The Crooked Road To Dublin reel

Also known as An Bóthar Cam, The Crooked Road, Smiles & Tears Of Erin, The Smiles And Tears Of Erin.

There are 75 recordings of a tune by this name.

A tune by this name has been recorded together with The Old Bush (a few times), The Ladies Pantalettes (a few times), Sporting Nell (a few times), The Abbey (a few times) and The Bucks Of Oranmore (a few times).

The Crooked Road To Dublin has been added to 11 tune sets.

The Crooked Road To Dublin has been added to 440 tunebooks.

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Four settings

X: 1
T: The Crooked Road To Dublin
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G2 BG FGAF|(3GGG Ac BdcA|GBAG FGAg|fdcA dBcA|
GBAG FGAF|GBAc BdcA|GBAG FGAg|fdcA d2 Bc|
d~g3 fgaf|d~g3 agfe|d~g3 fgag|fdcA dBcA|
d~g3 fgaf|d~g3 afga|bgaf gbag|fdcA BGAF|
# Added .
X: 2
T: The Crooked Road To Dublin
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
F|G2(3GGG FGAF|G2FG AdcA|GBAG FGAg|fdce (3dcB cA|
G2(3GGG FGAF|G2FG AdcA|GBAG FGAg|fdce d2cA||
dg~g2 fgaf|dg~g2 agfd|dg~g2 fgag|fdce d2cA|
dg~g2 fgaf|dg~g2 a2ga|(3bag gf gbag|fdcA d2cA||
X: 3
T: The Crooked Road To Dublin
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G3G FGAF|G2FG AdcA|G2AG FGAg|1 fdcA dBcA:|2 fdcA d2Bc||
dg~g2 fgaf|dg~g2 agfe|dg~g2 fgag|fdcA d2Bc|
dg~g2 fgaf|dg~g2 a2ga|bgaf gbag|fdcA d2cA||
X: 4
T: The Crooked Road To Dublin
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmin
O:Cape Breton setting
F|DG G/G/G FGAF|G2FG AdTcA|GBAG FGAg|fdce d2 BA|
G/G/G +>+G2 FGAF|G2FG AdcA|GBAG FGAg|fdce d2 BA||
dg g/g/g fgaf|dg g/g/g agfd|dg g/g/g fgag|fdce d2cA|
dg g/g/g fgaf|dg g/g/g {g}a2 (uga)|bgaf gbag|fdcA d2cA|]

Twenty-one comments

The Crooked Road to Dublin

Sometimes referred to simply as the Crooked Road, this tune certainly weaves a crooked path through what at first sounds like a straight forward melody. Martin Hayes elaborates on that path on his cd Under the Moon, one of the best versions of this tune I’ve come across.

Posted .

Quite Redeemed

This is also one of my favorite tunes, this tune is a little more dificult than it looks.

The Crooked Road to Dublin

My transcription from
Andy McGann & Paul Brady : "Masters Of Irish Music"
F|G2(3GGG FGAF|G2FG AdcA|GBAG FGAg|fdce (3dcB cA|
G2(3GGG FGAF|G2FG AdcA|GBAG FGAg|fdce d2cA||
dg~g2 fgaf|dg~g2 agfd|dg~g2 fgag|fdce d2cA|
dg~g2 fgaf|dg~g2 a2ga|(3bag gf gbag|fdcA d2cA||

Aka Smiles and Tears of Erin

I picked this one up as Smiles & Tears of Erin, from either vol1 or 3 of CRE.

- Chris

Im very confused!! Is teh midi a different tune?:s

The midi file looks and sounds nothing like the sheetmusic :s

Eh?

That’s funny…I’m hearing the Convenience Reel (aka The Boys of Sligo) on the midi. Must be a software glitch.

Posted .

I’m aware no two persons ever play a particular tune in the same way, but I find Will’s transcritpion of this tune rather awkward, especially in the first part. The basic version of the tune you’d come across in many different places is something like this:

K: Gmaj
G3G FGAF|G2FG AdcA|G2AG FGAg|1 fdcA dBcA:|2 fdcA d2Bc||
dg~g2 fgaf|dg~g2 agfe|dg~g2 fgag|fdcA d2Bc|
dg~g2 fgaf|dg~g2 a2ga|bgaf gbag|fdcA d2cA||

I suspect this is related to these well-known tunes:
The Steampacket: https://thesession.org/tunes/690
The Abbey Reel: https://thesession.org/tunes/477

The Abbey Reel into the Crooked Rd will make a nice set.

Kieran, I can see why the setting I posted might tie a whistle or flute player’s fingers into knots in the A part. But it works fine on fiddle. One of the things I’m enjoying about learning flute is how it helps me rethink many tunes, playing with certain phrases, placing rolls, etc. Very different from fiddle.

Posted .

Will, do you mean I have to learn fiddle? I can’t afford one, and I have to have my cracked flute repaired first.

I’m now listening to John Blake and Lamond Gillespie’s beautiful flute & fiddle duet playing. They both play a version very similar to the one I transcribed. I believe it’s fun to play the very first bar like that, even on the fiddle.

When I play fiddle with a fluter or whistle player, I usually choose notes and phrasing to better fit with them. I’d do that in this case too.

Stick with flute and whistle. Don’t get me wrong—I enjoy playing fiddle very much, but flute is every bit as fun and rewarding (and to me feels more natural, far less awkward).

Posted .

tune & midi do not match. I like them both but I do not know which is proper by the name. anyone know?

The Crooked Road to Dublin

Fiddler Andy McGann learned this tune and "Merry Harriers" from Michael Coleman. “Andy remembers Coleman writing the Crooked Road for him.” (liner notes from album It’s a Hard Road to Travel, 1995).

C: Michael Coleman?

"Fiddler Andy McGann learned this tune and "Merry Harriers" from Michael Coleman. “Andy remembers Coleman writing the Crooked Road for him.” (liner notes from album It’s a Hard Road to Travel, 1995)."

Is that a "composed" for him, or a "written down" for him?

Posted by .

C: Michael Coleman?

I read it as "written down" for him.

I had too, just wondering!

Posted by .

The Crooked Road to Dublin

I can’t help but feel that the end if this tune is rather sudden and abrupt. It just seem unfinished.

Many a crooked road comes to an abrupt end….

The Crooked Road to Dublin

When traditional music is written down there are a number of assumptions made which are not evident in the notation. The ending of this tune is written as if either you were going back to the beginning to repeat it, or immediately going into another tune. If you were playing it at the end of a set, or by itself, you might end on the d note or, if you wished to resolve, play something like, | fdcA d2 cA | "last time" Bz Az G4 ||

The Crooked Road To Dublin, X:4

Cape Breton setting as played by Natalie MacMaster.

Smiles and Tears of Erin

This tune was recorded in New York in November 1934 by the ‘Smiles and Tears of Erin’ Orchestra as the second tune in a set entitled ‘Master Rogers - Reel Medley’. This 78 record is presumably the source of Breathnach’s title for this tune. ‘The Smiles and Tears of Erin’ was a group of Irish musicians put together by the Longford fiddler Jim Clarke (1887-1938). They were joined on this record by the fiddle and melodeon player Frank Quinn (1893-1964). Quinn and Clarke lived a few miles away from each other in Drumlish, Longford before they both emigrated to New York. They named this track in honour of their fiddle teacher Bernard Rogers (1856-1907) a local fiddle master who lived beside them. The first tune in the set actually derives it’s name from Rogers - ‘Colonel Rodger’s Favourite’. The title of this particular tune was made famous by the Leitrim flute player John McKenna who recorded it the very same month in New York. Presumably he decided to upgrate ‘Master’ to a ‘Colonel’!!

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