Reel De Napoleon reel

Also known as Reel Du Voyageur.

There are 4 recordings of this tune.

Reel De Napoleon has been added to 5 tunebooks.

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One setting

1
X: 1
T: Reel De Napoleon
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Cmaj
|:G|EGGc AFAF|EGdc Bcdf|ecc2 AFAF|EGdB c3G|
EFGc AFAF|EGdc Bcdf|ecc2 AFF2|EGdB c3:|
|:e|gcac gcea|g2ec Bddf|ecca gedc|BGAB cBce|
gcac gcea|g2ec Bddf|ecGc AFAF|EGdB c3:|

Two comments

Reel De Napoleon

I’m surprised that this tune isn’t already on here, and I’m still half-expecting to be directed to it, but I’ve tried searching its titles and even searching ABC but couldn’t find it.

I first got to know it from the playing of Jean Carignan from both disc 1 of the ‘Archives’ set and at 27:23 in this video of the documentary ‘Jean Carignan, violoneux’:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGmwpCUuvec


It has also featured on Celtic Fiddle Festival’s set lists:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gurz_jMJFGk


And you can hear Andre Brunet and Kevin Burke give their respective renditions solo in these videos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yf5CqAvF0z0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bE-8fhr-sYQ


Rather than give multiple versions that barely differ, I’ve given a fairly distilled outline here that doesn’t dip into all of the little tricks and alternatives possible with the tune (least of all Carignan’s!). Carignan’s version on the CD actually reverses the parts above, so his A section is given here as the B section; I went with the Brunet/Burke version here partly because so many tunes seem to reserve the higher phrase for the B section. The tune has something of a single reel quality, but the Brunet/Burke version is played double; however, Carignan in both aforementioned recordings only ever plays the A part (his B part) once, but always repeats the other. Discuss!

It’s named Reel de Napoleon by Brunet but the Carignan recording gives it as yet another tune under the ‘Reel du voyageur’ bracket.

Re: Reel De Napoleon

I should’ve added that - as Brunet mentions -the tune is familiar from the playing of Joseph Allard, and may indeed be his own composition.