Levantine’s Barrel barndance

Also known as The Bummer Reel, La Galope Lac St-Charles, The Levantine Barrel, Levantine’s Barrel, Peaches And Cream, The Tullamore Piper.

There are 5 recordings of this tune.

Levantine’s Barrel appears in 1 other tune collection.

Levantine's Barrel has been added to 18 tunebooks.

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Four settings

1
X: 1
T: Levantine's Barrel
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|: f>e |d>fA>d f2 f>e | d2 b>a ^g>a (3fed | c>eA>c e>Ac>e | d>ef>g a2 f>e |
d>fA>d f2 f>e | d2 b>a ^g>af>d | c>eA>c e>Ac>e |[1 d2 f2 d2 :|[2 d2 A2 D2 ||
|: (3FGA |B3 c d3 B | B>A^G>A F2 e>d | c>eA>c e>Ac>e | d>ef>g a3 A |
B2 c2 d2 c>B | B>A^G>A f3 d | c>eA>c e>Ac>e |[1 d2 A2 D2 :|[2 d2 f2 d2 |]
2
X: 2
T: Levantine's Barrel
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
BA|GBDG B2BA|GBed ^cdAG|FADF ADFA|GBed ^cd=cA|GBDG B2BA|
GBed ^cdAG|FADF ADFA|G2B2G2::d2|e2f2 g2fe|ed^cd B2AG|
FADF ADFA|GBed ^cdBG|e2f2 g2fe|ed^cd B2AG|FADF ADFA|G2B2G2:|
3
X: 3
T: Levantine's Barrel
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
fe|dfAd ~f3e|dfba gfed|ceAc eAce|defg ~a3f|
dfAd ~f3e|dfba gfed|ceAc eAce|1 def2 d2:|2 def2 d3||
|:A|~B3c d2cB|ABAE F2ed|ceAc eAce|defg ~a3f|
~B3c d2cB|ABAE F2ed|ceAc eAce|1 def2 d3:|2 def2 d2||
4
X: 4
T: Levantine's Barrel
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|: fe |dfAd f2 fe | d2 ba ^gafd | ceAc eAce | defg a2 fe |
dfAd f2 fe | d2 ba ^gafd | ceAc eAce | d2 f2 d2 :|
|: A2 |B2 Bc d2 cB | AB^GA F2 ed | c2 Ac eAce | d2 e/f/g a2 A2 |
B2 Bc d/e/d cB | AB^GA F4 | ceAc eAce | d2 f2 d2 :|

Eleven comments

Available in several flavours -

Here it is given with the ‘skip’ as a barndance or schottische. It is also played straight, for example as an ‘American’ reel for New England contra dancing. Some say it hails from P.E.I. - Prince Edward Island in the Canadian Maritimes. It has been played and used for dancing in North America, the USA and Canada, as well as in Scotland, England and Eire. It shows up in several collections, including:

‘Ryan’s Mammoth Collection’, 1884, also known as ‘1000 Fiddle Tunes’ and ‘Coles 1000 Fiddle Tunes’ - brought back into print courtesy of Mel Bay, 1996 - ‘Ryan’s Mammoth Collection: 1050 Reels and Jigs, and How to Play Them’, ISBN: 0786603003.

"The Don Messer Anthology of Favorite Fiddle Tunes" - a Canadian collection, also courtesy of Mel Bay, 1980…

‘The Portland Collection: Contra Dance Music in the Pacific Northwest’ by Susan Songer & Clyde Curley - ISBN 0-9657476-0-3.
http://www.theportlandcollection.com/

Levantine’s Barrel - that is the question?

I imagined first pickle of some variety, maybe soused fish, and then came to mind those mad folk who went over Niagara Falls in barrels. But I couldn’t find a ‘Levantine’ amongst that list of notables. If anyone has a story to share, or even a notion, please contribute it…

Barndances

Just wondered if someone could clarify the difference between a barndance and a hornpipe to me as both seem to be dotted and in 4/4. Does the difference lie mainly in the dancing itself? Just curious.

Jakki - it has been in discussion via several routes, Barndances/Schottisches/Germans/Hornpipes/Flings, including the Who/What/Where/When and How, and some Why too. You’ll find links to some of those discussions here:

https://thesession.org/members/11705

I’ll try to work on completing those links as I think I’ve missed a couple. Seeing your ‘Scottish’ connection my apologies beforehand if any ire with regards to certain things falling under that heading cause any agro. There’s a long history involved…

Variation

The second part in Cole’s is notated an octave higher than the version shown here. Years ago I found this setting to be an accessible intro to higher-position playing in D.

I’ve noticed that Texas-style American fiddlers play a version of this tune, calling it "Peaches and Cream".

Bummer’s Reel

An American Fife and Drum setting of this tune below. Also, technically, this should be a hornpipe based on phrasing — and it’s really cute and fun as a hornpipe (yes, I said "cute").

X:58
T:Bummer’s Reel
M:C
L:1/8
K:G
BA|GBDG B2BA|GBed ^cdAG|FADF ADFA|GBed ^cd=cA|GBDG B2BA|
GBed ^cdAG|FADF ADFA|G2B2G2::d2|e2f2 g2fe|ed^cd B2AG|
FADF ADFA|GBed ^cdBG|e2f2 g2fe|ed^cd B2AG|FADF ADFA|G2B2G2:|

Levantine’s Barrel

‘c’ mentions that this is also played as an American style straight reel or hornpipe type thing for the contra. This tallies with a version that has become popular at my local session. I learnt it off our piper, and he did state his source recording, but I’ve forgotten what it was. Glad to have a name for tune. Thanks ‘c’. Here’s a transcription of the way it get played in Sydney:

X: 1
T: Levantine’s Barrel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: reel
K: Dmaj
fe|dfAd ~f3e|dfba gfed|ceAc eAce|defg ~a3f|
dfAd ~f3e|dfba gfed|ceAc eAce|1 def2 d2:|2 def2 d3||
|:A|~B3c d2cB|ABAE F2ed|ceAc eAce|defg ~a3f|
~B3c d2cB|ABAE F2ed|ceAc eAce|1 def2 d3:|2 def2 d2||

I noticed the ‘octave’ mentioned above by ‘layers’ ~ it wasn’t uncommon for tunes like this to do that, or for two musicians to play an octave apart, another fun way to take it…

I suspect your friend’s source for the straight version given above is one of the contra dance recordings. That take on it is familiar… They tend to lengthen notes that way, 2’s and 3’s…embellished (i.e. rolled) or straight or staccoto… There is a tendency to emphasize the beat, so the 3’s are often played as 2’s:

| dfAd f2 fe | & | defg a2 af | & |2 de f2 d2||: A2 | & | B2 Bc d2 cB | & | de f2 d2 :|

The basic step is a walking step, two per measure, so the 3’s work fine too but the 2’s emphasize the step and the lift… It’s a great tune however you take it…deserves its popularity with musicians and dancers…

Levantine’s Barrel

Some may be interested to know that Levantine was a stage name used by Vaudeville performer Fred Proctor, a 19th century equilibrist and acrobat who was known to use a jeweled barrel in his act.
http://www.proctors.org/ff-proctor

Yes! Thanks Boots, appreciated…