Jaybird reel

There is 1 recording of a tune by this name.

Jaybird has been added to 16 tunebooks.

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Three settings

X: 1
T: Jaybird
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|: G2B2 BABA | F2A2 A2F2 | E2e2 e2ef | gfed cBAF |
G2B2 BABA | F2A2 A2AB | d2de dBAG | F2D2 D4 :|
|: f2A2 f2A2 | fefg a2gf | e2A2 e2A2 | edef g2ag |
f2A2 f2A2 | fefg a2AB | d2de dBAG | F2D2 D4 :|
X: 2
T: Jaybird
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|:D|GBBG FAAF|Ee ed =c2 BA|GBBG FAAc|dAAG F2 D:|
|:g|fdfd fa ag/f/|ecec eg gf/e/|fdfd faac|dAAG F2 D:|
X: 3
T: Jaybird
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|:ag|f2d2 f2d2 | fefg a2gf | e2c2 e2c2 |ecef g2ag |
f2d2 f2d2 | fefg a2Bc | d2A2 ABAG | F2D2D2:|
|: EF |G2 B2 B2 AG |FEFG A2cd | e2e2 efed | c2A2A2 EF|
G2 B2 B2 AG |FEFG A2 Bc | d2A2 ABAG | F2D2D2 :|

Thirteen comments

Fun

I always liked this fun tune that I first heard of from My Grandmother. I was reminded of this tune because of this submission…

https://thesession.org/tunes/7434

Both very English/Scottish sounding to me.

Yes the c is natural and its the only c in it so why bother with the 2 sharps. And yes I know that alot of Irish players wouldnt consider it a reel, but its one of those tunesthat IS a reel like other traditions…. Shetland-Northumberland-English… it makes sense to me, but call it a hornpipe if you must.

‘natural’, what else, no artificial ‘e’s here.

Jaybird, jaybird, why do you fly so high,
You’ve been eatin’ those acorns all your life
It’s a wonder you don’t die.

Don’t die, don’t die, it’s a wonder you don’t die,
You’ve been eatin’ those acorns all your life
It’s a wonder you don’t die.

😉

G Mixolydian?! 😏

Key

It starts off in G major and finishes in D major. In between (bars 4 and 8) there are "open" endings on the dominant. Not modal.

Oh yeah? 😏 ~ It hasn’t quite go that modal kick, so I ken that, but your description doesn’t seem to ring true either, especially as both parts ‘resolve’ on the ‘D’…

Also, there’s just no way the A-part resolves on G…

Curious?! 😏

Of course I am. My wife and I have just played it on mandolin and guitar trying to figure out what it is. What we both find awkward is the shift from bar 6 to bar 7 (A- and B-part), both from the melodic and harmonic point of view. What she played on the guitar is this:
G |D |e |e D |G |D |D G A|D :|| for the A-part. It has a classical cadenza in bar 7, helping to establish D-major. The conclusion is that this part starts off in G and finishes in D, while the second one is clearly in Dmajor, although there is no seventh. Does this make more sense?

I checked the Ceolas Collection…

And this version is there with a C natural….

X:1
T:Bonny Breast Knot
L:1/8
M:C|
K:D
|:D|GBBG FAAF|Ee ed =c2 BA|GBBG FAAc|dAAG F2 D:|
|:g|fdfd fa ag/f/|ecec eg gf/e/|fdfd faac|dAAG F2 D:|

BONNY BREAST KNOT(S), THE. AKA and see "The Breast Knot," "Bonny Breist Knots," "Daddy Shot a Bear" (Pa.), "Jaybird" (Pa.), "Lady’s Breast Knot," "Looking Glass," "The Pennsylvania Fifers" (Pa.). English, Reel or Country Dance Tune (2/2 time). England, Northumberland. D Major. Standard. AAB (Barnes): AABB (Kennedy, Raven). The country dance "Bonny Breast Knots" has been known since about 1770, according to Flett & Flett (1964), and long had a special place at Scottish weddings. Up until about 1900 in Roxburghshire and West Berwickshire, Scotland, it was always performed as the first dance after the wedding supper, with the bride and groom leading off with the best man and bridesmaid. Its status in the wedding rituals may be what is referred to in the song "The Briest Knots," quoted by Flett & Flett:
***
‘Syne off they got a’ wi’ a fling,
Each lass unto her lad did cling,
And a’ cry’d for a different spring,
The bride she sought the breast-knot.

Bar 6 to 7

Sometimes I go from a triplett of Abc to lead into bar 7… theres more than one way to kill a Jaybird

Old timey dance tune

I’ve backed this up in the key of D (c sharps) with the parts switched as an old timey tune for dances here up north. It’s also on one of the earlier Fennig’s All-Stars albums in that configuration.

Jaybird, X:3

Played as a reel/breakdown in the US. Sounds as if it started out as a hornpipe.