Sir George MacKenzie reel

Also known as Lady McKinzie Of Coul.

There are 2 recordings of a tune by this name.

Sir George MacKenzie has been added to 10 tunebooks.

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Three settings

X: 1
T: Sir George MacKenzie
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
c|d2AF DFAF|d2AF EecA|d2AF DFAF|GEAG FDD:|
G|F/E/D AD BDAD|F/E/D AF GEEG|F/E/D AD BDAD|A,C2E FDDG|
F/E/D AD BDAD|F/E/D AF GEEG|F/G/A AF GBAg|fdec dA F|]
X: 2
T: Sir George MacKenzie
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
F|E2CE A,ECE|A,ECE FBBF|E2CE A,ECE ceBdcAA:|
d|c/B/A eA fAeA|c/B/A eA GBBd|c/B/A eA fAeF|EFAB cAAd|
c/B/A eA fAeA|c/B/A eA GBBd|ceAc defF|EFAB cAA|]
X: 3
T: Sir George MacKenzie
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
A|d2AF DFAF|d2AF EecA|d2FA DFAF|GEAG FDD:|
G|F/E/D AD BGAF|BGAF GEEG|F/E/D AD BDAF|A,FGE FDDG|
F/E/D AD BDAD|FDAF GEEG|FDAF GBAg|fdec dDD|]

Six comments

Don’t know who wrote this tune but it is another from the playing of Howie MacDonald. Reels with four bar A parts seem to be very popular in Cape Breton, perhaps because there they tend to play a lot of old tunes from the early Scottish collections (much more than you would hear in Scotland anyway).
I play this on the mandolin but am having trouble getting it up to speed.

Certainly a very similar sort of tune to Pretty Peg - they could well have had a common ancestor.

A lot of these short reels sound pretty similar, though I note that the A part of Pretty Peg ends on the dominant whereas this tune ends on the tonic. The title "Pretty Peg" seems unlikely to have been the original title for Pretty Peg, if you catch my drift, so it may well be an older tune. Who Knows?

Actually, it has far more in common with The Perth Hunt, written in the 1780’s, for although in a different key has a lot of the same "licks" and the same implied harmony.
The Perth Hunt goes something like this:
K: A
F|E2CE A,ECE|A,ECE FBBF|E2CE A,ECE ceBdcAA:|
d|c/B/A eA fAeA|c/B/A eA GBBd|c/B/A eA fAeF|EFAB cAAd|
c/B/A eA fAeA|c/B/A eA GBBd|ceAc defF|EFAB cAA|]

Paul Cranford sheds light

According to Paul Cranford the tune, which he attributes to Mr McLeod of Raasay, was first published in William Morrison’s Collection (1812) under the title Lady McKinzie of Coul.
Winston Fitzgerald recorded it, adapting his setting from The Athole Collection (1884). Hence the popularity of the tune in Cape Breton.
Brenda Stubbert’s arrangement (from Brenda Stubbert - The Second Collection) goes as follows:
A|d2AF DFAF|d2AF EecA|d2FA DFAF|GEAG FDD:|
G|F/E/D AD BGAF|BGAF GEEG|F/E/D AD BDAF|A,FGE FDDG|
F/E/D AD BDAD|FDAF GEEG|FDAF GBAg|fdec dDD|]