Alfred På Hultet polka

Also known as Alfred På Hultet’s, Polka Efter Alfred På Hultet, Polka Efter Hector Hansen, Polkett Efter Alfred På Hultet.

Alfred På Hultet has been added to 12 tunebooks.

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One setting

1
X: 1
T: Alfred På Hultet
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
ff f/g/f/e/ | dd F>G | AA BA/G/ | FE E2 |
gg g/f/e/d/ | cc c>B | AA BA/G/ | FA de |
ff f/g/f/e/ | dd F>G | AA BA/G/ | FE E2 |
gg g/f/e/d/ | ca a/b/a/g/ | fg Bc | d2 d2 |]
ff f/d/A/d/ | ff f2 | gg g/d/B/d/ | gg g2 |
aa a/e/c/e/ | aa a/b/a/g/ | fg ea | fd de |
ff f/d/A/d/ | ff f2 | gg g/d/B/d/ | gg g2 |
aa a/e/c/e/ | aa a/b/a/g/ | fg Bc | d2 d2 |]

Five comments

Alfred Pa Hultet’s

This one’s Swedish, and I think that it’s a great tune. My transcription is encoded without repeats – i.e. to make a tune length of 32 bars.

Here’s a recent rendering of it by the Jig Mad Wolf Ceilidh Band …

http://www.jigmadwolf.co.uk

… at a wedding gig.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ixPpcaQm_Y


It’s being played here for a dance called “The Old Swan Gallop” (a dance devised by Dave Hunt, a regular caller with the Old Swan Band).

The other polka in the set is called “The Old Set Tune”.

https://thesession.org/tunes/11360

Polka/polkett/snoa

Slight error in the transcription - the first bar shouldn’t be there.

This tune is from North Bohuslän in Sweden. It’s often called simply "Alfred på Hultet", but it is from the playing of Alfred Olsson (or Johansson according to some sources) of Lommeland, who was known as Alfred på Hultet (Alfred on the Holt [wooded hill - copse or grove] - most likely a local name for a particular location). Therefore a more correct title would be "Polka [or polkett or snoa] efter Alfred på Hultet".
The tune can be, and is used for either a polka, a polkett or a snoa.

@Weejie - thanks for the comprehensive info! 🙂

"the first bar shouldn’t be there".

?? Please clarify! I’ve transcribed it as 32 bars - it can’t be 31 bars, surely?

Your transcription has 33 bars, Mix. The first bar - ff is two quavers and the second bar - f/g/f/e/ is four semiquavers. Those two bars are each one crotchet in length. The tune is 2/4. Remove the first bar line and all is OK.

@Weejie: Corrected now! Sorry that it took me so long to do it (somehow, I must have missed reading your second comment ….).