesting ways. BTW I did a little research on so-called "heavy" (or treble) jigs, but it’s still not clear to me what makes a tune a "heavy jig" (and thus why this tune is one….or is not!). The term seems to originate from a style of dance. So to be a "heavy jig", does a tune have to be one intended to be danced to in that style?

Heavy Jigs

Partial answer to my own question: a "heavy jig" is one danced to in "heavy" shoes, those big thick-soled clumpy-looking numbers that make such a satisfying ker-THUMP when one (who is competent) dances in them. I still wonder what qualifies a jig as "heavy", i.e. whether it is a type of set-dance, with dance and tune paired….?