The Triumph barndance

Also known as Dorset Triumph, The Dorset Triumph, Northumberland Triumph, The Northumberland Triumph.

There are 7 recordings of a tune by this name.

The Triumph has been added to 14 tunebooks.

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Four settings

X: 1
T: The Triumph
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
a2 | eccA dBBG | Aaag gffa | eccA dBBG | A2 c2 A2 :|
z2 | [B2E2] e2 c2 e2 | [B2E2] e2 c2 e2 | BBBd ccce | c2 B2 A2 :|
z2 | c2 cd e2 c2 | B2 Bc d2 B2 | cBcd eagf | edcB A2 AB |
c2 cd fedc | B2 Bc edcB | c2 cd eagf | edcB Aagf |]
X: 2
T: The Triumph
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
ge || d2BG c2AF | G2gf efge | d2BG c2AF | GBAF GBge | dBGB cAFA | Ggfg efge | dBGB cAFA | GBAF G2G2 ||
A2Ac B2d2 | A2Ac B2d2 | A2Ac Bdge | dcBA G2GB | A2Ac B2d2 | A2Ac B2d2 | A2Ac Bdge | dcBA G2GA ||
B2Bc edcB | A2AB dcBA | B2Bd efge | dcBA G2GA | BABc edcB | AGAB dcBA | BGBd efge | dcBA G3 ||
g ||: dBBd cBcA | Ggfg e2eg | dBBd cBcA | GBAF G3 :||
B ||: A3c B2d2 | A3c B2d2 | A2c2 Bdge | dcBA G3 :||
A ||: B3d dcBA | B2d2 dcBA | B2d2 efge |1 dcBA G3:||2 fgaf agfe ||
B3d dcBA | B2d2 dcBA | GABc defg | fgaf g4 ||
B2B2 cBcA | G2e2 egfe | d2Bd cBcA | G2B2 G4 :||
A3c B2d2 | A3c B2d2 | A3c B2d2 | dcBA B2G2 | A2Ac B2d2 | A2Ac B2d2 | A2Ac B2d2 | dcBA G3 ||
A || B2Bc d2cB | A2Ab c2A2 | B2Bc d2g2 | dcBA G3A | B2Bc d2cB | A2AB c2A2 | B2Bc d2g2 | fdef g4 ||
# Added by hetty .
X: 3
T: The Triumph
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
ge|d2BG c2AF|G2gf efge|d2BG c2AF|GBAF GBge|
dBGB cAFA|Ggfg efge|dBGB cAFA|GBAF G2||
GB|A2Ac B2d2|A2Ac B2d2|A2Ac Bdge|dcBA G2GB|
Ad^cd Bd^cd|Ad^cd Bd^cd|AGAc Bdge|dcBA G2||
GA|B2Bd edcB|A2AB dcBA|B2Bd efge|dcBA G2GA|
BABd edcB|AGAB dcBA|BGBd efge|dcBA G2||
X: 4
T: The Triumph
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
z | G2 B2 ABcA | G2 g2 efge |d2 B2 dcBA | G2 B2 G4 |
d2 B2 dcBA |G2 g2 efge |d2 B2 dcBA | G2 B2 G3 |]
|: z | A3 c B2 d2 | A3 c B2 d2 | A3 c B2 d2 | dcBA B2 G2 |
A2 Ac B2 d2 | A2 Ac B2 d2 | A2 Ac B2 d2 | dcBA G3 :|
|: z | B2 Bc d2 cB | A2 AB cB A2 | B2 Bc d2 g2 | dcBA B2 G2 |
B2 Bc d2 cB | A2 AB cB A2 | B2 Bc d2 g2 | f2 ef g3 :|

Fourteen comments

Hmmmm, once again, from the SKye Collection.. WOULD’VE been my 6th, but no, my 5th.

It’s a country dance and I’m not sure if this would go under the barndance category.

Page 167, first tune.

Lovely tune indeed! I also made a slight change to the rests in the tune. In the book, they were 1/8th rests and that obviously doesn’t sound right, unless that’s the way they were really played back in the day >_>

Cheers and finally one of my own for tomorroW!!!
Armand

The Triumph

Also an old Scottish country dance to this tune. The RSCDS published it in its very first book of traditional dances. They list the tune with a date of 1797 from the "Aird" collection, and also in "The Ballroom, 1827" and Nathaniel Gow 1808.

I think you’re right about the rests.

Posted by .

The Dorset Triumph

This has found itself into the English tradition, both as a set country dance from Dorset, of which I have two versions, and as a morris dance from Bampton under the title ‘Step and Fetch Her’
Dorset Triumph No.1
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: G
ge || d2BG c2AF | G2gf efge | d2BG c2AF | GBAF GBge | dBGB cAFA | Ggfg efge | dBGB cAFA | GBAF G2G2 ||
A2Ac B2d2 | A2Ac B2d2 | A2Ac Bdge | dcBA G2GB | A2Ac B2d2 | A2Ac B2d2 | A2Ac Bdge | dcBA G2GA ||
B2Bc edcB | A2AB dcBA | B2Bd efge | dcBA G2GA | BABc edcB | AGAB dcBA | BGBd efge | dcBA G3 ||

Dorset Triumph no.2
also in ‘G’
g ||: dBBd cBcA | Ggfg e2eg | dBBd cBcA | GBAF G3 :||
B ||: A3c B2d2 | A3c B2d2 | A2c2 Bdge | dcBA G3 :||
A ||: B3d dcBA | B2d2 dcBA | B2d2 efge |1 dcBA G3:||2 fgaf agfe ||
Final time of playing the ‘C’ music is:-
B3d dcBA | B2d2 dcBA | GABc defg | fgaf g4 ||

Both of these are set country dance tunes, sorryb I cannot say who collected them or when.

Step and Fetch Her
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: G
B2B2 cBcA | G2e2 egfe | d2Bd cBcA | G2B2 G4 :||
A3c B2d2 | A3c B2d2 | A3c B2d2 | dcBA B2G2 | A2Ac B2d2 | A2Ac B2d2 | A2Ac B2d2 | dcBA G3 ||
A || B2Bc d2cB | A2Ab c2A2 | B2Bc d2g2 | dcBA G3A | B2Bc d2cB | A2AB c2A2 | B2Bc d2g2 | fdef g4 ||

I also have another version of ‘Step and Fetch Her’ as a country dance but with an interesting change of time signature at the end of the ‘A’ music. I’ve yet to find out how to do that in ABC.

Posted by .

The Triumph

The Triumph isn’t that old and isn’t Scotish. Its 19th Century and I think either English or American in origin. Certainly both the dance and tune are compositions rsather than things with their roots in the mists of time.
There was a big article about the dance and the music in FOLK MUSIC JOURNAL a few years ago - that would be 2002or 2001. I’ll do some homework and post again if anyone is interested.
Noel

The Triumph

Noel - I’d like to know more, particularly given the RSCDS notes. Perhaps this music and the dance weren’t associated until later? Thanks -

Cathy

Posted by .

More info please

would read your findings with interest Noel so look forward to them including any other variations to the tune no matter how small they may be.

Posted by .

The Triumph

The article I half remembered is by Christopher Walker in Folk Music Journal vol8. no3 (2001).

The earliest published version of the Triumph (including the tune we have here as well as dance notation ) was published in London in 1790 T WENTY FOUR COUNTRY DANCES FOR THE YEAR 1790. (Samuel, Ann & Peter Thompson,1790). Apparently there is a copy in the British Library at [BL:a.223.f.(12.)]

The aithors suggest that the tune was published then and that the tune diverged with a version by Campbell-Aird (published in Glasgow in 1796, with syncopation in the B part) becoming popular in England and a version by Gow (without B part syncopation ,as here, published in 1805) becoming popular in Scotand.

It would appear that the dance and tune are both pretty consistent with only minor variations in both. They are both completely associated. The tune has been used for other dances but in Scotland and throughout most of England, the tune was always played for the dance.

If you are really interested in varients, go to the FMJ article,but they are allmuch of a muchness.
Noel

The Triumph

Thanks, noelbats, for taking the time to look this up. It’s fun to see the common histories of tunes and dances and then find versions of them cropping up in all kinds of later places.

Posted by .

Saints Preserve Us - Pandora’s book of Playford prancin’ is open - - -

Let’s see, I think I’ve got at least over 500 ‘country dances’ hereabouts, actually, maybe over 1,000. I could probably spend the next few years just putting those on site here. I guess I could do a shight translation into Irish for the titles so they would fit something close to the main content of this site, or what I had once been told it was supposed to be - and more than once, that in the main it is ‘Irish’? Now, let’s see - where’s my Irish dictionary, what was Irish for ‘Triumph’, maybe I can even get a dialect version for it, let’s say Donegal, for real cred, eh? Hey Jimmy, you there, any ideas of something appropriate for this, and don’t worry, not everybody has a dictionary or is native. We could have a bit of fun with this…

BOMF! - Boring Old Man with Flu - - -

Apologies for being irrascible Armand, you know, from our talks, that I have more than dabbled in early music, quite like the stuff even, outside of the bone corsets, crinoline, lace, nd cod pieces - and other out of time thngs like digital watches…

I though you might like to know, me trying to make some kind of restitution to you, that amongst various activities I’ve been involved in, mostly healthy, ‘The Triumph’, one of those Coca-cola tunes of the period, was also played and danced in Eire, along with a load of other ‘country dances’, some of which had survived in living memory post WW II. Some would damn the English for that, but such spread of influence was across Europe and abroad. Of course, also, the greater body of what are called ‘ceili dances’ are from that tradition, though some would say otherwise and claim they just rose out of the Irish sod, or were in the blood from birth, instinct.

In the worst of this virus that’s on me, and having to put up with various bureaucratic shight as well at the moment, I came back to ‘TheSesh’ to see more stuff being shoe-horned into the category ‘barndance’. Also, with the huge swamp out there of music, who knows, the next category collecting here could be all those horribly ornate Victorian dance airs. I suppose, having also been cut a few times because, while we played certain unIrish things in sessions - they weren’t acceptable to the Lord of the manor here, Jeremy, I saw the gaping maw of early music showing itself here and that was scary. But hey, as said, ‘The Triumph’ is one of the ‘Coca-cola’ themes of its time, like "In The Fields of Frost and Snow". I wonder when that is going to show up on site. At least, realizing the currency of this particular tune and dance, all over hell, like Coke, it can be seen for what it is without the usual pretences and flurries usually associated with it, or so I can imagine under this ‘fever’. That won’t stop somebody from Baroque-ifying it to death…just try to hold back on that urge yourself. It is, after all, just another dance tune… I’ll do the same, once this flu is gone, and try not to be so reactionary… HA!

The Triumph

19th century "not that old"? 🙂

I have a photocopy of some dots for this tune, written in my school teacher’s handwriting. It’s entitled "Northumberland Triumph". I suppose we might have played it at some point but I don’t remember. The setting is very similar to the first one Hetty transcribed.

X: 1
T: The Triumph
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: country dance
K: Gmaj
ge|d2BG c2AF|G2gf efge|d2BG c2AF|GBAF GBge|
dBGB cAFA|Ggfg efge|dBGB cAFA|GBAF G2||
GB|A2Ac B2d2|A2Ac B2d2|A2Ac Bdge|dcBA G2GB|
Ad^cd Bd^cd|Ad^cd Bd^cd|AGAc Bdge|dcBA G2||
GA|B2Bd edcB|A2AB dcBA|B2Bd efge|dcBA G2GA|
BABd edcB|AGAB dcBA|BGBd efge|dcBA G2||

Note the similarity of the 1st part to that of The Bush In Bloom https://thesession.org/tunes/2472.

😏 ~ relativity

I think, unless my memory is failing, this predates the 1800s and is amongst the Playford collections… I’ll have a check. That’s where I’d have placed it, but hey, ‘old’ is relevant, and Playford isn’t that far back as far as the Jurassic is concerned…

18th Century ~ “Twenty Four Country Dances for the Year 1790”

Samuel, Ann & Peter Thompson,1790

From Noelbats, above: The earliest published version of the Triumph, including the tune we have here as well as dance notation, was published in London in 1790.

I may be confusing it with another from the Playford books, but intend to look further.

The Triumph, X:4

Setting as played at the Golden Guinea pub session, Bristol, UK.