The Peacock’s Feathers hornpipe

Also known as Cleite Na Péacóige, Peacock Feather, Peacock’s Feather, The Peacock’s Feather.

There are 22 recordings of a tune by this name.

The Peacock’s Feathers has been added to 9 tune sets.

The Peacock's Feathers has been added to 340 tunebooks.

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Six settings

X: 1
T: The Peacock's Feathers
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmin
|:AG|(3FED EC DA,DE|FEFA G2FG|A2d2 dcAG|FDA,=B,C2 AG|
(3FED EC DA,DE|FEFA G2FG|A2d2 dcAG|F2 D2 D2:|
|:A=B|c4 d4|dcA^F G2 A=B|c2 Ad dcAG|FDA,=B,C2 AG|
(3FED EC DA,DE|FEFA G2FG|A2d2 dcAG|F2 D2 D2:|
X: 2
T: The Peacock's Feathers
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Ddor
(3FED E>F (3DDD D>E | F>EF>A (3GAG F>G | A>dd>^c d>=cA>G | F>DA>B c2 A>G |
F2 E2 D2 D>E | F2 (3FGA G2 F>G | A2 (3ddd d2 A>G | F>D (3DDD D2 :|
c2 c>A d2 (ed^cd | d>cA>^F G2 A>B | c2 A>d d>cA>G | F2 A>B c2 A>G |
F2 E>F D>A (3DDE | F>EF>A G2 F>G | A>d^c>e d>cA>G | F2 D2 D2 :|
X: 3
T: The Peacock's Feathers
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:cABG AAAB|cABc d2cd|eaaa aged|cEEF G2ed|
cABG AAAB|cABc d2cd|eaab aged|[1cAAG A2ed:|[2cAAG A3G|
ggge aaag|agec d2cd|eaag aged|ccEF G2ed|
cABG AAAB|cABc d2cd|eaag aged|[1ccAG A3G|[2ccAG A2ed|
X: 4
T: The Peacock's Feathers
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Edor
(3FED E>F (3DDD D>E | F>EF>A (3GAG F>G | A>dd>^c d>=cA>G | F>DA>B c2 A>G |
F2 E2 D2 D>E | F2 (3FGA G2 F>G | A2 (3ddd d2 A>G | F>D (3DDD D2 :|
c2 c>A d2 (3ed^c | d>cA>^F G2 A>B | c2 A>d d>cA>G | F2 A>B c2 A>G |
F2 E>F D>A (3DDE | F>EF>A G2 F>G | A>d^c>e d>=cA>G | F2 D2 D2 :|
G>EF>D E2 E>F | G>FG>B A2 G>A | B>ee>^d e>=dB>A | G>E[B,F>[CE] D2 B>A |
(3GAG (3FGF E2 (3DEF | G>DG>B (3ABA G>A | B>ee>^d e>=dB<A | G2 E2 E2 :|
d>c (3dcB e2 f>d | e>dB>^G A2 (3ABc | d>G (3Bcd e>dB>A | G2 [B,F>[CE] D>BA>F |
G2 F>G E>^DE>F | G>FG>B A>DG>A | B>e^d>f e>=dB<A | G2 E>^D E2 :|
X: 5
T: The Peacock's Feathers
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Bmin
BA|:GEFD E2EF|GFGB A2GA|B2e2 edBA|GEB,C D2BA|
GEFD E2EF|GFGB A2GA|Beed edBA|[1 G2E2 E2BA:|[2 G2E2 E2Bc||
:d2dB e2ed|edB^G A2Bc|d2Be edBA|GEB,C D2BA|
GEFD E2EF|GFGB A2GA|Beed edBA|[1 G2E2 E2Bc:|[ 2G2E2 E4||
X: 6
T: The Peacock's Feathers
R: hornpipe
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
ed|:cABG A2AB|cBce d2cd|eaag aged|c2EF G2ed|
(3cBA (3BAG A2AB|cB (3cde d2cd|eaab aged|[1c2A2 A2 ed:|[2cAAG A2ef|]
g3e a3g|agec d2cd|eaag aged|c2 EF G2ed|
cABG A2AB|cABc d2cd|eaag aged|[1c2AG A2 ef|[2cAAG A2:||

Thirty-six comments

The Peacock’s Feathers

I transcribed this tune from a CD called - of all things - "Lifescapes: Celtic Fiddle" (despite the terrifying title, it’s got some fine trad fiddle playing on it). I’m not usually one for hornpipes, but I love the swing of this one, and the fact that it’s in a minor key doesn’t hurt either. I also like the fact that there is a lot of room for ornamentation - like not playing those triplets as triplets every time around, or making the long note in the second half a bit more interesting by adding rolls or somesuch.

Does anyone out there actually play this tune (in sessions, for instance)? What other tune(s) would you play it with?

i learned this one along with peacock’s feather #2, which follows it nicely. i’ve posted #2 ….

sarah cardin

I heard this one in a session last weekend. I knew it from somewhere, but couldn’t put a name to it. It’s basically the air of the song, The Parting Glass.

After learning this tune off an Iron Horse cd i try to squeeze it in to sessions sometimes. I find it sounds good played in Eminor too. Its a really really really cool tune so spread the word!

Fairly Common

This tune, along with the major version also posted here, is not that uncommon. I’ve heard them in lots of sessions. Both can be heard on Frankie Gavin’s classic album w/Alec Finn c. 1977. I don’t see the connection with the Parting Glass though. :-)

Even in this key and growl - still a BARNDANCE

How nice it would be to gather the brandances under that section, to see their similarities. While they do share a lot with hornpipes, there’s even one categorized under hornpipes in the O’Neil collections, ‘The Slipper’, they do have a certain pitch and yaw all thier own, as do Highlands (Highland Flings)…

=

Schottische / German / Barndance

Also played in A Dorian

Played in A Dorian on Open Hearth by Mary and Andrew MacNamara.

Peacock’s Feather

Hi all. In the tunes section there is a Peacock’s Feather in D major and one in D minor. The one in D minor has a key signature of one flat. My question is how do you play that on a D whistle? As you can tell, I am not much of a musician and am completely confused by this. I have a partner that I play with who wants to string the two together, but I am at a loss as to how to do so on my whistle. Thanks for the help.
Lowhistle

Well

on a D whistle it would be rather inconvenient. you’d be half-holing 2 notes, the F natural and the B flat.
if you had a C whistle it’d be easy. it’d be just like playing in E minor on your D whistle (with a cross-fingered C natural.)

I learned this tune along with the Peacock’s Feather in Dmajor at Swannanoa from Patrick MAngan…I really like them both, especially together…the first triplets are really fun to vary, I sometimes (I picked this up from Patrick too) play two triplets, so the tune starts A-G fed efe d (fed and efe as triplets, I’m new to this ABC notation thing)

March (no growl)

If this tune is in O’Farrell’s 1810 as a march, which it seems to be (although I don’t know if O’Farrell actually called it a march because I don’t have the book — I’m just going by the Fiddler’s Companion), I don’t see how anybody can growl about it being a barndance instead of a hornpipe!

Growl & Grumble ~ mmm, mmm, a good thing!!!

Marches and Barndances were interchangeable for some couple dances, that a tune can be played as both a march or a barndance/hornpipe/schottische/German ~ is no mean feat, easily done, hell, look at all the 2/4 marches being used as polkas, and the shared tunes and ways between strathspeys and highland flings (‘single’ schottishes)…

You misunderstood the use of ‘growl’ here Katedu. The term has to do with it dipping low. This melody is also played in other and higher keys. I love the growl of the lower registers… ;-)

“The Peacock’s Feather” ~ no Bbs, it’s D Dorian!!! ~ a whistle/flute friendly version?

K: D Dorian
|: A>G |
(3FED E>F (3DDD D>E | F>EF>A (3GAG F>G | A>dd>^c d>=cA>G | F>DA>B c2 A>G |
F2 E2 D2 D>E | F2 (3FGA G2 F>G | A2 (3ddd d2 A>G | F>D (3DDD D2 :|
|: A>B |
c2 c>A d2 (ed^cd | d>cA>^F G2 A>B | c2 A>d d>cA>G | F2 A>B c2 A>G |
F2 E>F D>A (3DDE | F>EF>A G2 F>G | A>d^c>e d>cA>G | F2 D2 D2 :|

The F natural is one of the easier half-holes to master, you just straighten out the third finger (E finger) so that it lifts enough to make the F natural, but not taking it off the instrument, and DO NOT USE THE FINGER TIP!!! It is a kind of rocking motion between moving between the E and the F natural on a D instrument. The first joint only of the finger rocks up slightly as you straighten it, while the back of that joint, The part palm-side, remains on the instrument. A basic exercise is just that, rocking that joint between the E and the F natural. It is basically the same move, part way, as slurring from E to F sharp, only the finger doesn’t lift off…

The above version replaces those lovely growls down to A, and B, and C, places most D winds can’t reach… I hope it helps. There are also some other ‘variations’ / choices given that differ from the transcription here…

And no smart ass comments about ‘cock-ups’…

You mean like one about the bar of 4/4 you wrote with 5 crotchets in? ;-)

Uh oh!? I did correct that didn’t I? If not, you’d better drop me an email quietly and direct me to where it is if it still is there…

Hey, maybe it was a hint of a 5/4 waltz… ;-)

I’m not going to tell you where it is. That’d make it too easy for you. I’ll give you a clue though. It’s on this page. I’m starting the stopwatch………..NOW.

Correction ~ | c2 c>A d2 (3d^cd |

Yup, I hit the key below 3 and 3nd3d up with an e ~ resulting in this ~ c2 c>A d2 (ed^cd | ~ … mea culpa!

4 minutes 33 seconds. What a coincidence!

When All Is Said And Done

Is this the same version that is on the Danú album? If so what whistle would be best to use for this? An F whistle seems like it would be too low. But then again I’m new to the whistle

“c”

Try it using a "C" whistle.

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Off When All is Said and Done

Danú plays what they call the Peacock’s Feather as a reel like this:

T: Peacock’s Feather as played by Danu
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: reel
K:Gmaj
|:cABG AAAB|cABc d2cd|eaaa aged|cEEF G2ed|
cABG AAAB|cABc d2cd|eaab aged|[1cAAG A2ed:|[2cAAG A3G|
ggge aaag|agec d2cd|eaag aged|ccEF G2ed|
cABG AAAB|cABc d2cd|eaag aged|[1ccAG A3G|[2ccAG A2ed|

I don’t know anything about musical modes so I don’t know if this is Gmaj or A dor or whatever but i needed an F# and Cnat so i put Gmaj

Goes nicely before Jamesy Gannon’s barndance.

K: ADor

It resolves on A, with F# and C natural, in this case A Dorian…

“The Peacock’s Feather”

X: 2
T: Peacock’s Feathers, The
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: hornpipe, barndance
K: DDor
|: A>G |\
(3FED E>F (3DDD D>E | F>EF>A (3GAG F>G | A>dd>^c d>=cA>G | F>DA>B c2 A>G |
F2 E2 D2 D>E | F2 (3FGA G2 F>G | A2 (3ddd d2 A>G | F>D (3DDD D2 :|
|: A>B |\
c2 c>A d2 (3ed^c | d>cA>^F G2 A>B | c2 A>d d>cA>G | F2 A>B c2 A>G |
F2 E>F D>A (3DDE | F>EF>A G2 F>G | A>d^c>e d>=cA>G | F2 D2 D2 :|

X: 4
T: Peacock’s Feathers, The
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: hornpipe, barndance
K: EDor
|: B>A |\
G>EF>D E2 E>F | G>FG>B A2 G>A | B>ee>^d e>=dB>A | G>E[B,F>[CE] D2 B>A |
(3GAG (3FGF E2 (3DEF | G>DG>B (3ABA G>A | B>ee>^d e>=dB<A | G2 E2 E2 :|
|: (3ABc |\
d>c (3dcB e2 f>d | e>dB>^G A2 (3ABc | d>G (3Bcd e>dB>A | G2 [B,F>[CE] D>BA>F |
G2 F>G E>^DE>F | G>FG>B A>DG>A | B>e^d>f e>=dB<A | G2 E>^D E2 :|

The Peacock’s predicament

<< Despite his wheel and his unbearable cry, the peacock has no reality whatsoever. Rather than an animal, it is a pattern invented by Moghul miniaturists and plundered by Art Nouveau decorators. Even in the wild -I saw whole coveys of them on the Dekkan roads- he is not credible. His heavy, hedge-hopping flight is a disaster, making him look like he’s always on the brink of impaling himself. At top speed, he barely rises above chest level, as if he could not get away from the world wherein he strayed. We can sense that his true destiny is to crown giant meat pies from which spring out hurdy-gurdy-playing dwarfs in bell hats. I will die without ever comprehending how Linnaeus could admit it in his classification. >>
from Nicolas Bouvier’s The Scorpion-Fish, 1982
(translated from the French (Switzerland) by Thierry Michel).

Peacock’s Feather(terry)

Played with friends. Beautiful unusual minor key hornpipe.

Re: Peacock’s Feather

Usually played in Dmin, and been here for 14 years. First time I’ve heard it played in Bmin, but I quite like it - more flute or whistle friendly.

https://thesession.org/tunes/663

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Re: Peacock’s Feather

This is actually Em, not Bm…?