Bó Mhín Na Toitean strathspey

Also known as Bó Mhín Na Toitean Highland Fling, Doherty’s March, Highland Lassie Going To The Fair, The Highland Lassie Going To The Fair, John Doherty’s, John Doherty’s March, Johnny Doherty’s March, March Of The Meena Toiten Bull, Untitled March.

There are 22 recordings of a tune by this name.

A tune by this name has been recorded together with Mother’s Delight (a few times).

Bó Mhín Na Toitean has been added to 5 tune sets.

Bó Mhín Na Toitean has been added to 154 tunebooks.

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Eight settings

X: 1
T: Bó Mhín Na Toitean
R: strathspey
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
A2 e2 e2 dB|d2 ef ge a2|A2 e2 e2 dB|eg ed BA GB|
A2 e2 e2 dB|d2 ef ge a2|eg ed e/f/g ed|B2 A2 A2 BG:|
A2 a2 a2 ge|d2 ef ge a2|A2 a2 a2 ge|dg ed BA GB|
A2 a2 a2 ge|d2 ef ge a2|eg ed e/f/g ed|B2 A2 A2 BG:|
X: 2
T: Bó Mhín Na Toitean
R: strathspey
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 e2 e2 dB | g2 ed B2 AG |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB e/f/e fd | ef dB A3 G |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 e2 e/f/e dB | g2 ed B/c/B AG |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB g2 ed | B2 A2 A2 ||
A2 a2 a2 ge | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 a2 a2 ge | dg ed B/c/B A2 |
A2 a2 a2 ge | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB g2 ed | B/c/B A2 A2 :|
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ed B2 A2 |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB g2 ed | B2 A2 A2 BG |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 e2 e2 dB | g2 ed B2 AG |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB g2 ed | B2 A2 A2 ||
A2 a2 a2 ge | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 a2 a2 ge | dg ed B/c/B A2 |
A2 a2 a2 ge | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB g2 ed | B/c/B A2 A2 :|
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 e2 e2 dB | g2 ed B2 AG |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB e2 fd | ef dB A3 G |]
X: 3
T: Bó Mhín Na Toitean
R: strathspey
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
|:A2 e2 !roll!e2 dB|d2 ef ge !slide!a2|A2 e2 !roll!e2 dB|eg ed !roll!B2 AG|
A2 e2 !roll!e2 dB|d2 ef ge !slide!a2|eg ed (3efg ed|B2 A2 {c/}A2 BG:||
|:A2 a2{c'/}a2 ge|d2 ef ge !slide!a2|A2 a2 {c'/}a2 ge|dg ed !roll!B2 AG|
A2 a2 {c'/}a2 ge|d2 ef ge !slide!a2|eg ed (3efg ed|B2 A2 {c/}A2 BG:||
X: 4
T: Bó Mhín Na Toitean
R: strathspey
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmix
|:D2A2 A2GE | G2 AB cA d2 | D2A2 A2GE | dcAG EAGE |
D2A2 A2GE | G2 AB cA d2 | cAGE AcGE | E2 D2 DE =FE :||
|:D2 d2 d2 cA | G2 AB cA d2 | D2d2 d2cA | dcAG EAGE|
D2d2 d2cA | G2 AB cA d2 | cAGE AcGE |E2 D2 DE =FE :||
# Added by JACKB .
X: 5
T: Bó Mhín Na Toitean
R: strathspey
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Edor
|:E2B2 B2AF | A2 Bc dB e2 | E2B2 B2AF | edBA FBAF |
E2B2 B2AF | A2 Bc dB e2 | dBAF BdAF | F2 E2 EF =GF :||
|:E2 e2 e2 dB | A2 Bc dB e2 | E2e2 e2dB | edBA FBAF|
E2e2 e2dB | A2 Bc dB e2 | dBAF BdAF |F2 E2 EF =GF :||
# Added by JACKB .
X: 6
T: Bó Mhín Na Toitean
R: strathspey
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmix
|:G2d2 d2cA | c2 de fd g2 | G2d2 d2cA | gfdc AdcA |
G2d2 d2cA | c2 de fd g2 | fdcA dfcA | A2 G2 GA =BA :||
|:G2 g2 g2 fd | c2 de fd g2 | G2g2 g2fd | gfdc AdcA|
G2g2 g2fd | c2 de fd g2 | fdcA dfcA |A2 G2 GA =BA :||
# Added by JACKB .
X: 7
T: Bó Mhín Na Toitean
R: strathspey
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Amix
|:A2e2 e2dB | d2 ef ge a2 | A2e2 e2dB | aged BedB |
A2e2 e2dB | d2 ef ge a2 | gedB egdB | B2 A2 AB =cB :||
|:A2 a2 a2 ge | d2 ef ge a2 | A2a2 a2ge | aged BedB|
A2a2 a2ge | d2 ef ge a2 | gedB egdB |B2 A2 AB =cB :||
# Added by JACKB .
X: 8
T: Bó Mhín Na Toitean
R: strathspey
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ador
A2 e2 e2 dB|d2 ef ge a2|A2 e2 e2 dB|de dB GA BG|
A2 e2 e2 dB|d2 ef ge a2|ge de g2 ed|B2 A2 A2 z2:|
a2 a2 a2 ge|d2 ef ge a2|a2 a2 a2 ge|dg ed BA GB|
a2 a2 a2 ge|d2 ef ge a2|ge de g2 ed|B2 A2 A2 z2:|

Twenty-two comments

Bó Mhín Na Toitean (highland)

Source: Altan - local ground
Transcription: gian marco pietrasanta

Question: Ador or Amix?

Mixolydian

I reckon mixolydian, gian marco, because I’m pretty sure this is based on a Scottish bagpipe tune.

Posted by .

Neither?

How about A-ind ( A indeterminate)? :-) Without a third in the scale, we can’t fairly accuse it of being either dorian or mixo. I wonder if there really is a name for it.

“Bó Mhín Na Toitean Highland Fling” ~ A Dorian

There are problems with this transcription, but it is well gnawed away at bare bones. As a highland fling the parts would not repeat, the grand total being 16 bars. This also clarifies itself in the repetitive nature of the melody. Also, with regards to the discussion about key, it is played other ways and notes are picked up in the variations, including ‘C’. For example, taking just one bar, #4 of Part-B, here’s another simple take on it:

| d>ge>d (3cBA B>G | ~ I think that might settle it, as this would be C natural…

Indeterminate? ~ ;-) I like that…

Bo Mhin na Toitean

Min na Toitean is atownland in N.W. Donegal. Johnny Doherty gave this tune which is a great variation of The Highland Lassie going to the Fair, the title of the cow and an equally good take on the Drunken Piper he titled the March of the Min na Toitean Bull. He probably heard them from older piping relatives and put his own unique stamp ,and names on them..

Does anyone know what the name translates to in English, I have nothing against Gaelic names but Bo Mhin Na Toitean is quite a mouthful

“Bó Mhín Na Toitean” = “Barbecued Beef” :-/

The Mhín Na Toitean Cow

Bó = cow

Mhín Na Toitean = a geographic placename, County Donegal

toitean = toit = smoke

& with tóiteán = dóiteán = fire, conflagration, if you were desperate for something else you could always call it "Barbecued Beef"…

“John Doherty, Master Fiddler of Donegal: Bundle And Go”

https://thesession.org/recordings/display/344

track 21: untitled march = "Johnny Doherty’s March"

There are several different ‘untitled’ (gan ainm) marches that people learned from Johnny Doherty’s playing that have since acquired the same title ~ "Johnny Doherty’s March". Some people have even given them numbers, No. 1 & No. 2 for example…

Johnny Doherty’s take on it, as a march ~

"John Doherty, Master Fiddler of Donegal: Bundle And Go"
track 21: untitled march = "Johnny Doherty’s March"

X:
T: untitled march / Johnny Doherty’s March
S: "John Doherty, Master Fiddler of Donegal: Bundle And Go", track 21
K: A Dorian
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
Q: 2/2, 1/2 = 105 – 110 bpm
R: march
A4- |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 e2 e2 dB | g2 ed B2 AG |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB e/f/e fd | ef dB A3 G |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 e2 e/f/e dB | g2 ed B/c/B AG |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB g2 ed | B2 A2 A2 ||
|: BG |
A2 a2 a2 ge | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 a2 a2 ge | dg ed B/c/B A2 |
A2 a2 a2 ge | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB g2 ed | B/c/B A2 A2 :|
BG |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ed B2 A2 |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB g2 ed | B2 A2 A2 BG |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 e2 e2 dB | g2 ed B2 AG |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB g2 ed | B2 A2 A2 ||
|: BG |
A2 a2 a2 ge | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 a2 a2 ge | dg ed B/c/B A2 |
A2 a2 a2 ge | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB g2 ed | B/c/B A2 A2 :|
BG |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | A2 e2 e2 dB | g2 ed B2 AG |
A2 e2 e2 dB | d2 ef ge a2 | ge dB e2 fd | ef dB A3 G |]

This is part answer to a request, one recieved by a member here while I’m in the midst of computer troubles. I’ll follow this later with a transcript for a highland fling take on it, as requested, but felt it would be best to start with Donegal and one of it’s favoured sons…

Bó Mhín Na Toitean ~ K: D Dorian ~ K: E Dorian ~ K: A Dorian ~

Other keys this finds its voice in ~ and as usual I tend to favour the lower takes…

You’ve got your work cut out making this one into a fling, ‘c’!

Bagpipe strathspey / tuning

i adore the fierceness of this tune, as with many other strathspeys. since there is no natural "C" (D flat) that can be capacitated on the bagpipe scale, only "C sharp" (D) , and indeed this is very much a bagpipe tune of origin, then i must agree with the more "indeteminate" label for the tune, given the drones being in "A" (B flat). if the C sharp of the scale were given, i would say most definitely Mixolydian. the pentatonic nature of the tune gives an indication of its antiquity. i know that there are other versions written out that have a "C" in them, but in its purest form it is pentatonic, very obviously omitting any C or C sharp.

Pronunciation ?

The meaning of the gaelic is impenetrable enough, but what about how to pronounce it ? I’m guessing -

’ Bo- veen-nah….", but the last word ?

And ceolachan, what does "mhin’ mean - in the context of the sentence that is ?

Roughly "Toy chen" I think

"what does "mhin’ mean - in the context of the sentence that is ?"

Usually, meen, mine, min, mín or aspirated mhín in place names means a ‘smooth’ place - such as a smooth area on a hill, or a meadow. As for ‘toitean’: In Scots Gàidhlig it can mean more than just smoke or vapour - it could mean a piece of flesh, a steak or chop, a rick of corn, moles (on the skin) or a ‘small heap’ etc. Most likely it can be used similarly in Irish. A trip to Meenatotten might help you to work out its meaning.

I also learned it as….

March of the Meena Toiten Bull…must have been an Americanized version of the English translation of the Northern Irish title of the tune. Anyway, the fiddler I accompanied adored Mr. Doherty and his music.

Min A Toteen Bull

From the playing of the band FullSet

Posted by .

Not The Drunken Piper

This tune is no The Drunken Piper but a clan march.

Posted by .

Bo Mhin Na Toitean, X:8

As played by David Hill at Center for Irish Music, St. Paul, Minnesota.