Oho! Oho! I’ve Found You Out jig

Also known as Asey’s March, Asey’s Piece, Ellis’, Ellis’s, Hunnell’s Double Drag, Mason’s Quickstep, O I Hae Seen The Roses Blaw, Port Ellis, Port Ui Ellis.

There are 2 recordings of a tune by this name.

Oho! Oho! I've Found You Out has been added to 18 tunebooks.

Download ABC

Two settings

X: 1
T: Oho! Oho! I've Found You Out
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Amix
|: E2A c2e | dBA G2F | E2A c2A | B2c dcd |
e2f gfe | dBA G2f | efe dcB| A3 A3 :|
|: a2e cBA | dBA G2e | a2e cBA | B2c dcd |
e2f gfe | dBA G2f | efe dcB| A3 A3 :|
X: 2
T: Oho! Oho! I've Found You Out
R: jig
M: 6/8
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G2 G ABA | c2 A F2 D | G>AG B2 c | d2 g d2 c |
B2 c d2 e | =f2 d B2 G | d>ed cBA | G3 G2 ||
g2 d B2 G | c2 A F2 D | g2 d B2c | e2 g d2 c |
B2 c d2 e | =f2 d B2 G | d>ed cBA | G3 G2 ||

Thirteen comments

A jig that blew me away

This is a jig that blew me away one day while I was playing through tunes in the Samuel P Bayard collection entitled Dance to the Fiddle March to the Fife.

From Ceolas Fiddlers Companion…

Bayard (1981) states this was one of the best-known tunes to southwestern Pa. and northern W.Va. fifers. He traces the tune to the Northumbria, England, small-pipes tradition to a tune named "O I Hae Seen the Roses Blaw" (Stokoe, pg. 84). Source for notated version: Hoge MS, a fife manuscript from southwestern Pa. [Bayard]. Bayard (Dance to the Fiddle), 1981; No. 610C, pgs. 540-541.

Also played on fiddle

Not just played on fife, but fiddle too. Also, to put this in context, the versions collected by Bayard were from musicians born mostly before the 1900’s… Although some of the fife bands had their tablature, most played by ear.

This tune is in one of O’Neill’s collections, but with mostly F3s in the Key of G… the version I posted here seems to be closer to the Scottish/North England versions with the natural G (or F in G)… A little more mysterious sounding to me.

F3’s??? ~ What’s an F3? ~ Is this some kind of ‘text-speak’? Are your pipe reeds turning green?

Ah, I see, you lost your little and third fingers on both hands in a chainsaw accident and can’t finger the ‘Shift’ keys. So sorry MH. How do you manage with only a thumb and two fingers on either hand anyway? Or maybe it’s just one key stroke at a time you can manage, I can sympathize with that… ;-)

“Oho, Oho, I’ve Found You Out” ~ K: a minor

Try this as ‘a minor’, with both the f and the c being natural ~ which would make it more in keeping with the date of contribution, more spooky, and fun…

Spooky!

That is spooky. I love this jig and sort of make it more of a double jig on the mandolin… I was hesitant to share it with the world but what the heck.

I’m glad you did, it’s a kick…we need all the single jigs we can get. ;-) The melody has a bit of the ‘country dance’ about it… Was there a dance associated with it?

“Oho, Oho, I’ve Found You Out” ~ also known as ~

a 6/8 march, American,
and a quickstep ~ "Mason’s Quickstep"

Courtesy of that great resource ~
Andrew Kuntz’s "The Fiddler’s Companion"
http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/index.html

“O I Hae Seen the Roses Blaw” ~ “Northumbrian Minstrelsy”, 1882

Bruce & Stokoe

Courtesy of the same source, "The Fiddler’s Companion", here is an earlier version of this tune as a true single jig, without the repetitions, and with the F naturals marked ‘=’:

K: G Major
D |
G2 G ABA | c2 A F2 D | G>AG B2 c | d2 g d2 c |
B2 c d2 e | =f2 d B2 G | d>ed cBA | G3 G2 ||
d |
g2 d B2 G | c2 A F2 D | g2 d B2c | e2 g d2 c |
B2 c d2 e | =f2 d B2 G | d>ed cBA | G3 G2 ||

“Ellis’s Jig” ~ the familiar

Now I know why this rang bells, "Ellis’s Jig", which was amongst the many tunes caught up in the O’Neill collections, and one I’d learned ages ago…as a ‘wee’ lad… It isn’t exactly the same. Let’s see what my memory and notes make of it…