The Legacy jig

Also known as Brendan Ring’s, Larry Redican’s, Rolls, The Tailor’s Wedding.

There are 40 recordings of a tune by this name.

A tune by this name has been recorded together with The Castlebar Races (a few times), The Gallowglass (a few times), The Kesh (a few times), The Killavil (a few times) and Strike The Gay Harp (a few times).

The Legacy has been added to 13 tune sets.

The Legacy has been added to 312 tunebooks.

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Five settings

X: 1
T: The Legacy
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
~G3 ~B3|~g3 gab|~G3 ~B3|dBA AFD|
~G3 ~B3|~g3 gab|age edB|1dBA AFD:|2dBA ABd||
~e3 edB|ded dBd|~e3 edB|gdB ABd|
~e3 edB|ded def|~g3 ~e3|1dBA ABd:|2dBA AFD||
X: 2
T: The Legacy
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G3 BAB|ggd gab|G3 BAB|dBG A3|G3 BAB|ggd gab|age eeg|1dBG A3:|2dBG ABd|:e3 edB|d3 dBd|ege edB|d2 B ABd|e3 edB|dBd def|g3 ege|dBG A3:|
X: 3
T: The Legacy
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: e | GGG BGB | d2e g3 | GGG BGB | dBA A2e |
GGG BGB | d2e g3 | agf g2e | dBA A2 :|
|: e | A2e edB | d2e dBA | A2e edB | dBA A2e |
A2e edB | d2e g2e | agf g2e | dBA A2 :|
X: 4
T: The Legacy
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Fmaj
~F3 ~A3|~f3 fga|~F3 ~A3|cAF GAG|
~F3 ~A3|~f3 fga|gfd dfd|[1 cAF GAG:|[2 cAG GAc||
~d3 dcA|~c3 cAc|~d3 dcA|cAG GAc|
~d3 dcA|~c3 cde|~f3 ~d3|[1 cAF GAc:|[2 cAF GAG|]
X: 5
T: The Legacy
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Fmaj
F2F AFA| f2 e fga|F2 F AFA|cAF GDE|
F2 F AFA|f2 e fga|gfd dfd|1cAF BAG:||2cAF GAc|
||:d2 d dcA|c2 c cAc|d2 d dcA|cAF GAc|
d2 d dcA|c2 c cde|fef dfd|1cAF GAc:||2cAF BAG||

Twenty-one comments

Hmm, I am surprised this one wasn’t in the data base already. I have it on a Willy Clancy CD, and have heard it at the session I go to off and on. I decided to learn it ages ago, but have let it slip from my repetoire. Thanks for reminding me of it, I should re-learn it.

Posted by .

Maybe you already knew it as Larry Redican’s. .php/2324

Draiocht Setting

I learned this version from the Lands End CD. Its pretty nice.
Also called The Tailors Wedding

Here it is

X: 1
T: Legacy, The
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
R: jig
K: Gmaj
G3 BAB|ggd gab|G3 BAB|dBG A3|G3 BAB|ggd gab|age eeg|1dBG A3:|2dBG ABd|:e3 edB|d3 dBd|ege edB|d2 B ABd|e3 edB|dBd def|g3 ege|dBG A3:|

Good Stuff

I fell in love with this tune when I first heard it off a Willie Clancy cd, and now I love playing it even more.

An Dochass

It’s on an album called Dragonfly by An Dochas — it’s a great take on an old classic.

By the way, it’s on Jack and Charlie Coen’s "The Branch Line" CD that this tune appears as "Larry Redican’s."

Tailor’s Wedding

Here’s the old Scottish version of this jig.

X: 1
T: The Tailor’s Wedding
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
R: jig
K: Gmaj
|: e | GGG BGB | d2e g3 | GGG BGB | dBA A2e |
GGG BGB | d2e g3 | agf g2e | dBA A2 :|
|: e | A2e edB | d2e dBA | A2e edB | dBA A2e |
A2e edB | d2e g2e | agf g2e | dBA A2 :|

This tune is not only included in O’Neill (both ‘1850’ and ‘1001’) under the title ‘The Tailor’s Wedding’, but shows up (with parts reversed) as ‘Skiver the Quilt’ in the older Levey Collection of the Dance Music of Ireland (1858). Anyone know what "skiver" means?

Posted by .

"Anyone know what "skiver" means?"

The quilt must be made of leather, as to skive is to pare thin slices of leather - skiver would mean the same. It’s from the Norse.

Skiver

One use of the word I’ve come across dates from the American Revolution and seems to refer to bayoneting , so perhaps piercing.
"After three such volleys, the Americans retreated. Believing the militiamen to be fleeing, Tarleton’s men surged after them, only to run into a fourth deadly volley, laid down by Continentals posted in a second line behind the militiamen. Morgan then unleashed his cavalry, which materialized from behind a ridge; the horsemen, slashing with their sabers, bellowed "Tarleton’s quarter." The "shock was so sudden and violent," one rebel would recall, that the British quickly retreated. Many threw down their weapons and ran, said another, "as hard…as a drove of wild Choctaw steers." About 250 of the British, including Tarleton, escaped. Many of those who could not flee fell to their knees, pleading for their lives: "Dear, good Americans, have mercy on us! It has not been our fault, that we have SKIVERED so many." The cavalrymen showed little mercy, an American, James Collins, reported later in his memoirs, attacking both armed and unarmed men, sweeping the battlefield like a "whirlwind."

"One use of the word I’ve come across dates from the American Revolution and seems to refer to bayoneting , so perhaps piercing"

Well spotted! Having looked it up in the OED, it seems this is likely the original spelling of ‘skewer’, though with the same origin as the usage related to slicing leather (O.N. skifa - cut or slice). If you hear a Dane say ‘skive’, it is close to the way ‘skewer’ is pronounced in English.

Not quite sure why you’d skewer a quilt, however - could be bayonet practice!

“Fosgail An Dorus” ~ all in the family - early roots

Submitted on October 3rd 2008 by bogman.
https://thesession.org/tunes/8968

Through the process of association ~courtesy of FIDDLE4 / nicholas & Will Harmon
~ in discussion ;-)

Discussion: old Irish jig Title ?
# Posted on February 24th 2012 by FIDDLE4
~ discussions/display/29403

The Legacy, X:4

I heard this recently in F at a session in East Clare.

The Legacy

I learn this version from the playing of Dana Lyn and Kyle Sanna live version of a set from their inspiring album "The Great Arc".