All Covered With Moss jig

Also known as Roger The Weaver.

There is 1 recording of this tune.

All Covered With Moss appears in 2 other tune collections.

All Covered With Moss has been added to 2 tunebooks.

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Two settings

1
X: 1
T: All Covered With Moss
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
c2 E EDE | GED DED | c2 E EDE | ~c3 dcA |
GED DED | DED DEF | ~E3 GAB |[1 ~c3 BAG :|[2 ~c3 BAB|]
~G3 BGB | AGA BGE | G2 A BGB | ~c3 BAB |
[1 ~G3 BGB | AGA BAB | ~d3 dcB | ~c3 B2 A :|
[2 GBd gdB | ~d3 dBA | GED GAB | ~c3 ~B3 |]
# Added by protz .
2
X: 2
T: All Covered With Moss
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
c2 E EDE | GED DED | cBc EDE | ~c3 dcA |
GED DED | DED DEF | ~E3 GAB |[1 cdc BAG :|[2 cdc BAB|]
~G3 BGB | AGA BGE | GFG BGB | cdc BAB |
[1 ~G3 BGB | AGA BAB | ~d3 dcB | cdc BAB :|
[2 GBd gdB | ~d3 dBA | GED GAB | cdc BAG |]
# Added by protz .

Five comments

All Covered With Moss

Here’s a rather strange piece I learned a long time ago when I was offered O’Neill’s book. It alternates between the tones of C Dorian and G major, I post in 1 the version of the book (ed. 1976, page 23), and in 2 the version I play (which differs finally not so much from the original), with less ornamentation everywhere: it may fit a little better for the fiddle.

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Tone mistake

Oops sorry, not in C dor obviously, but C mix! ;)

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Re: All Covered With Moss

Great tune!

Re: All Covered With Moss

I’ve been slowly working my way through O’Neill’s massive tunebook as well, and also found both the title and sound of this tune to be rather curiously arresting. After doing a little searching online, I found the following information from the Traditional Tune Archive site (https://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:All_Covered_with_Moss). Here’s what it says about the history (I’m copying directly from that site):

…………………….
" ALL COVERED WITH MOSS. AKA and see "Roger the Weaver." Irish, Jig (6/8 time). G Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). AAB. The tonal center of the tune changes from ‘C’ to ‘G’ in the second strain, albeit not a strict key change (as in a North American quadrille. Rather, the first strain falls into the modal category, while the second is more solidly in ‘G’ major. The tune was played by fiddler Edward Cronin, born in County Tipperary in the 1830’s, although he had no name for it, nor could anyone recall it. A member of Francis O’Neill’s traditional Irish music circle in Chicago, Sergeant Early (an uilleann piper and member of the Chicago police force), upon hearing Cronin play, remarked "with evident appreciation, ‘Ah, that’s well covered with moss’—alluding to its ancient strains" O’Neill seized upon the remark as a convenient title. [O’Neill’s Irish Folk Music: A Fascinating Hobby (1910, chapt. 5). Collector P.W. Joyce published the melody in his Old Irish Folk Music and Songs (1909) as "Roger the Weaver."

Printed sources: O’Neill (Music of Ireland: 1850 Melodies), 1903; No. 782, p. 146. O’Neill (Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems), 1907; No. 58, p. 26. O’Neill (Krassen), 1976; p. 23."
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I looked on this site to see if there’s already a tune posted called "Roger the Weaver" and didn’t see any, but a transcription of it is linked at the site above and you can see the similarity.

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Re: All Covered With Moss

I’ll say upfront that I’m biased, but I do prefer O’Neill’s version of the tune.

I found that same page and the version of Roger the Weaver back when I was writing the liner notes. It’s an interesting question as to whether the title and the tune from Joyce is older than O’Neill - obviously the name All Covered With Moss was made up on the occasion described, but it’s currently unknown how Roger the Weaver arrived as a title - possibly he was Joyce’s source for the tune, and so that title isn’t necessarily more "correct". Joyce’s version was published after O’Neill’s, but publication date doesn’t really give us the absolute age of the tune, and it isn’t clear when the tune was collected by either of them. In the end, they’re clearly the same tune, with the differences really very much in the realm of variation.

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