The Little Fair Cannavans slip jig

Also known as An Ceannabhan Ban, Ceannabhan Ban, The Cotton Grass Flowers, Little Fair Canavans, The Little Fair Canavans, Na Ceannabain Bana, Na Ceannabáin Bhána, Na Ceannabh, Na Ceannabhain Bana, Na Ceannabháin Bhána.

There are 12 recordings of a tune by this name.

A tune by this name has been recorded together with Brian’s (a few times), The Geese In The Bog (a few times), The Hag With The Money (a few times), Lizzy In The Lowground (a few times) and Paidin O Raifeartaigh (a few times).

The Little Fair Cannavans has been added to 4 tune sets.

The Little Fair Cannavans has been added to 142 tunebooks.

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One setting

X: 1
T: The Little Fair Cannavans
R: slip jig
M: 9/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
c|BGG AGE GED|E/F/GD DEG A2A|BGG AGE GED|E/F/GD DEF G2:|
A|:Bdd edd BAG|Bdd edB A2c|Bdd edd BAG|GED DEF G2A|
Bdd edd BAG|Bdd gdB A2c|Bdd edd BAG|GED DEF G2|

Six comments

Source: Sean Kane, Matt Molloy, Liam O’Flinn : "the fire aflame"
Transcription: g.m.p.

It is similar to The Swaggering Jig ( https://thesession.org/tunes/661 ),
but there are enough differences to make it a discinct tune.

Fair Cannavans

just by the Irish name "Na Ceannabaine Bainne" (spelling may not be totally correct)

This is a lilting tune from Connemara, Seamus Ennis made it popular with pipers.

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The Little Fair Cannavans

[ From English Wikipedia: ]
"Na Ceannabháin Bhána" = "The Fair Canavans" is a song in slip jig time from Carna in Connemara, County Galway, Ireland.
It was collected by Séamus Ennis from Colm Ó Caoidheáin who is thought to have written it for his two fairhaired ("bán" = "white" or "fair-haired") grandchildren whose surname was Canavan / Ó Ceannabháin.
The title of this piece of music when played without lyrics has been mistranslated as The White Cotton Flowers or The Fair Cotton Flowers , due to the similarity :
- to the Irish word for bog cotton i.e. Ceannbhán
- to the surname Ó Ceannabháin which actually derives from the earlier Ó Ceanndhubháin (a branch of the Uí Bhriúin Seola), meaning the descendent of Ceanndhubhán "blackheaded" i.e. "blackhaired".
One story of the song’s meaning is of a grandparent calling out for the two fair haired children, who are hiding amongst the bog-cotton of their namesake.
The second verse relates the frustration of their refusal to reveal themselves, with the threat of being put up to the local witch "Sadhbh Sheáin" who will put a curse upon them.

Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin
Goirim fhéin Micil ‘s Máire
Goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin, goirim fhéin
Siúd iad na Ceannabháin Bhána

Cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé
Cuirfidh mé suas chuig Sadhbh Sheáin thú
Cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé, cuirfidh mé
‘S cuirfidh sí buairthín sa ngleann ort

I summon you, I summon you, I summon you
I summon you Michael and Mary
I summon you, I summon you, I summon you
The little fair Canavans

I’ll send you, I’ll send you, I’ll send you
I’ll send you up to Sadhbh Sheáin’s
I’ll send you, I’ll send you, I’ll send you
And she will put a curse (lit. a small worry) on you in the glen