Bog An Lochan strathspey

Also known as Athol Commers, Athole Cummers, Atholl Cummers, Bog A’ Lochan, Bog A’Lochain, Bog An Lachan, Bog An Lochain, Bog An Logan, Bog An Login - Ashley MacIsaac, Bog On Lochan, Bog On Lochon, Bogan Lochan, Bogan Logan, Boggin Logan, The Water Ousel, The Water Ouzel, The Water-ouzel.

There are 38 recordings of a tune by this name.

A tune by this name has been recorded together with The Nine Pint Coggie (lots of times), Flora Macdonald (a few times), The Smith Of Chilliechassie (a few times), The Tarbolton (a few times) and The Warlocks (a few times).

Bog An Lochan has been added to 2 tune sets.

Bog An Lochan has been added to 213 tunebooks.

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Three settings

X: 1
T: Bog An Lochan
R: strathspey
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Bmin
|: A3/2A/2 A3/2B/2 AB/2 e3/2d/2| A3/2A/2 A3/2B/2 GB/2 d3/2B/2| A3/2A/2 A3/2B/2 AB/2 e3/2d/2| ((3efg) d3/2g/2 B3/2G/2 d3/2B/2:|
e3/2A/2 e3/2d/2 e3/2A/2 e/2a3/2| e3/2A/2 e3/2d/2 B3/2G/2 d3/2B/2| e3/2A/2 e3/2d/2 e3/2A/2 e3/2d/2| ((3efg) d3/2g/2 B3/2G/2 d3/2B/2|
e3/2A/2 e3/2d/2 e3/2A/2 e/2a3/2| e3/2A/2 e3/2d/2 B3/2G/2 d3/2B/2| e3/2A/2 e3/2d/2 A3/2B/2 e3/2d/2| ((3efg) d3/2g/2 B3/2G/2 d3/2c/2 |
|: B3/2B/2 B3/2c/2 Bc/2 f3/2e/2| B3/2B/2 B3/2c/2 Ac/2 e3/2c/2| B3/2B/2 B3/2c/2 Bc/2 f3/2e/2|((3fga) e3/2a/2 c3/2A/2 e3/2c/2:|
f3/2B/2 f3/2e/2 f3/2B/2 f/2a3/2| f3/2B/2 f3/2e/2 c3/2A/2 e3/2c/2| f3/2B/2 f3/2e2 f3/2B/2 f3/2e/2|((3fga) e3/2a/2 c3/2A/2 e3/2c/2|
f3/2B/2 f3/2e/2 f3/2B/2 f/2a3/2| f3/2B/2 f3/2e/2 c3/2A/2 e3/2c/2| f3/2B/2 f3/2e/2 B3/2c/2 f3/2e/2|((3fga) e3/2a/2 c3/2A/2 e3/2c/2||
X: 2
T: Bog An Lochan
R: strathspey
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Edor
E/E/EE2 E>FB>F|E/E/EE2 F<DA>F|E/E/EE2 E>FB>A|1 B<dA>d F<DA>F:|2 B<dA>d F<DD>A||
B<EB>A B<EE>A|B<EB>A F<DD>A|B<EB>A d>ef>e|1 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>A:|2 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>f||
e/e/ee2 e>fb>f|e/e/ee2 f<da>f|e/e/ee2 e>fb>f|g<eb>e df/g/ a>f|
g<eb>e g<eb>e|g<eb>e df/g/ a>f|g<eb>e d>ef>e|d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>A||
B<EB>A B<EE>A|B<EB>A F<DD>A|B<EB>A d>ef>e|1 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>A:|2 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>F||
X: 3
T: Bog An Lochan
R: strathspey
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Edor
|: F | E/E/E E2 E>FB>F | E/E/E E2 F<DA>F |
E/E/E E2 E>FB>A |1 B<dA>d F<DA>F :|2 B<dA<d F<DD>d ||
B<EB>A B<EE>e | B<EB>A F<DD>d |
B<EB>A d>ef>e |1 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>d :|2 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>f ||
e/e/e e2 e>fb>f | e/e/e e2 f>da>f |
e/e/e e2 e>fb>f | g<eb>e df/g/ a>f |
g>eb>e g<eb>e | g<eb>e df/g/ a<f |
g<eb<e d>ef>e | d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>d ||
B<EB>A B<EE>e | B<EB>A F<DD>d |
B<EB>A d>ef>e |1 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>A :|2 d/c/B/A/ dA F<DD ||

Thirteen comments

In respose to request from ktmacm.

Taken from the playing of Hamish Moore. Before anyone starts the first parts really in Am but I don’t know how to do two keys. Most people play Am (I think) but I thought I’d put both keys in.

Called bogan lochan in most books

Mary Jane Lamond recorded this one as mouth music. Is it related with Flora MacDonald? I especially love the Cape Breton version and want to learn it.

Usually played in Edor

Well, it’s actually played in Edor and has 4 parts.

Bog an Lochan: 4-part version

Here’s the transcription of the tune based on Scots fiddler Duncan Dyker’s playing:

X: 1
T: Bog an Lochan
R: strathspey
L: 1/8
M: 4/4
K: Edor
E/E/EE2 E>FB>F|E/E/EE2 F<DA>F|E/E/EE2 E>FB>A|1 B<dA>d F<DA>F:|2 B<dA>d F<DD>A||
B<EB>A B<EE>A|B<EB>A F<DD>A|B<EB>A d>ef>e|1 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>A:|2 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>f||
e/e/ee2 e>fb>f|e/e/ee2 f<da>f|e/e/ee2 e>fb>f|g<eb>e df/g/ a>f|
g<eb>e g<eb>e|g<eb>e df/g/ a>f|g<eb>e d>ef>e|d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>A||
B<EB>A B<EE>A|B<EB>A F<DD>A|B<EB>A d>ef>e|1 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>A:|2 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>F||

Cape Breton fiddlers play a slightly different version, which is probably similar to the one Norbeck transcribed in his collection.

“Bog an Lochan” ~ jigified ~ “Paddy’s Leather Breeches”

https://thesession.org/tunes/2161

I have suspicions that ‘Paddy’ came across a melody he liked, someone else wrote it out in jig time instead of 4/4, as has happened to other ‘skipped’ music, including in printed collections. This tune fits ‘4’ beautifully and is best as a Strathspey rather than a jig. The whole structure of this melody is, in my opinion, lame when crammed into 2X3, 6/8… It just doesn’t fit well, but then we all know folks who squeeze into clothes a size or more too small for them, like ‘leather breeches’. And then there’s those really cheap leather breeches that look like shight even when they do fit, but the wearer is too wrapped up in them to notice, or doesn’t want to after putting the cash down. That sort of stuff doesn’t go well with my fragile constitution. ;-)

Bog an Lochan (strathspey): 2 Distinct Versions for Different Instruments

To correct myself, this tune is actually played in both in Ador and in Edor: pipers play the 2-part version in Ador as originally posted by "borderpiper"; and fiddlers usually play the 4-part versions in Edor as I posted above. I prefer the 2-part version as a mediocre flute and whistle player, but actually the 4-part versions have been much more popular through the playing of numerous Cape Breton fiddlers and Altan. (I believe Altan learned it off a Cape Breton fiddler.)

I once tried hard to play the 3rd part of the Edor version on the whistle. I could do it, but not on a satisfactory level.

“Bog an Lochan” ~ MDCCCLXXXVII

"The Skye Collection of the Best Reels & Strathspeys Extant ~"
Keith Norman MacDonald, 1887

"Bog an Lochan" / "Athole Cummers"
R: strathspey
L: 1/8
M: 4/4
K: Edor
|: F |
E/E/E E2 E>FB>F | E/E/E E2 F<DA>F |
E/E/E E2 E>FB>A |1 B<dA>d F<DA>F :|
2 B<dA<d F<DD>d ||
B<EB>A B<EE>e | B<EB>A F<DD>d |
B<EB>A d>ef>e |1 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>d :|
2 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>f ||
e/e/e e2 e>fb>f | e/e/e e2 f>da>f |
e/e/e e2 e>fb>f | g<eb>e df/g/ a>f |
g>eb>e g<eb>e | g<eb>e df/g/ a<f |
g<eb<e d>ef>e | d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>d ||
B<EB>A B<EE>e | B<EB>A F<DD>d |
B<EB>A d>ef>e |1 d/c/B/A/ d>A F<DD>A :|
2 d/c/B/A/ dA F<DD ||

Bog an Lochain - early recording

Thanks for all the interesting info on this great tune.
Nobody seems to have mentioned the recording of this by Bill Lamey, recorded around 1950 and available on ‘Bill Lamey - Classic recordings of Scottish Fiddling’ Shanachie 14002 That’s the number for vinyl but I hope it is available on CD now.
The sleeve notes state:
" One of the oldest printed strathspeys, having appeared in Bremner’s Collection pulished between 1751 and 1761. Bog an Lochain, the Water Ouzel (Dipper) suggests that this fine tune, like many other imitative of children’s rhymes in Gaelic, was inspired by the cry of this wild bird. John Shaw, in his research of Cape Breton violin music, recorded words to this tune found in the Isle of Skye (gives the words available on the website mentioned earlier)."
Incidentally, this is a fantastic recording and well worth seeking out.