How Cold The Wind Doth Blow barndance

Also known as The Unquiet Grave.

There are 6 recordings of this tune.

How Cold The Wind Doth Blow has been added to 4 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Two settings

1
X: 1
T: How Cold The Wind Doth Blow
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Fmaj
F2 | A2 F2 B2 d2 | {c}A6 G2 | F6 F2 | A2 F2 B2 d2 | {c}A4 (3GAG F2 |
G6 F2| A2 GF A2 GF |A2 c2 f4 | -f4 d4 | c2 A2 FA cB |
A4 G4 {AG}| F6 |]
2
X: 2
T: How Cold The Wind Doth Blow
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
D2 | G3 F E2 FG | A2 B2 D2 zc | c3 cBA G2 | A6 |
zD | GABc d3 c | BAGF E2 cc | B2 D2 F2 A2 | G6 |]

Four comments

How Cold The Wind Doth Blow

Also known as "The Unquiet Grave", a harrowing song with a beautiful tune, more of a slow air.

Words:- How cold the wind doth blow, dear Love!
How heavy fall the drops of rain!
I never had but one true love,
And in the green woods he was slain.

I’ll do as much for my true love
As ever in my power doth lay;
I will sit and mourn upon his grave
Dear love, a twelvemonth and a day.

When this twelvemonth was gone and past
The ghost began to speak at the last,
"Why sit you here all on my grave,
Sweet heart! and will not let me sleep!

O what is it you want of me
Sweet heart! or what of me would have?
"One kiss, one kiss from your snowy white lips
Is all I crave from you dear love."

"My lips they are so cold as clay,
My breath it doth smell earthy and strong;
If you were to kiss my snowy white lips,
Sweet heart! your time would not be long."

How cold the wind doth blow, dear love,
How heavy fall the drops of rain!
I never had but one true love,
And in the green-woods he was slain.

This version of the traditional song was collected in the early 20th century in Sussex.

The grace notes are best played quite slowly.

Re: How Cold The Wind Doth Blow

Luke Kelly of the Dubliners (1940-1984) sang this song though the tune is somewhat different.

How Cold The Wind Doth Blow, X:2

A less mournful setting of this tune.

Re: How Cold The Wind Doth Blow

I neglected to say that Vaughan-Williams took down setting x:1. He wrote an accompaniment for piano and violin - which is how I first came to hear this tune (I’ve a cd with Robert Tear, tenor, singing the song, accompanied by Philip Ledger (piano) and Hugh Bean (violin). Very beautiful - and his other folk song arrangements are well worth a listen as long as you don’t mind "art song" settings for folk music.

Have learned how to do sustained notes on abc - so have done small edit.