Horseshoe Bay slip jig

There is 1 recording of a tune by this name.

Horseshoe Bay has been added to 1 tune set.

Horseshoe Bay has been added to 10 tunebooks.

Download ABC

One setting

X: 1
T: Horseshoe Bay
R: slip jig
M: 9/8
L: 1/8
K: Ador
|:ADD ABc BAG|ADD ABA GFG|ADD ABc Bcd|1 edc BcB A2 G:|
|2 edc BcB A2 B||:cBc cde dcB|ABA ABA GAB|cBc cde ged|
|1 eAA ABG A2 B:|2 eAA ABG A2 G||

Eight comments

Horseshoe Bay

I learned this tune at a music camp, but no one had any details about the tune. (This transcription of the tunes is not mine, but some of the amazing musicians there).

A bit of detective work led me to the album An Spealadóir and the fantastic tunes of Bua (www.buamusic.com). I managed to exchange a few emails with the band, and learned that the composer is Brian Miller from St. Paul MN, and he gave me permission to post the tune here.

Brian also told me that he wrote this tune while waiting for the ferry that crosses from Horseshoe Bay, British Columbia (near Vancouver) to Bowen Island to visit his wife’s family.

This is a lovely wee driving tune that is great for finishing of a set of slip jigs with a lot of energy. Thank Brian!

Agreed. It’s a nice slip jig but I think it’s in Ador rather than G major

Thanks Davy, I think you are right, and I have changed it.

Adding Chords to the Sheet Music

It would be very helpful to add the chords to the sheet music. Being all in one it’s easier to play and include most instruments.

Re: Adding Chords to the Sheet Music

Sorry leesmarc, I wish I could add the chords, but to tell you the truth, I don’t know how to figure out what chords to add, I am not very good with chords. Feel free to add an arrangement of the tune with the chords you play.

Seems to me that the a part is Dmix, and the b part mostly Cmaj. Nice tune.

Chords

There are a a number of chord options for this tune. Here is what I would regard as the most ‘obvious’ harmony (Of course, ‘obvious’ is subjective):

D5 _ (G) | D5 _ (C) | D5 _ G | Am (G) Am :|
C _ G | Am _ G | C _ (G) | Am _ _ :|

The bracketed chords are optional changes that could, say, be left out the first time through, then brought in (perhaps not all at once) to add a sense of movement. In fact, any of the bracketed Gs could be changed to an Em, for variation.

Another approach could be to drone on an A5 right through the A-part. There would be a dissonance with the bottom D in the melody, but it could make for a nice bit of drawn-out musical tension. Whilst we’re getting experimental, how about swapping round the C and Am in bars 5-7, then ending on a D5 in bar 8? So, something like this:

A5 _ _ |_ _ _ | _ _ _ | _ _ _ :|
Am _ G | C _ G | A _ Em | D5 _ _ :|

The C in bar 6 forms a strangely jazzy harmony with the melody notes (major 13th?), which might not please all ears. For a completely different feel, you could play a D chord in that place. Another option still would be to play an F there.

I think that just about scratches the surface.

Interesting offerings, Creature, ah, Creadur, that is. I just listened to the Bua recording mentioned above, and lo,
the a and b parts are reversed. Since Brian Miller, the guitarist/bouzoukist is the author, I guess his recording is the definitive version. I don’t have my guitar at hand, but your first set of chords seems to be close to Miller’s conception.