The Guns Of The Magnificent Seven reel

Also known as Fintan McManus’s, The Guns, Return Of The Magnificent Seven.

There are 21 recordings of a tune by this name.

A tune by this name has been recorded together with The Windmill (lots of times), Tommy Peoples’ (a few times) and The Boys Of Malin (a few times).

The Guns Of The Magnificent Seven has been added to 12 tune sets.

The Guns Of The Magnificent Seven has been added to 383 tunebooks.

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Six settings

X: 1
T: The Guns Of The Magnificent Seven
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
|:EAA2 ABcA|EAFA GAEA|EAA2 ABcd|egdB BAA2:|
|:ABcd eAA2|gedB BAGB|ABcd eaaf|gedB BAA2:|
|:egdB A2|egdB GABd|eBdB Aa2f|gedB BAA2:|
X: 2
T: The Guns Of The Magnificent Seven
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
|egdb A2 eg|dBGA (3Bcd eB|dBAa4 f||gedB BAA2|
|1234 1(2)34|1234 1234|1234 (123)4|1234 123(4)|
# Added .
X: 3
T: The Guns Of The Magnificent Seven
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
|egdB GA (3Bcd|eBdB a3g|(3efg dB BAA2:|
|:(3/4) Am / / |(4/4) Am / G / | Am / Em / | Em / D / :|
X: 4
T: The Guns Of The Magnificent Seven
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
|:EAA2 ABcA|EAFA GAEA|EAA2 ABcd|egdB BAA2|
EAA2 ABcA|EAFA GAEA|EAA2 ABcd|egdB BAA2||
|:ABcd eAA2|gedB BAGB|ABcd eaaf|gedB BAA2|
ABcd eAA2|gedB BAGB|ABcd eaaf|gedB BAA2||
|:egdB A2|egdB GABd|eBdB A3f|gedB BAA2|
egdB A2|egdB GABd|eBdB A3f|gedB BAA2||
# Added by JACKB .
X: 5
T: The Guns Of The Magnificent Seven
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
|:EAAG ABcA|EGFA GEDG|EAAG A2B/c/d|e2dB BAAG:|
A2B/c/d e2AA|gedB BAAG|A2B/c/d eaaf|gAed BAAG|
ABcd e2AA|gedB BAAG|A2B/c/d e2af|gedB ABcd|
e2dB A2|e2dB G2B/c/d|e2dB a2eA|egdB BA B/c/d|
e2dB A2|e2dB G2B/c/d|e2dB a2zg|egdB BAAG||
X: 6
T: The Guns Of The Magnificent Seven
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
|: EAAG ABcA | EAFA GEED | EAAG ABcd | egdB BAA2 :|
|:ABcd eAA2 | gedc BGGB | ABcd eaaf | gedB BAA2 :|
|:egdB A2 | egdB GABd | eBdB Aa2g | egdB BAA2 :|

Thirty-six comments

This is an odd tune, but great fun to play, especially at high speed. It was written by bouzouki-player, Fintan McManus (http://zouki_1.tripod.com/).

No, that’s not a mistake at the start of the last part. It really does skip a beat like that. It might sound weird at first but once you get the hang of it, it really seems to fit.

For fiddlers, instead of constantly hopping to the open A string in the first part, try dragging the bow across both strings for variation.

Guns of the Magnificent Seven

I can remember hearing Fintan play this tune for us for the first time in Gary Hastings’ house in Portrush, county Antrim way, way back in the late 70s. Myself and Gary may have been responsible for giving the tune its name, though I always called it "Fintan McManus" reel. Years later, I was amazed to see it referred to by this title on a Seamus Egan recording. Such is the power of the oral tradition. I still call it after Fintan however.

The Guns of the Magnificent Seven

I know of a different tune that gos by this name which is a fun balls out A major tune. Anyway, who were the "Magnificent Seven"?

Is this a quiz?

"The Magnificent Seven" is a 1960 Western directed by John Ford. The movie starred Yul Brynner as a mercenary hired to protect a Mexican farming village from its annual invasion by bandit Eli Wallach. Elmer Bernstein ‘s wrote the theme music (you had to have heard the "Marlboro Man" commercials) Brynner’s character rounds up a bunch of (then) young unknowns — Charles Bronson, Steve McQueen, Horst Buchholz, Robert Vaughn, James Coburn, and Brad Dexter — to help him protect the town. Back then, everybody had their favorite of the seven. :) There were two sequels and a host of knock-offs. http://allmovie.com/cg/x.dll?p=avg&sql=A30854

It was based off the classic Japanese 1954 film "The Seven Samurai" directed by Akira Kurosawa. If you like movies, start with this one and then watch the other one to see what got changed. http://www.brightlightsfilm.com/17/10_samurai.html

Zina

Mag 7

I was thinking along the lines of the Gilford Four or the Birmingham Six. I wasn’t thinking along the lines of spaghetti western movies - that’s why it sounded familier, but couldn’t recall it.
Thanks

guns of the magnificent seven

Hi,
how is one to count the beat in the rythmically unusual part of the tune both for playing the melody and backing it.
thanx,
H

Posted by .

Re: guns of the magnificent seven

Listen to a recorded version and do what they do. See Altan’s Island Angel. first track. They call it Fintan McManus’.

Posted .

Re: guns of the magnificent seven

See also track 7 on "I won’t be afraid any more" by Nomos.

Re: guns of the magnificent seven

Oh aye, we had lots of fun with this tune in the old days when nobody played it except those of us who knew Fintan and had learned it from him. It was always a good laugh to watch what it did to unsuspecting accompanists. It caught them all no matter how good they were. More fun was to be had at melody players’ expense by slipping in a extra few notes at the end of the first part of "Rolling in the Ryegrass".

Re: guns of the magnificent seven

We’ve played this tune for a long enough time to have it go out of circulation and back in again. Even included it a a few gigs now and then, at peril of throwing ourselves off.

Here’s an approximation of the timing for the C part. The beats in parenthesis are sustained notes:

|egdb A2 eg|dBGA (3Bcd eB|dBAa4 f||gedB BAA2|
Counted:
|1234 1(2)34|1234 1234|1234 (123)4|1234 123(4)|

This should get you close enough, but listening and playing along is bound to be better than counting this out. Either slow the tape/cd down, or find someone who knows it and can play it slow and steady for you. Good luck.

Posted .

Re: guns of the magnificent seven

Seamus Egan does a nice job of it on banjo, on the 2nd track - same track as the Convenience Reel, on his first album, which he recorded when he was 16!

Will, I always thought the whole point of it being called "Guns Of The Magnificent Seven" was that it had a bar of 7 beats in the last part, split into 3+4. Because the top "a" in the 3rd bar is held on for 4 in your analysis, that beat isn’t skipped and it becomes normal 4/4 time - maybe it was a typo. I would analyse this as though a new bar starts everytime there is an "e" in the melody, so you get one bar of 3 beats and 3 bars of 4:

M: 3/4
|:egdB A2|
M: 4/4
|egdB GA (3Bcd|eBdB a3g|(3efg dB BAA2:|

So you could back it something like:
|:(3/4) Am / / |(4/4) Am / G / | Am / Em / | Em / D / :|

Or you could substitute Am chords for a major, making Amix for a change.

Mark, I learned the tune off someone who learned it from another who learned it…. I ended up playing my version along with an Altan recording of it, and the timing meshed with theirs, so I figured I was on the right track. It works out to be in 4/4 timing, but the beat moves around across the bars, sort of like a bluegrass shuffle bow pattern.

Your version also seems plausible, and no doubt people play it that way. I have no idea which is closer to Mr. McManus’ intent. Maybe Long Note can enlighten us.

Posted .

Origins of the Title

Peering back through the mists of time to the Gary Hastings’ house in Portrush, county Antrim, late 1970s, I believe I had happened to see this mediocre sequel to the classic western a day or two before I heard Fintan play the tune on the bouzouki for the first time. And I believe I boozily suggested it with Gary’s approval. I don’t remember us referring to it ourselves by that title. At least I didn’t call it that and I still don’t. And that’s how it got it’s name. Sorry, it’s as banal as that, though I must say I prefer Dow’s theory. Maybe I should not have revealed the truth when a much better truth was available. I got a New Year’s email from Fintan. He has been gigging with Peoples and Laurence Nugent and is working on a CD of his own compositions.

LongNote, I like all the deniability you built into that story—like you might not have been there at all, if it happened to be incriminating that you were indeed there, heh.

But does that mean you agree with the measure in 3/4 time? Or is it a roving beat, still in 4/4 time?

BTW, it’s good to know you’re still lurking out there. Post us a tune!

Posted .

First Recorded by Me?

Alas, Will, I am an illiterate with no musical schooling just about able to read the dots if I know what kind of tune I’ m looking at. So, I am unable to post tunes — just criticize those who do. Sure isn’t that the way of it? However, I have seen tunes on Norbeck’s site where I am quoted as the source. Also tunes from others who I am pretty sure learned them from me or private recordings provided by me. So, I have done a good wee bit of spreading the music around. A propos "The Guns", I can lay claim to being the first person ever to have recorded it under the title "Fintan McManus’ ". Way back in Jan or Feb 1983 with an Irish-Swedish band I was playing with. We privately produced a cassette of songs and tunes for sale at our gigs and set-dancing weekends. Even if I do say so myself, the music still holds up well after 20 years. We were a damned good band. We paired it with, as we called it, "Sweeney’s Dream" which we later discovered was actually called "Maudebawne Chapel". We were also the first to record, on the same tape, "The Miller of Draghan (Drohan)" and it was a very long time before I heard anyone else play that tune besides ourselves. They may have gotten it from us. I believe Frankie Gavin got the tune from our banjo player Jorgen Astner. I got "The Miller" from county Antrim fiddler Deirdre Shannon back in the late 70s.

Ahh, the Miller is a great tune, still not played enough. But it does get played even here in Montana USA. I learned it from a De Dannan record. Funny how far the ripples spread….

Posted .

I should quote my source for my version of the 3rd part: a minidisc recording of a flautist at a session in Melbourne, VIC. I hope I haven’t misled anyone about the timing etc…

Couting the Guns

I’ve been working on the Guns for a while now, and I think I have a reasonable solution for the C part (for bodhran players, anyway).
Count (with "and" in between each, parens implies emphasis)

(1)23 (1)234 (1)23 (12)345

The tricky part is not figuring out the measure of three, but how to get back on to the 4/4 timing after you play it as three. The final two measures are played in 4/4, but the accent in the third measure is on the one and then again around the 4 (it’s either the 4 or the "and" after the 4), so playing it as if there’s another measure of 3/4 and then a measure of 5/4 works better than 3/4 4/4 4/4 4/4 to my ear.

Just a thought.

Any one aware of the Mick Coyne album?

This tune is credited as syncopation??? I know it as MacManus’

But what is the correct name for the second tune in this set (its credited as magnificent 7…..but it isnt - I’m useless with names!
cheers

Guns Of The Magnificent Seven

I’ve been working on learning this Tune, does anyone know where the name came from? I know there was a movie with this name
BenS

Re: Guns Of The Magnificent Seven

well, I looked under the Tune search and got my answer
BenS

Re: Guns Of The Magnificent Seven

I believe that’s called ‘using your bleeping intitiative’, isn’t it ?

Re: Guns Of The Magnificent Seven

When I first Learnt it I Heard it called
THE GUNS OF NAVARONE.
http://www.soundlantern.com/UpdatedSoundPage.do?ToId=329&Path=GUNS+OF+NAVARONE.m
Have it here in my Sound Lantern,,
I even heard the great box player Paddy O’Brien ask for it from
us in Miltown by that name,,He said I’ll get that tune before I leave Here, {Miltown} = He likely did ,,lol..But then I heard my friends in ALTAN call it - The Guns Of The Magnificent Seven.
And its been that ever since,,See if that link works - if not post me you email and I’ll send it to you…
jim,,,

Re: Guns Of The Magnificent Seven

Its a Fintan McManus tune….He wrote it a few years back..He is a bouzouki player from Fermanagh in the North of Ireland. But now lives in Co.Cavan.

The band Nomos also did a nice version of the tune..

All the best,
Seanie McGrath.

Re: Guns Of The Magnificent Seven

There were 7 of us at the Willie Week. Since then we have sung nothing but "The Magnificent Seven". Altogether…..

Dant, dant,da-dant,………..

Re: Guns Of The Magnificent Seven

Seanie McGrath.
Thanks for this Imfo - Now I know this tunes sorce,,, Ta..!!
I can remember Fintan McManus when he Knocked
About with Carian Curran a girl Marie ?-concertina- Oh and Gabby,,
They use to play a lovely Low Jig then = Fintan’s ???
Now I only ever here it played up high or in a different Key,,
I liked those Fermanagh musicians ,, They where nice people
to be , with,,
jim..

Re: Guns Of The Magnificent Seven

Nice to get a good word about Fermanagh, lots of great musicians here, oh!, by the way, we’ve got a game on Sunday, we’re gonna win, we’re gonna stuff youse boys from orchardland. Its gonna be a Full Force Gael, Like A Hurricane or, to quote another Fintan tune, The Wind That Blows.

Re: Guns Of The Magnificent Seven

It gets played in Bmin round here (well 50 miles north), not sure where that development came from? Australia perhaps? I think the third part sounds stronger in Bmin, but that may be (is) a hopelessly subjective opinion.

Posted by .

Zina, The Magnificent Seven is not a John Ford’s film but a John Sturges

To Zina

It’s not a Ford’s movie but John Sturges

Re: The Guns Of The Magnificent Seven

I’ve been listening to the Altan recording, here’s my interpretation of this tune
X:1
T:The Guns Of The Magnificent Seven
T:The Fintan McManus Reel
M:4/4
L:1/8
R:reel
K:Ador
|: EAAG ABcA | EAFA GEED | EAAG ABcd | egdB BAA2 :|
|:ABcd eAA2 | gedc BGGB | ABcd eaaf | gedB BAA2 :|
|:egdB A2 | egdB GABd | eBdB Aa2g | eg dB BAA2 :|

The Guns Of The Magnificent Seven, X:6

This is what I hear when I listen to the Altan version