The Periwig reel

Also known as A’Phiorbhuic, The Perriwig, Tae The Beggin’, The Wig.

There are 22 recordings of a tune by this name.

A tune by this name has been recorded together with Cota Mor Ealasaid (a few times), O, She’s Comical (a few times) and Sweet Molly (a few times).

The Periwig has been added to 6 tune sets.

The Periwig has been added to 70 tunebooks.

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Two settings

X: 1
T: The Periwig
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Emin
|:"Em"g2fg "Bm"agfa|gefg "Em"dB~B2|g2fg "Bm"agfa|1gefd "Em"~e3f:|2gefd "Em"~e3g||
|:"G"dB~B2 dGBd|dGBd "D"cAAe|"G"dB~B2 defd|1"C"~g2 fd "D"eage:|2"C"~g2 fd "D"edef||
X: 2
T: The Periwig
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Emin
~g3b agfa|gfeg dB~B2|~g3b agfa|1 gef^d e3f:|2 gef^d e3g||
|:dB~B2 dBBg|eBBA GEEg|dB~B2 dBBa|1 gef^d e3g:|2 gef^d e3f||

Six comments

Tae the Beggin’

This is as played by Kevin Crawford on his album ‘In Good Company’ (great CD) He learned it from the playing of Ossian, the Scottish Band, and as the reel was uncredited, he named it after the song which preceded it. It doesn’t sound obviously Scottish, and sits as nicely in the Irish tradition. Simple, effective, and attractive. Pseud’s corner?!

Can’t be certain

Don’t have the book to hand, but this sounds like a setting of the old Scottish Gaelic tune ‘Piorbhuic’, The Perriwig (Wig). Although I’m probably wrong, will check it later.

Correct!

You’re quite right, cluiche - it is the Scottish pipe-tune the "Periwig".

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The Periwig

I picked up this tune at my local session and just learnt the name today, having been told it was on the Kevin Crawford recording. Had a look at the original Scottish version, found that I liked the descending E minor phrase in the B-part better than KC’s setting and came up with this:

X: 1
T: The Periwig
R: Pipe Reel
O: Scottish
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Emin
~g3b agfa|gfeg dB~B2|~g3b agfa|1 gef^d e3f:|2 gef^d e3g||
|:dB~B2 dBBg|eBBA GEEg|dB~B2 dBBa|1 gef^d e3g:|2 gef^d e3f||

A’Phiorbhuic

The word must be related to French word for wig, une perruque.

The Periwig

A “periwig” was a once-fashionable large hairpiece. The air seems to have been for a humorous song now forgotten. There is a story of a very old minister of Boleskin by Loch Ness; a fellow diner tickled the minister with a blade of corn under his periwig. This continued until, afraid that it was an earwig or spider in his wig, he took it off and shook it over the fire. Alas, he dropped it into the fire and almost suffocated everyone else at the party. The story is told in the 1874 edition of Simon Fraser’s collection, and he states that "the real name of the air is ‘The Fry’d Periwig’," suggesting that event as its inspiration.