Rosalie, The Prairie Flower barndance

Also known as Rosalie The Prairie Flower.

There is 1 recording of this tune.

Rosalie, The Prairie Flower has been added to 9 tunebooks.

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Two settings

1
X: 1
T: Rosalie, The Prairie Flower
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:B>AG>F G2 E2|D>ED<B, D4|B>AG>F G2 B2|A2 E2 A4|
B>AG>F G2 E2|D>ED<B, D4|E>FG>A B2 A2|G2 D2 G4:|
|:A2 G>A B2 d2|A2 G>A B4|G2 F>G A2 c2|G2 F>G A4|
B>AG>F G2 E2|D>ED<B, D4|E>FG>A B2 A2|G4- G4:|
|:b/c'/b/a/ g>f g2 (3e>fe|d>ed<B d4|b/c'/b/a/ g>f g2 (3b>c'b|(3a>ba e2 (3ab<a- a2|
b/c'/b/a/ g/a/g/f/ g2 (3e>fe|d>ed<B d4|.e>.f.g>.a (3b>c'b (3a>ba|1 g2 dB G4:|2 g4- g4||
(3A>BA G>A B2 c>B|(3A>BA G>A B4|G2 F>G A2 c2|G2 F>G A4|
B/c/B/A/ g>f g2 (3e>fe|d>ed<B d4|.e>.f.g>.a (3B>cB (3A>BA|G4- G4|
(3A>BA G>A (3B>cB d2|(3A>BA G>A B4|G2 F>G A2 c2|(3G>AG F>G A4|
B/c/B/A/ G>F G2 (3e>fe|d>ed<B d4|.e>.f.G>.A (3B>cB (3A>BA|G4- G4||
2
X: 2
T: Rosalie, The Prairie Flower
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|:BAGF G2 E2|DEDB, D4|BAGF G2 B2|A2 E2 A4|
BAGF G2 E2|DEDB, D4|EFGA B2 A2|G2 D2 G4:|
|:A2 GA B2 d2|A2 GA B4|G2 FG A2 c2|G2 FG A4|
BAGF G2 E2|DEDB, D4|EFGA B2 A2|G4- G4:|
|:fedc d2 B2|ABAF A4|fedc d2 f2|e2 B2 e4|
fedc d2 B2|ABAF A4|Bcde f2 e2|d2 A2 d2:|
e2 de f2 a2|e2 de f4|d2 cd e2 f2|d2 cd e4|
fedc d2 B2|ABAF A4|Bcde f2 e2|d4- d4:|

Fourteen comments

"Rosalie, The Prairie Flower"

& here she is without the frilly gingham dress and ribbons in her hair ~

X: 1134
T: Rosalie, The Prairie Flower
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: schottische / barndance
K: G Major
|: BAGF G2 E2 | DEDB, D4 | BAGF G2 B2 | A2 E2 A4 |
BAGF G2 E2 | DEDB, D4 | EFGA B2 A2 | G2 D2 G4 :|
|: A2 GA B2 d2 | A2 GA B4 | G2 FG A2 c2 | G2 FG A4 |
BAGF G2 E2 | DEDB, D4 | EFGA B2 A2 | G4- G4 :|

X: 1134
T: Rosalie, The Prairie Flower
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: schottische / barndance
K: D Major
|: fedc d2 B2 | ABAF A4 | fedc d2 f2 | e2 B2 e4 |
fedc d2 B2 | ABAF A4 | Bcde f2 e2 | d2 A2 d2 :|
e2 de f2 a2 | e2 de f4 | d2 cd e2 f2 | d2 cd e4 |
fedc d2 B2 | ABAF A4 | Bcde f2 e2 | d4- d4 :|

"Rosalie, The Prairie Flower" x 2

This was transcribed from the playing of Billy Ballantine on piccolo and Jimmy Hunter on mouth organ. The first transcription given is a basic take, and the second is following the piccolo and includes some of his ways with it, including those swung triplets…

I did consider alternatives to represent Billy Ballantine’s triplets, for examples:

e>f/e/ & A>B/A/ instead of (3e>fe & (3A>BA

~ but I feel the latter does it the greater justice, as it is definitely a sloow-quick-slow…

Ronnie Cooper, Shetland composer, Appreciation Week ~ apologies!

I had a request, and when I have someone request something, in the second case this tune, I put other things on hold until I meet the ‘demand’. In this case the person making the request is impatient and could be potentially problematic, vengeful. So, worried for my life and my wife, I handcuffed myself to this desk, drool all over the keyboard this morning, and have been subjecting myself to this tune repeating in my headphones over and over and over ~ … I’m still worried. They are so persnickitty that this may still not meet their requirements. What would I do then? My life would be worth nothing if my ‘master’ is not pleased. Igor strives to please the ‘master’… 😎 Maybe a Doctor Who analogy would work better? πŸ˜‰

πŸ™‚

He’s pleased, I can unlock the ankle irons and finally go have something to eat and drink, and take a nap, hopefully with no more drooling…

Sorry Mark/Dow, I was getting around to adding that other information you’d sent… Now where did I store it? ~ More to follow ~

"Rosalie, The Prairie Flower" ~ lyrics by Lesley Nelson-Burns

http://www.contemplator.com/america/rosalie.html

Information:

The original music for Rosalie has the author as G. F. Wurzel, which was a pseudonym for George F. Root (1820-1895) (Wurzel is the German word for root.) It was popularized in the 1850s by the Christy Minstrels.

George Root was one of the most successful songwriters of his generation. He asked for a one-hundred dollar payment for the song and was refused. He settled for a royalty contract which brought him more than three thousand dollars - an incredible amount for a songwriter at that time.

Lyrics:

On the distant prairie, where the heather wild,
In its quiet beauty liv’d and smiled,
Stands a little cottage, and a creeping vine
Loves around its porch to twine.
In that peaceful dwelling was a lovely child,
With her blue eyes beaming soft and mild,
And the wavy ringlets of her flaxen hair,
Floating in the summer air.
* * * * * *
Fair as a lily, joyous and free
Light of that prairie home was she,
Ev’ryone who knew her felt the gentle pow’r
Of Rosalie, ‘The Prairie Flower.’

On that distant prairie, when the days were long,
Tripping like a fairy, sweet her song,
With the sunny blossoms, and the birds at play,
Beautiful and bright as they.
When the twilight shadows gather’d in the west,
And the voice of Nature sank to rest,
Like a cherub kneeling, seem’d the lovely child,
With her gentle eyes so mild.
* * * * * *
Fair as a lily, joyous and free,
Light of that prairie home was she.
Ev’ry one who knew her felt the gentle pow’r
Of Rosalie, ‘The Prairie Flow’r.’

But the summer faded, and a chilly blast,
O’er that happy cottage swept at last:
When the autumn song birds woke the dewy morn,
Little ‘Prairie Flow’r’ was gone.
For the angels whisper’d softly in her ear,
‘Child, thy Father calls thee, stay not here.’
And they gently bore her, rob’d in spotless white,
To their blissful home of light.
* * * * * *
Though we shall never look on her more,
Gone with the love and joy she bore,
Far away she’s blooming in a fadeless bow’r,
Sweet Rosalie, ‘The Prairie Flow’r’.

Brothers and Sisters ~ raise your glasses and your voices as we sing ~

All in attention holding attempts toward just-intonation harmony resulting in strident raucous atonal cacophony, what clangorous joy… 😎

All together now:

Fair as a lily, joyous and free
Light of that prairie home was she,
Ev’ryone who knew her felt the gentle pow’r
Of Rosalie, ‘The Prairie Flower.’

~ See what his influence has done to me?! πŸ™

The Music of George Frederick Root, aka G. Friedrich Wurzel, 1820 - 1895

Just a little taster from Mark’s link:

http://www.pdmusic.org/root-gf.html
Songs | Cantatas | Hymns | Instrumentals | Arrangements

"George Frederick Root, aka G. Friedrich Wurzel, was born in Sheffield, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on 30 August 1820, and died, at the age of 74, on Bailey’s Island, Maine on 6 August 1895. He published over 500 pieces of music from 1852 until 1896. He used his German surname Wurzel, the English equivalent of Root, for his minstrel songs. ~"

" ~ He is best known for the songs The Hazel Dell (1853), Rosalie the Prairie Flower (1855), Departed Days (1857), There’s Music in the Air (1857), Flee As a Bird (arr. 1857), The Vacant Chair, or, We Shall Meet But We Shall Miss Him (1861), The Battle Cry of Freedom (1862), Just Before the Battle, Mother (1864), Tramp! Tramp! Tramp!, or, The Prisoner’s Hope (1864), Farewell Father, Friend and Guardian (1865), Blaine for Our President (1884), and The Plumed Knight (1884). ~"

+ two midis for your listening pleasure:

song ~ http://www.pdmusic.org/root-gf/gfr55f.mid

instrumental arrangement, for military band ~
http://www.pdmusic.org/root-gf/gfr69rtpf-arr.mid

Those cutesy lyrics remind me of watching "Little House On The Prairie" when I was a kid. Remember the title sequence where you see those kids skipping along through the meadows, happy and free? πŸ™‚

ABCs corrected ~ not (3B>CB ~ but (B>cB

How did that low C get in there? Here’s what it should be where:

~
~ | .e>.f.g>.a (3B>cB (3A>BA | G4- G4 |
~
~ | .e>.f.G>.A (3B>cB (3A>BA | G4- G4 ||

I blame fiel and kenny for distracting me with melodies from the auld country like "Moldovanskaya Honga", because something isn’t quite right with it as I remember it in my bones, and that’s what has me distracted. I’m sure my brother Mosha and the uncles played it differently… 😏

& ~ | B/c/B/A/ g>f g2 (3e>fe | & | B/c/B/A/ G>F G2 (3e>fe | ~ 😏

~ the B-part again, bars 5 & 9

There was an older ABCs before the computer age, and one way had the C an octave higher, starting with the D below the staff and going up from there so ~ D E F G A B C ~ and sometimes it slips past me without me realizing the mistake, especially when I’m tired. More often nowadays I catch it, but not today, sorry… It is now corrected in the ABCs…

Thanks Ben Hall, I should have been checking my mail regularly too…