An T-Eas hornpipe

Also known as The Cascades, Waterfall.

There are 9 recordings of a tune by this name.

An T-Eas has been added to 26 tunebooks.

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Two settings

X: 1
T: An T-Eas
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
|:ed|cdec Aaga|fgaf e_ef=e|dBed cAdc|Be_e=e gfed|
cdec Aaga|fgaf e_ef=e|dBed cAdc|BGcB A2:|
GA|Be~ee cede|_e=efa gefg|agfe _e=efg|fedc BAGA|
Be~ee cede|_e=efa gefg|agfe _e=efa|gfe_e =e/2f/2e_e=e|
Be~ee cede|_e=efa gefg|agfe _e=efg|fedc BAGA|
Be~ee cede|_e=efa gefg|agfe _e=efa|gfe_e e2z2|
X: 2
T: An T-Eas
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
|:ed|cdec Aaga|fgaf e^dfe|dBed cAdc|Be^df gfe=d|
cdec Aaga|fgaf e^dfe|dBed cAdc|BGcB A2:|
GA|Be~ee cede|^defa gefg|agfe ^defg|fedc BAGA|
Be~ee cede|^defa gefg|agfe ^defa|gfe^d e/2f/2e^de|
Be~ee cede|^defa gefg|agfe ^defg|fedc BAGA|
Be~ee cede|^defa gefg|agfe ^defa|gfe^d e2z2|

Five comments

Donegal hornpipe

Composed by John Mhosaí MacFhionnlaoich on hearing the sound of a waterfall at Log na d-truain. I got this from the Fiddle Music of Donegal CD volume 1. The transcription doesn’t come close to doing it justice especially when you hear Mick Brown’s subtle and tasteful rendition. The ABC plays (just about).

It makes more sense to write the Eb as a D# as there are already 3 sharps in the key signature. Here it is written as such for cutting and pasting

T: An T-Eas
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: hornpipe
K:Amaj
|:ed|cdec Aaga|fgaf e^dfe|dBed cAdc|Be^de gfed|
cdec Aaga|fgaf e^dfe|dBed cAdc|BGcB A2:|
GA|Be~ee cede|^defa gefg|agfe ^defg|fedc BAGA|
Be~ee cede|^defa gefg|agfe ^defa|gfe^d e/2f/2e^de|
Be~ee cede|^defa gefg|agfe ^defg|fedc BAGA|
Be~ee cede|^defa gefg|agfe ^defa|gfe^d e2z2|

When you listen to your version in an ABC player, the last note in the 4th bar is sharp, though. My transcription is correct based on the performance.

Sorry about that. I wasn’t trying to present a more correct version, just a different way to write the notation.
Here I have corrected the error you pointed out

X:1
T: An T-Eas
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: hornpipe
K:Amaj
|:ed|cdec Aaga|fgaf e^dfe|dBed cAdc|Be^de gfe=d|
cdec Aaga|fgaf e^dfe|dBed cAdc|BGcB A2:|
GA|Be~ee cede|^defa gefg|agfe ^defg|fedc BAGA|
Be~ee cede|^defa gefg|agfe ^defa|gfe^d e/2f/2e^de|
Be~ee cede|^defa gefg|agfe ^defg|fedc BAGA|
Be~ee cede|^defa gefg|agfe ^defa|gfe^d e2z2|

Is it possible that the Eb is actually a stopped E played with the 4th finger? My fiddle teacher told me to do that for some tunes (like Casey’s Highland). When trying to slowly work my way through the tune from the sheet music here I tried it both ways (playing the Eb and playing an E with 4th finger) and I personally feel that the 4th finder E sounds closer to what I hear in Mick Brown’s recording. Apparently they use the 4th finger quite often in Donegal and this is one of the many ways in which they use it.