Liz Kelly’s slide

Also known as The Barna, Conor Pass, Denis O’Keeffe’s, Dinny O’Keeffe’s, Dinny’s, Eibhlin Ni Riordáin, Eibhlin Ni Riordain’s, Eileen Ní Riordan’s, Eileen O’Riordan’s, Eileen Reardon’s, Eileen Riordan’s, Forget Your Troubles, Liz Kelly, Oakum’s, The Oakum, Ócam, Sé Oakum Mo Phriosúin, Tomy’s.

There are 28 recordings of a tune by this name.

A tune by this name has been recorded together with The Brosna (a few times), Denis Murphy’s (a few times), Going To The Well For Water (a few times), Kings Of Kerry (a few times) and Maidhc Dainnín Ó Sé’s (a few times).

Liz Kelly’s has been added to 4 tune sets.

Liz Kelly's has been added to 143 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Eight settings

X: 1
T: Liz Kelly's
R: slide
M: 12/8
L: 1/8
K: Amix
|:E2A ABA G2A B2d|e2A ABA G2E E2D|
E2A ABA G2A B2d|efe dcB A3 A2F:|
|:e2e efe d2d dcd|e2A ABA G2E F2D|
E2A ABA G2A B2d|efe dcB A3 A2c:|
X: 2
T: Liz Kelly's
R: slide
M: 12/8
L: 1/8
K: Amix
|: E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | e2 A ABA G2 A F2 G |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | efe dcB A3 A3 :|
|: e3 efe d3 c2 d | e2 A ABA G2 A F2 G |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | efe dcB A3 A3 :|
X: 3
T: Liz Kelly's
R: slide
M: 12/8
L: 1/8
K: Amix
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | e2 A B2 A GAG F2 G |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd |1 efe dcB A3 AGF :|2 efe dcB A3 Bcd ||
e3 edc d3 c2 d | e2 A B2 A GAG F2 G |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd |1 efe dcB A3 Bcd :|2 efe dcB A3 A3 ||
# Added by Kenny .
X: 4
T: Liz Kelly's
R: slide
M: 12/8
L: 1/8
K: Ador
|:G|E2A ABA G2A B2d|edB d2B A2G E2D|
E2A ABA G2A B2d|edB d2B A3 A2:|
d|e3 edB d3 dBd|edB d2B A2G E2D|
e3 edB d3 dBd|edB d2B A3 A2d|
e3 edB d3 dBd|edB d2B A2G E2D|
E2A ABA G2A B2d|edB d2B A3 A2||
X: 5
T: Liz Kelly's
R: slide
M: 12/8
L: 1/8
K: Amix
|: E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | edB d2 B A2 G E2 D |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | edB d2 B A3 A3 :|
|: e3 ed^c d3 dcd | e2 A ABA G2 A F2 G |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | edB d2 B A3 A3 :|
X: 6
T: Liz Kelly's
R: slide
M: 12/8
L: 1/8
K: Amix
|:E2A ABA E2A ABA|e2A ABA G2E F2D|
E2A ABA E2A A2c|e2c dcB A3 A3:|
|:e3 efe d3 c2d|e2A ABA G2E F2D|
E2A ABA E2A A2c|e2c dcB A3 A3:|
X: 7
T: Liz Kelly's
R: slide
M: 12/8
L: 1/8
K: Ador
|: A2 G |E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | efe d2 B A2 G E2 D |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | efe dcB A3 :|
|: Bcd |e3 efe d3 c2 d | e2 A B2 A G2 E F2 D |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | efe dcB A3 :|
X: 8
T: Liz Kelly's
R: slide
M: 12/8
L: 1/8
K: Amix
|:E2A ABA E2A ABA|e2A ABA G2A F2A|
E2A ABA E2A ABd|efe dcB A3 A3:|
|:efe edc d3 c2d|e2A ABA G2A F2A|
E2A ABA E2A ABd|efe dcB A3 A3:|

Forty-one comments

Learned from the lovely CD One More Time, recorded for the Culkin School of Dance, as played by Brendan Mulvihill. Because they play it rather slowly on the recording (for dancers just learning the single jig steps) and because of the relative simplicity of the melody, I’ve learned this one (along with Off She Goes) while teaching classes, whether I liked it or not and without any trying whatsoever.

Single jigs

I’ve listed this a slide. I know technically it’s a single jig but it’s the nearest category.

I’m sure there’s a difference between slides and single jigs but I haven’t figured it out yet. I’m hoping somebody can explain it to me.

Anyone? Anyone? Bueller? Anyone?

Are you kidding, I’ve only just worked out the diff between hops and slips. I think. :-p

Thanks, Jeremy!

BTW — look, look, Jeremy, I got the mode right the first time without asking anyone! :)

We’ve had that debate a few times, and if memory serves, came to the tentative conclusion that slides feature longer phrases and tend to end on a dotted quarter-quarter note couplet. Most trad "experts" I’ve read or heard on this subject say beyond the length of phrase (which is often a subjective matter) and ending rhythm, there are no real distinctions between single jigs and slides.

Posted .

Amen! - now we can pass the beans…

This is a really nice tune, a close variant of an old favourite… I’m surprised this hasn’t found its way here already, in some form. I have a few versions on this and will return with one…

Here’s another take on it., a simple variant. I haven’t gone through all my notes yet for alternate names but will add these as and if I ever find them…

|: E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | e2 A ABA G2 A F2 G |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | efe dcB A3 A3 :|
|: e3 efe d3 c2 d | e2 A ABA G2 A F2 G |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | efe dcB A3 A3 :|

Isn’t a single Jig a different thing to dancers and musicians? The speed we normally play "jigs" is more what the dancers would consider a single jig, whereas the double jig is danced at a pace so slow that most Trad musicians have trouble playing it that slow.

A single jig is a kind of dance, yes, but like jigs and reels and such, the music can be played at any speed. As it happens, the single jig IS danced quite quickly — it’s probably the most traditional of all the dances as currently danced under the commission. I believe Helen Brennan posits that it’s descended from the moneen jig, which I don’t believe anyone now knows what it looked like.

It’s played as part of a set of slides on the Meitheal CD by Seamus Begley and Steve Cooney

Is it called Liz Kelly’s there too, Conán?

Single jigs

I heard that the double jig was quite a late development and designed for step dancers - the step was danced on one foot (one foot leading) but dancers liked to show that they could dance a mirror image of the step and danced it off the other foot. So; one step - one foot = once through. One step - rght and left foot = twice through. Therefore a double jig

… Reels

and of course the same for reels

Eileen O’Riordan’s

From John Skelton’s playing on the first "Shegui" album. Used to love playing this for RonP’s wife’s set dancing class in Aberdeen - sadly demised - the class , that is.

Posted by .

Eileen O’Riordan’s

PHEW - that’s a relief Kenny - it wouldn’t say much for our marriage if I hadn’t noticed!

Posted by .

I think this is a slightly different version of what Zina posted as Liz Kelly’s: https://thesession.org/tunes/4176 I know a very similar tune and am wondering if I should post it.

Duplicated

Well spotted, “slainte”. Zina has indeed posted this tune before me, although I found the tune under the title “Eileen O’Riordan’s” on several websites, but nowhere else is it called “Liz Kelly’s”.

Posted by .

The same for all of them, Alan! I dunno about that theory. The reasons I don’t know about that is that one, in some of the other forms of Irish stepdancing (Connemara, for instance), they dance one long step of 16 bars, there’s no right or left foot, (as there is in Munster or southern style dancing, which is what a large number of Irish stepdancers dance) and two, the reason that the dance is known as both the double and treble jig is the same reason the little double tap of the tap under the foot is called both a double or a treble (or a rally, or a shuffle).

P.s.

Conán! Answer the question! :)

VERY well spotted, slainte-san! I got the tune name off of Mulvihill and McComiskey’s album One More Time. Since they’re both "named" type titles, my bet is that neither of us has it right, Kenny! :)

P.p. S.

What IS it about single jigs that stir up so much comment, anyway?

Suppose so..

Very possibly, Zina. Did the McComiskey/Mulvihill sleeve notes have anything to say about where they got the tune from? There wasn’t any information on "Shegui"’s album.

Posted by .

Not a word. Conan says he thought it was on another album which I don’t have, so I’ve asked him to tell us what name they used for it. I rather assume that either Mulvihill or McComiskey got the tune from Liz Kelly. :)

Oakum (slide)

This slide is again from Harry Bradley and Paul O’Shaughnessy’s flute duet playing. It is very similar to the tune which was already posted as "Eileen O’Riordan’s" and "Liz Kelly’s" on this site. I’m still not sure if this is worth posting or merely duplicated, but please note it’s in a little bit different key and has a slightly different structure.

It seems the word "Oakum" comes from the title of a song called "Sé Oakum Mo Phriosúin," which has a similar melody. I’ve no idea what it means.

Same as Eileen O’Riordan’s

Look further down the same page of tune listings for another version titled "Eileen O’Riordan’s."

Oakum was hemp rope bits mixed with tar and used for ship caulking. Picking apart old rope to make oakum was prison work.

Just learned this from my pipe teacher. He also says it comes from the song "Sé Oakum Mo Phriosúin". The song title means "Oakum is My Prison" in English.

Posted by .

Going back to this discussion after missing out on naming the CD 4 years ago!
It has since appeared in the automatic list of CDs with the tune - Meitheal by Seamus Begley and Steve Cooney

Eileen O’Riordan’s

What Kenny has posted here is exactly as I got it direct from Eileen when she was in London about 1980.

All the best

Brian x

From Mudcat:
Tomás Ó Lochlainn was born in 1903 in Bun a’ Charnáin near an Trá Bháin in Conamara. He died in 1965 and is buried in the cemetery at an Trá Bháin. Ócam an Phríosúin is one of a number of Tam Neaine Choilm’s compositions; it is said that his poetic abilities were recognized while he was at primary school. Not many years after Tomás left school, he was arrested – along with his stepfather – for illegally distilling póitín, and was sentenced to three months in prison. Much of his time in prison was spent picking oakum, an occupation which inspired this song. Interestingly, the justice, Seán Forde, agreed to stagger the sentences of the two men so that at least one man would be at home to support the family.

Ócam An PhrÍosÚin

Molaim sú an ghráin eorna go deo deo ‘gus a choíche
Nach mairg nach mbíonn tóir ar Rí Seoirse ar a dhéanamh
Seán Ford a bheith ina ghiúistis, is chomhairleodh na daoine
Mar is chuir mise ag foghlaim le ócam a spíonadh

Is randa dideloram ‘sé ócam an phríosúin
Go bhfága sú an ghráin eorna na hÓglaigh dá spíonadh

Is nach mise a bhíonn go brónach gach Domhnach is lá saoire,
‘mo sheasamh amuigh sa ghairdín, istigh i bhfáinne is mé ag gabhail timpeall
Go dtagann ó mo shúile sruth deor nuair a smaoinim
Gur olc an obair Domhnaigh bheith i gcónaí ar an gcaoi seo

Is randa dideloram ‘sé ócam an phríosúin
Go bhfága sú an ghráin eorna na hÓglaigh dá spíonadh

Is osclaíodh dom an stór a raibh ócam thar maoil ann
Is thug mé lán mo ghabhlach liom, mo dhóthain go ceann míosa,
Is nach mise a bhain gáire as an ngarda a bhí i mo thimpeall
Nuair a d’fhiafraigh mé den cheannfort cé air ar fhás an fianach

Is randa dideloram ‘sé ócam an phríosúin
Go bhfága sú an ghráin eorna na hÓglaigh dá spíonadh

Bhí mise maidin shamhraidh is mo leaba déanta síos agam
Nuair a chonaic mé an ceannfort ‘s é ag gluaiseacht go dtí mé.
”Is b’in é an chaoi a bhfuil tusa, is an méid atá le dnamh?
do dhá lámh i do phóca is ócam le spíonadh?”

Is randa dideloram ‘sé ócam an phríosúin
Go bhfága sú an ghráin eorna na hÓglaigh dá spíonadh

Céard a deir tú le Mac Uí Lochlainn a chuaigh a chodladh dó go suaimhneach,
Nuair a d’ionsaigh na luchain a chuid ícaim san oíche.
Is maidin lá arna mhárach, bhí an ceannfort á inseacht
ó, a dhiabhail, a deir an gobharnóir, ”tá an diabhail uilig déanta.”

Is randa dideloram ‘sé ócam an phríosúin
Is nach bhfága sú an ghráin eorna na hÓglaigh dá spíonadh

“Ócam” / “Oakum”

X: 2
T: Ócam
T: Oakum
M: 12/8
L: 1/8
R: slide
K: AMix
|: E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | edB d2 B A2 G E2 D |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | edB d2 B A3 A3 :|
|: e3 ed^c d3 dcd | e2 A ABA G2 A F2 G |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | edB d2 B A3 A3 :|

X: 3
T: Ócam
T: Oakum
M: 12/8
L: 1/8
R: slide
K: AMix
|: A2 G |\
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | efe d2 B A2 G E2 D |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | efe dcB A3 :|
|: Bcd |\
e3 efe d3 c2 d | e2 A B2 A G2 E F2 D |
E2 A ABA G2 A Bcd | efe dcB A3 :|

Thanks to those who gave information about the composition of the song, that’s fascinating stuff, have been playing it for years in ignorance of the background of the tune, one of my favourites

Of the three similar tunes mentioned here, this is the only one that is set in ‘pure’ pentatonic (w 3rd and 6th degrees of the mixolydian mode missing)

I’ve added the setting that Seamus Begley plays on Meitheal. (X:3)

Eibhlin Ni Riordáin’s

X:2 Music for the Sets, Vol. 4 - Call the Tune, Ronan Browne and Paul McGrattan.