Dublin Coddle mazurka

Also known as The Dublin Coddle Varsovienne.

Dublin Coddle has been added to 12 tunebooks.

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Three settings

X: 1
T: Dublin Coddle
R: mazurka
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
B>A |(3GAG D2 B>A | (3GAG D2 (3Bcd | (3efe d2 G2 | F4 A>G |
(3FGF D2 A>G | (3FGF D2 (3Bcd | (3efe d2 A2 | G4 B>A |
(3GAG D2 B>A | (3GAG D2 (3Bcd | (3efe dG (3efg | a2 e>^d e>f |
g>B g>G (3gfe | (3ded B>d (3Bcd | f>F d>F c>F | G4 ||
B>A |G>D G>A (3Bcd | g>f g>b a>f | g>B g>G g>e | f4 A>^G |
A>E A>B c>d | f2 f>g f>e | d>A d>D F>D | B2 B>d B>A |
G>D G>A (3Bcd | g>f g>b a>f | g>B g>G gf | e2 e>^d e>f |
g>f a>g (3gfe | (3ded B>d B>d | f>F d>F c>F | G4 |]
X: 2
T: Dublin Coddle
R: mazurka
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
c>B |(3ABA E2 c>B | (3ABA E2 (3cde | (3fgf e2 A2 | G4 B>A |
(3GAG E2 B>A | (3GAG E2 (3cde | (3fgf e2 B2 | A4 c>B |
(3ABA E2 c>B | (3ABA E2 (3cde | (3fgf e>A (3fga | b2 f>^e f>g |
a>c a>A (3agf | (3efe c>e (3cde | g>G e>G d>G | A4 ||
c>B |A>E A>B (3cde | a>g a>c’ b>a | a>c a>A a>f | g4 B>^A |
B>F B>c d>e | g2 g>a g>f | e>B e>E G>E | c2 c>e c>B |
A>E A>B (3cde | a>g a>c’ b>a | a>c a>A a>g | f2 f>^e f>g |
a>g b>a (3agf | (3efe c>e A>e | g>G e>G d>G | A4 |]
X: 3
T: Dublin Coddle
R: mazurka
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
cB A2 E2 | cB A2 E2 | cd f2 e2 | A2 G4 |
BA G2 E2 | BA G2 E2 | ce f2 e2 | B2 A4 |
cB A2 E2 | cB A2 E2 | cd f2 e2 | a2 b4 |
fg a2 a2 | af e2 c2 | ce g2 e2 | G2 A4 ||
cB A2 A2 | ce a2 a2 | bg a2 A2 | a2 g4 |
B^A B2 B2 | de g2 g2 | gf e2 E2 | G2 c4 |
cB A2 A2 | ce a2 a2 | bg a2 A2 | g2 f4 |
fg a2 a2 | af e2 e2 | ce g2 e2 | G2 A4 |]

Seventeen comments

“Dublin Coddle” ~ a favourite dish around this house

A couple of pounds of good pork sausages, high meat content
A pound of nice smoked dry cure bacon and/or a knuckle of ham
2 large onions
a few cloves of garlic
a couple of carrots sliced
several large potatoes sliced
seasoning and herbs to taste & fresh parsley (flat preferred)
Cider
flour for thickening

I have also made a seafood version with fresh mackerel, etc…

Flour the sausages and then brown them in some fat or oil
Saute the onions and whole garlic cloves in the oil
Place it all in a pan with a wad of choice herbs
Cover it all with cider
Cook for at least an hour but don’t let it come to a boil
Garnish with chopped fresh parsley

Great with a nice warm wheaten loaf and melting butter…
Mmmmmmm!!! :-)

I’m not sure if it is still being made, but some of the best cider I’ve ever had was from Eire, and I remember it had a nice blush to it and came in a wine sized bottle or something akin to that. It wasn’t a big production and was choice stuff…

This started life with the A-part in Ab, and then segwayed into Bb as the B-part came to life… Then I pushed it all together as A, and then out of consideration for the smirks amongst those of you who would have seen the c’, I’ve given it here in G…

Jimmy Troy ~

This came about thinking about an old friend, Jimmy Troy, who I used to enjoy playing mazurkas and varosviennes with, a lovely man and a fine musician and dancer… You are missed…

Dow niggling me about the form also helped bring this about, and a bit more dancing as I was cooking…

I almost named it for Jimmy, but I know he’d appreciate a good warm coddle too… ;-)

Eh Puddy Tat ~ A!!! & two times… ;-)

X: 1134
T: Dublin Coddle
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
R: mazurka
K: A Major
cB |
(3ABA E2 cB | (3ABA E2 (3cde | (3fgf e2 A2 | G4 BA |
(3GAG E2 BA | (3GAG E2 (3cde | (3fgf e2 B2 | A4 cB |
(3ABA E2 cB | (3ABA E2 (3cde | (3fgf eA (3fga | b2 f^e fg |
ac aA (3agf | (3efe ce (3cde | gG eG dG | A4 ||
cB |
AE AB (3cde | ag ac’ ba | ac aA af | g4 B^A |
BF Bc de | g2 ga gf | eB eE GE | c2 ce cB |
AE AB (3cde | ag ac’ ba | ac aA ag | f2 f^e fg |
ag ba (3agf | (3efe ce Ae | gG eG dG | A4 ||

No, I’m not submitting the takes in Ab and Bb, sorry… However, since we’re in A I’ll stay there as I knock the varsovienne out of it ~

X: 1134
T: Dublin Coddle
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
R: varsovienne
K: A Major
cB A2 E2 | cB A2 E2 | cd f2 e2 | A2 G4 |
BA G2 E2 | BA G2 E2 | ce f2 e2 | B2 A4 |
cB A2 E2 | cB A2 E2 | cd f2 e2 | a2 b4 |
fg a2 a2 | af e2 c2 | ce g2 e2 | G2 A4 ||
cB A2 A2 | ce a2 a2 | bg a2 A2 | a2 g4 |
B^A B2 B2 | de g2 g2 | gf e2 E2 | G2 c4 |
cB A2 A2 | ce a2 a2 | bg a2 A2 | g2 f4 |
fg a2 a2 | af e2 e2 | ce g2 e2 | G2 A4 ||

“Dublin Coddle”

I forgot the mention I cut up the sausages to add to the final dish…

Have’nt tried the dish yet but the tune goes nicely on my de-clubed D/G plus 1/2 row with accidentals. Good tune which, to me, has an ‘oldie timey music-hally’ feel about it. (can’t think of any other way to descride it, ‘know what I mean?’

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Dublin Coddle ~ the recipe and variations

Two variant ~ I sometimes slice in good ol’ baking apples too, and I have also made it repacing the potatoes with apples…

“Dublin Coddle” ~ just so you know it’s ‘real’

We always make the coddle, stew, the day before, so the flavours will meld. We made it last night and had it this evening and will get another meal out of it on Wednesday night. I have a bad habit of variations on a basic theme, which I’m glad to say mostly work. This time we used a pressed cloudy apple juice, no pre-fermentation involved. The starting juice was superb. We used to press our own and make our own cider, and apple wine, but not this time. The only new addition is at the last minute I threw in sliced mini sweet peppers, which went nicely with it all.

Ingredients are everything, and we lucked out in getting some great potatoes and small super sweet carrots, which were delicious. On meat we added chunks of dry cured smoky bacon and some Cumberland sausages. The latter proved the only disappointment, though they advertised themselves well. I don’t like the standard pork, which has a stink and taste I’m not happy with. I tend to only go with free range if I can get it, or just avoid purchasing pork all together. My favourite sausages for this dish are boar, or a cross breed we have here on these isles, which lead a good life and haven’t that smell and taste. Also, I like to use venison sausage. No baking apples this time. Despite the minor disappointment, we are now both well stuffed and still count coddle as a favourite meal. Oh yeah, another option to consider ~ using perry… :-)

Fresh herbs ~ all home grown ~ parsley, sage, chives & young bay leaf… Mmmmmm!

“Dublin Coddle” ~ real comfort food ~ mmmmm!!!

We always make enough for two meals, and tonight, four days later, we’re finishing it ~ mmmmm!!! You don’t know what you’re missing if you haven’t tried this wondeful dish. I tend to have a nice pint of cider or perry with the meal, and some homemade bread goes well with it too, but it is quite filling on its own. This is one of our favourites and one of those dishes that is never exactly the same twice, but always satisfying and welcome, but we are very fond of soups, stews, chowders and things like good home baking, like bread…

Er, back to the tune, and what a fine one it is to put a smile on one’s face while playing it with yer mates. Difficult to play on the flute or whistle while one is grinning so big. Thanks for posting this one, ceolachan.

If your cooking is as delightful as this tune (Dublin Coddle) then you must be a popular person. If not popular, then at least happy.

Sorry, didn’t mean to imply that being popular and happy were mutually exclusive conditions.

:-D At least ‘reasonably’ happy…