The Queen Of Sluts reel

The Queen Of Sluts has been added to 45 tunebooks.

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One setting

X: 1
T: The Queen Of Sluts
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
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|:e2 cA e2 cA|Bcde dcBA|AFGA Bcde|1dcBc d2 cd:|2dcBc d2d2||

Ten comments

From Brian McNeiil’s album "Monksgate".Not a very p.c. title,but who cares?

Not to worry!
I know an Irish man who dubbs himself the Queen of Sluts and mean well!

I remember playing this at school. I’ve always loved the name!

What kind of school did you go to?

The original meaning of slut is someone who is slovenly and untidy I believe. The sexual connotation is more recent.

From the Online Etymological Dictionary.
1402, "a dirty, slovenly, or untidy woman," probably cognate with dialectal Ger. Schlutt "slovenly woman," dialectal Swed. slata "idle woman, slut," and Du. slodder "slut," but the ultimate origin is doubtful. Chaucer uses sluttish (c.1386) in ref. to the appearance of an untidy man. Also "a kitchen maid, a drudge" (c.1450; hard pieces in a bread loaf from imperfect kneading were called slut’s pennies, 18c.). Meaning "woman of loose character, bold hussy" is attested from c.1450; playful use of the word, without implication of loose morals, is attested from 1664.

"Our little girl Susan is a most admirable slut, and pleases us mightily." [Pepys, diary, Feb. 21, 1664]

Sometimes used 19c. as a euphemism for bitch to describe a female dog. There is a group of North Sea Gmc. words in sl- that mean "sloppy," and also "slovenly woman," and that tend to evolve toward "woman of loose morals" (cf. slattern, also Eng. dial. slummock "a dirty, untidy, or slovenly person," 1861; M.Du. slore "a sluttish woman").

Queen of Sluts

This is in one of the Northumbrian Pipers books though it is not played much up here these days. I think the original was published in the Vickers collection.

Angels of the North do play it as a Northumnbrian Reel but some other competent players prefer to slow it down and bouce it more so it comes out as a schottische.
Noel

Old Poem with ABOVE Title in it

An excerpt from the poem below with the title in it?

The king of Knaves, and Queen of Sluts
Reign there in peace and quiet;
You need not fear to starve your guts,
There is such store of dyet:
There may you live free from all care,
Like hogs set up a fat’ning;
The garments which the people wear
Is silver, silk and satin.

THE WHOLE IN CONTEXT from:
http://www.csufresno.edu/folklore/Olson/SONGTXT1.HTM

An Invitation to Lubberland

with

An Account of the great Plenty of that Fruitful Country

There is all sorts of Fowl and Fish,
With Wine and store of Brandy;
Ye have there what your hearts can wish:
The Hills are Sugar-Candy

To the tune of: Billy and Molly [lost] or, The Journey-man
Shoemaker [Daniel Cooper].

This may be Printed: R[ichard]. P[ocock]. [1685-1688]

There is a ship, we understand,
Now riding in the river;
‘Tis newly come from Lubberland, [Rumbelo?]
The like I think was never;
You that a lazy life do love.
I’d have you now go over,
They say the land is not above
Two thousand leagues from Dover.

The captain and the master too,
Do’s give us this relation,
And so do’s all the whole ship’s crew,
Concerning this strange nation:
"The streets are pav’d with pudding-pies,
nay, powder’d-beef and bacon,
They say they scorn to tell you lies:’
Who thinks it is mistaken.

The king of Knaves, and Queen of Sluts
Reign there in peace and quiet;
You need not fear to starve your guts,
There is such store of dyet:
There may you live free from all care,
Like hogs set up a fat’ning;
The garments which the people wear
Is silver, silk and satin.

The lofty buildings of this place
For many years have lasted;
With nutmegs, pepper, cloves, and mace,
The walls are there rough-casted,
In curious hasty-pudding boil’d,
And most ingenious carving;
Likewise they are with pancakes ty’d,
Sure, here’s no fear of starving.

The captain says, "In every town,
Hot roasted pigs will meet ye,
They in the streets run up and down,
Still crying out, Come eat me",
Likewise, he says, "At every feast,
The very fowls and fishes,
Nay from the biggest to the least,
Comes tumbling to the dishes.

"The rivers run with claret fine,
The brooks with rich canary,
The ponds with other sorts of wine,
To make your hearts full merry:
Nay, more than this, you may behold,
The fountains flow with brandy,
The rocks are like refined gold,
The hills are sugar candy.

"Rose-water is the rain they have,
Which comes in pleasant showers,
All places are adorned brave,
With sweet and fragrant flowers.
Hot custards grows on ev’ry tree,
Each ditch affords rich jellies;
Now if you will be ruled by me,
Go ther and fill your bellies.

"There’s nothing there but holy-days
With music out of measure;
Who can forbear to speak the praise
Of such a land of pleasure?
There may you lead a lazy life
Free from all kind of labours:
And he that is without a wife,
May borrow of his neighbour.

"There is no law nor lawyer’s fees
All men are free from fury,
For ev’ry one do’s what he please,
Without a judge or jury:
The summer-time is warm they say,
The winter’s ne’er the colder,
They have no landlords’ rent to pay
Each man is a free-holder."

You that are free to cross the seas
Make no more disputation:
In Lubber-land you’ll live at ease,
With pleasant recreation:
The Captain waits but for a gale
Of prosperous wind and weather,
And then they soon will hoist up sail,
Make haste saway together.
Printed for J. Deacon, at the Angel in Gilt-spur-street [1685-1701]
Play: B102, Daniel Cooper

AKA and 1685 Broadside Ballad with ABOVE Title in it

This song is supposedly taken from the tune of "An Invitation to Lubberland"
WIKIPEDIA: "An Invitation to Lubberland" was a broadside ballad first printed in 1685. Many believe that it inspired the hobo ballad which formed the basis of the song Big Rock Candy Mountain recorded in 1928 by Harry McClintock.

An excerpt from the poem below with the title in it?

The king of Knaves, and Queen of Sluts
Reign there in peace and quiet;
You need not fear to starve your guts,
There is such store of dyet:
There may you live free from all care,
Like hogs set up a fat’ning;
The garments which the people wear
Is silver, silk and satin.

THE WHOLE IN CONTEXT from:
http://www.csufresno.edu/folklore/Olson/SONGTXT1.HTM

An Invitation to Lubberland

with

An Account of the great Plenty of that Fruitful Country

There is all sorts of Fowl and Fish,
With Wine and store of Brandy;
Ye have there what your hearts can wish:
The Hills are Sugar-Candy

To the tune of: Billy and Molly [lost] or, The Journey-man
Shoemaker [Daniel Cooper].

This may be Printed: R[ichard]. P[ocock]. [1685-1688]

There is a ship, we understand,
Now riding in the river;
‘Tis newly come from Lubberland, [Rumbelo?]
The like I think was never;
You that a lazy life do love.
I’d have you now go over,
They say the land is not above
Two thousand leagues from Dover.

The captain and the master too,
Do’s give us this relation,
And so do’s all the whole ship’s crew,
Concerning this strange nation:
"The streets are pav’d with pudding-pies,
nay, powder’d-beef and bacon,
They say they scorn to tell you lies:’
Who thinks it is mistaken.

The king of Knaves, and Queen of Sluts
Reign there in peace and quiet;
You need not fear to starve your guts,
There is such store of dyet:
There may you live free from all care,
Like hogs set up a fat’ning;
The garments which the people wear
Is silver, silk and satin.

The lofty buildings of this place
For many years have lasted;
With nutmegs, pepper, cloves, and mace,
The walls are there rough-casted,
In curious hasty-pudding boil’d,
And most ingenious carving;
Likewise they are with pancakes ty’d,
Sure, here’s no fear of starving.

The captain says, "In every town,
Hot roasted pigs will meet ye,
They in the streets run up and down,
Still crying out, Come eat me",
Likewise, he says, "At every feast,
The very fowls and fishes,
Nay from the biggest to the least,
Comes tumbling to the dishes.

"The rivers run with claret fine,
The brooks with rich canary,
The ponds with other sorts of wine,
To make your hearts full merry:
Nay, more than this, you may behold,
The fountains flow with brandy,
The rocks are like refined gold,
The hills are sugar candy.

"Rose-water is the rain they have,
Which comes in pleasant showers,
All places are adorned brave,
With sweet and fragrant flowers.
Hot custards grows on ev’ry tree,
Each ditch affords rich jellies;
Now if you will be ruled by me,
Go ther and fill your bellies.

"There’s nothing there but holy-days
With music out of measure;
Who can forbear to speak the praise
Of such a land of pleasure?
There may you lead a lazy life
Free from all kind of labours:
And he that is without a wife,
May borrow of his neighbour.

"There is no law nor lawyer’s fees
All men are free from fury,
For ev’ry one do’s what he please,
Without a judge or jury:
The summer-time is warm they say,
The winter’s ne’er the colder,
They have no landlords’ rent to pay
Each man is a free-holder."

You that are free to cross the seas
Make no more disputation:
In Lubber-land you’ll live at ease,
With pleasant recreation:
The Captain waits but for a gale
Of prosperous wind and weather,
And then they soon will hoist up sail,
Make haste saway together.
Printed for J. Deacon, at the Angel in Gilt-spur-street [1685-1701]
Play: B102, Daniel Cooper

Song Title Phrase used in an old dictionary defining “MUMPERS”

FROM: The Century dictionary and cyclopedia By William Dwight Whitney used in sentence to define "Mumpers."
"Since the King of Beggars was married to the Queen of S****, at Lowry Hill, near Beggar-Bush, being most splendidly attended by a ragged regiment of mumpers.
(Poor Robin, 1694) (Nares—illegible)" page 3,898