Major Molle reel

Also known as Major Malley, Major Malley’s, Major Mole.

There are 3 recordings of a tune by this name.

Major Molle has been added to 2 tune sets.

Major Molle has been added to 28 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Six settings

X: 1
T: Major Molle
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Bdor
|:Bffe dcBA|Bffe d2c2|Bffg (3aaa af|ecAc e2dc:|
BF (3FFF dBcA|BF (3FFF d2 cd|1BF (3FFF dBce|
cAAc e2 dc:|2Bffg (3aaa af|ecAc e2 dc||
X: 2
T: Major Molle
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
c2 B2|:AE (3EEE cBcd|AE (3EEE c2Bc|AE (3EEE cBcd|BGGB d2 cB|
AE (3EEE cBcd|AE (3EEE c2Bc|A2 e^f gfge|dBGB edcB||
||:A2 ed cBAG|A2 ed (3cdc (3BcB|A2 e^f gfge|dBGB edcB:||
# Added by bobbi .
X: 3
T: Major Molle
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Amin
|: A<ee>d c>dB>c | A<ee>d Tc2 B<c |\
|: A<E E2 A>Ec>E | A<EE>E c2 B<c |\
|: Aeed cBA^G | Aeed c2 B2 |\
|: AE E/E/E cAB^G | AE E/E/E c2 Bc |\
X: 4
T: Major Molle
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Bmin
|: Bff>e dcB^A | Bff>e Td2 c2 |\
X: 5
T: Major Molle
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Amin
DA A>G | FE DC | DA A>G | F2 E2 | DA A>B | cA/B/ cA | G>E CE | G2 FE :|
DA,- A,A,/A,/ | FD EC | DA, A,/A,/A, | F2 EF | DA, A,/A,/A, | FD EF | G>E CE | G2 FE |
DA,- A,A,/A,/ | FD EC | DA, A,/A,/A, | F2 EF | DA A>B | cA/B/ cA | G>E CE | G2 FE ||
X: 6
T: Major Molle
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
|:Aeed cABG|Aeed c2Bc|Aeed efge|dBGB edcB|
Aeed cABG|Aeed c2Bc|Aeed efge|dBGB edcB||
|:AE E2 cABG|AE E2 c2 Bc|AE E2 cABd|BGGB d2 cB|
AE E2 cABG|AE E2 c2 Bc|Aeed efge|dBGB edcB||
# Added by JACKB .

Twenty-three comments

Major molle

also known as major mole..A Highland Schottische (CMaj). Noted in Kerrs collection of Merry Melodies for violin

What’s a schottische?

Major Molle

A Schottische is a dance.

But it’s also a tune genre is it not?…like "reel" or "jig". How do you define it in that sense?

Schottische - Dance

This comes from a dance web site and may (or may not) clarify the issue.

"— In 1850, there appeared in all parts of Europe, the Schottische (shot-teesh), a round dance which had been executed in Bavaria under the name "Reinlander" (rine-lant-er). In the Rheinish (sp?) countries, the Schottische was known as the "Bavarian Polka". Two sisters from Odessa, returning from Hungary did a variation to the Rheinlander called the "Hungarian Waltz" which became very popular with all who saw.

— However, the word Schottische is from Germany, not Scotland, even though the
correct name of the dance is Scottish, (the Germans refereed to it as Schottische for some reason.)"(They are Germans after all, and if they didn’t invent it, they can rename it and call it their own.)

Initially these were written in 2/4 time but played slowly - there are some western (US) versions of this done as a round dance …

So it’s a dcance tune with a lumpy rhythm -

Major Molle

Jigs and reels are dances too.Don’t put the cart before the horse.

16 bars = Highland Fling

But hey, they all get mixed up in time and distance from the dances they used to accompany, Highland Flings, Highlands, Flings, Schottisches, Germans, Hornpipes. However, the 16 bars are the usual for the Highland Fling, which now by many survives as a single reel usually, sometimes as a double reel or even a double hornpipe. The dances, for 2, 3 and 4 dancers, also were on the whole 16 bars in length. The one thing they all did share was the basic traveling step, a ‘skip-change’, or what some call ‘hop-1-2-3’, however, the hop usually isn’t quite a hop but more of a skip, or just lifting the heel and dropping it down again, light and low to the ground - at least amongst what were considered the ‘better’ dancers, judged on experience, skill and consideration of others…including the musicians and the music…

Do a search on this site if you want more, using any of the key words - as given in the first paragraph…

Thankyou to those of you who made an effort to be genuinely helpful and answer my question.

Major Malley’s

This tune is also known as Major Malley’s, which has been recorded by the Battlefield Band on their excellent album, Home is Where the Van is. They do it as a march first, then as a reel. I really liked the march, great arrangement!

Posted by .

As played by Tom Dunne on A Tribute to Paddy Cronin in A dorian

Tom Dunne plays it beautifully on A tribute to Paddy Cronin in A dorian and he also reverses the parts, starting on the B section.
Here’s the abcs for that:

X: 1
T: Major Molle
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: reel
K:Ador
c2 B2|:AE (3EEE cBcd|AE (3EEE c2Bc|AE (3EEE cBcd|BGGB d2 cB|
AE (3EEE cBcd|AE (3EEE c2Bc|A2 e^f gfge|dBGB edcB||
||:A2 ed cBAG|A2 ed (3cdc (3BcB|A2 e^f gfge|dBGB edcB:||

Posted by .

The tune was first published by Nathaniel Gow in his 5th collection of 1809 as "Major Molle’s (of the 9th Regiment of Foot) Reel". Molle was a friend of Gow’s who had passed on tunes he’d collected for Gow to publish. Most likely Nathaniel Gow wrote it himself as a tribute. It predates the invention of the schottische by 30 years at least.

bobbi ~ it makes a certain sense, not just your key signature, but going from the low part into the high part. It fits nicely, whatever the historic order of the parts.

On the subject again of the schottische, spikes aside, it was part of a long evolution. I remember at least one Scott Skinner transcription where he’d added "strathspey" or "highland schottische" (fling). I tend to put such transcriptions more usually under ‘strathspey’, but a few times may have added them under ‘barndance’, a related dance from…

“Major Molle” ~ a small extract extracted from ‘The Fiddler’s Companion’

http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/MAIG_MAL.htm

The melody was known to Hardy as a reel or country dance tune, for it appears in his family manuscript collection of melodies used for dancing in Dorset. The Royal Scottish Country Dance Society gives that “Major Mole” as a strathspey can be used as an alternate tune for Tullochgorm. The tune was also rendered as a Highland Schottishe for dancing (see Kerr’s Merry Melodies), and as a march tune (See “Major Malley’s March”, as recorded by the Battlefield Band, who had it as a march from guitarist and fiddler Ged Foley. The band writes “although it is supposed to be from Devon [Ed.: from the Hardy Family manuscripts, where it is a reel], we harbour the suspicion that it might originally be Breton”).

C: Andrew Gow, 1760-1803 - the attribution

Andrew, the 2nd son of Niel Gow, first published as Jack Campin has give above, 1809. Curiously, this tune does not feature in the three volume publication "The Beauties of Niel Gow - The Compositions of Niel Gow and Sons", published by his son Nathaniel Gow in 1819, after his father’s death.

“Major Molle” / “Major Mole” - 1870 (1809) - 1884 - Kerr’s & “The Athole Collection”

X: 3
T: Major Mole
B: "Kerr’s First Collection of Merry Melodies", 1870-75, page 19: Highland Schottisches, tune #1
U: T = !trill!
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: highland schottische
K: Amin
|: A<ee>d c>dB>c | A<ee>d Tc2 B<c |\
A<ee>^f g>fg>e | d>BG>B e>dc>B :|
|: A<E E2 A>Ec>E | A<EE>E c2 B<c |\
A<EE>E e>^fg>e | d>BG>B e>dc>B :|

X: 4
T: Major Mole
B: "Kerr’s Second Collection of Merry Melodies",1870-75, page 9, tune #60
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: reel
K: Amin
|: Aeed cBA^G | Aeed c2 B2 |\
Aee^f gfge | dBGB edcB :|
|: AE E/E/E cAB^G | AE E/E/E c2 Bc |\
[1 AE E/E/E cABd | BGGB d2 cB :|\
[2 Aee^f gfge | dBGB edcB |]

X: 5
T: Major Molle
B: "James Stewart Robertson: The Athole Collection", 1884, page 45
S: Gow Bk. 5 ("Fifth Collection of Strathspey Reels", 1809)
U: T = !trill!
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: reel
K: Amin
c |:\
Aeed {A/B/}cBA^G | Aeed {A/B/}c3 B |\
Aee^f Tgf{f/}ge | {^c/}dB{^F/}GB ed{B/}cB :|
AE E/E/E {A/B/}cAB^G | AE E/E/E {A/B/}c2 Bc |\
AE E/E/E {A/B/}cABd | BGGB {^c/}d2 {B/}cB |
AE E/E/E {A/B/}cAB^G | AE E/E/E {A/B/}c2 Bc |\
Aee^f Tgf{f/}ge | {^c/}dB{^F/}GB ed{B/}cB |]

X: 6
T: Major Molle’s (of the 9th Regt. of Foot) Reel
B: "Gow’s Fifth Collection of Strathspey Reels", 1809
C: Andrew Gow 1760-1803, son of Neil Gow
N: ”This may be Played Slow”
U: T = !trill!
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: reel
K: Bmin
|: Bff>e dcB^A | Bff>e Td2 c2 |\
Bff>^g a/g/f/g/ af | ecAc {f/}e2 dc :|
B>F F/F/F dBc^A | B>F F/F/F ~d2 cd |\
B>F F/F/F dBce | cAA>c {f/}e2 dc |
B>F F/F/F dBc^A | B>F F/F/F ~d2 cd |\
Bff>^g a/g/f/g/ af | ecAc {f/}e2 dc |]

Here’s hoping Nigel Gatherer will add to the database a transcription for the march?

Major Molle’s, eh, lovely tune that, in all it’s incarnations. Thanks.

Major Malley’s March

Ceolachan said, "Here’s hoping Nigel Gatherer will add to the database a transcription for the march?"

Just home after a few days away, and I just happen to have notated that tune in one of my notebooks twenty years ago…

X:950
T:Major Malley’s March
T:Major Molle
C:Andrew Gow
S:Battlefield Band, Home Is Where the Van Is (1980)
Z:Nigel Gatherer
M:2/4
L:1/8
K:Am
DA A>G | FE DC | DA A>G | F2 E2 | DA A>B | cA/B/ cA | G>E CE | G2 FE :|
DA,- A,A,/A,/ | FD EC | DA, A,/A,/A, | F2 EF | DA, A,/A,/A, | FD EF | G>E CE | G2 FE |
DA,- A,A,/A,/ | FD EC | DA, A,/A,/A, | F2 EF | DA A>B | cA/B/ cA | G>E CE | G2 FE ||

Nigel, I meant on it’s own, in the database, feeling it is different enough. But it’s good to see it here too. Thanks, much appreciated…

Re: Major Molle

Recorded by Jerry Holland, superbly! Played in Cape Breton by Howie MacDonald, mostly.