Miss McLeod’s reel

Also known as Did You Ever Meet The Devil, Uncle Joe?, Have You Ever Seen The Devil, Uncle Joe?, Hop High Ladies, Iníon Mhic Leóid, McCleod’s, McCloud’s, McLeod’s, Miss MacLeod, Miss McCleod, Miss McCleod’s, Miss McCloud, Miss McCloud’s, Miss McLeod, Miss McLeod’s, Mrs MacLeod Of Raasay, Mrs Mc Leod’s, Mrs Mcleod Of Raasay, Mrs McLeod’s, Mrs McLeods, Mrs. MacLeod’s, Mrs. Mc Cloud, Mrs. McCloud, Mrs. McCloud’s, Mrs. McClouds, Mrs. McLeod, Mrs. McLeod Of Rasay, Mrs. McLeod’s, Mrs. McLeods, Ms McCloud’s, Ms. McLeod’s, Uncle Joe’s.

There are 222 recordings of this tune.

This tune has been recorded together with

Miss McLeod’s appears in 5 other tune collections.

Miss McLeod’s has been added to 209 tune sets.

Miss McLeod's has been added to 1,713 tunebooks.

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Twenty-three settings

1
X: 1
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:G2 BG AGBG|B2 BA BcBA|G2 BG AGBG|A2 AG AcBA|
G2 BG AGBG|B2 BA B2 d2|e2 ef edef|gfed BcBA:|
|:G2 gf edeg|B2 BA BcBA|G2 gf edeg|a2 ag aeef|
g2 gf edeg|BcBA B2 d2|edef edef|gfed BcBA:|
2
X: 2
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
|:A3c e2 ce|fecf ecBc|A3c e2cB|AFAF EAcB|
A3c e2 ce|fecB ABce|fedc defa|afec BAcB:|
3
X: 3
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G2BG dGBG|GBBA BcBA|G2BG dGBG|FGAB cBAF|
G2BG dGBG|GBBA Bcdf|efed ^cdef|~g3e dBAF:|
G2gf edgd|B2BA BcbA|g2fg efge|A2AG AcBA|
G2gf edgd|B2BA Bcdf|efed ^cdef|~g3e dBAF|
G2gf edgd|B2BA Bcba|g2fg efgb|a2ag agef|
g2fg edgd|B2BA Bcdf|efed ^cdef|gedg ecAF||
4
X: 4
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:GABc d2BG|ABBA B2BA|GABc d2BG|AD~D2 ABBA|
GABc d2BG|ABBA B2Bd|e2ed ^cdef|gedB AdBA:|
|:G2g2 edeg|ABBA B2BA|G2g2 edeg|~a3b ageg|
dggf edeg|ABBA B2Bd|e2ed ^cdef|gedB AdBA:|
5
X: 5
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G2BG DGBG|B2BA BcBA|G2BG DGBG|A2AG AcBA|
G2BG DGBG|B2BA B2d2|efed Bdef|gedB AcBA:|
G2gf efge|B2BA BcBA|G2gf efge|a2ab agef|
~g3f efge|B2BA B2d2|efed Bdef|gedB AcBA:|
6
X: 6
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G,B,DG c2 BG|DGBA BcBA|G,B,DG B2 AG|AFDF AdBA|
GABG dGEG|cGDG BGdG|c2 Bd cded|BddB AdBA:|
GBdb ageg|dBBA B2 AB|GBdb aged|eaga gedB|
GBdb ageg|dBBA B2 GB|edcB cded|BddB AdBA:|
# Added by Kenny .
7
X: 7
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
|:G2 g2 edeg|B2 BA BcBA|G2 g2 edeg|A2 AG A cBA|
G2 gf edeg|BcBA B2 d2|edef edef|gfed BcBA:|
|:GA Bc dBGA|B2 BA BcBA|GA Bc dBGB|A2 AG AcBA|
GA Bc dBGA|B2 BA B2 d2|e2 ef edef|gfed BcBA:|
|:A2 a2 fefa|c2 cB cdcB|A2 a2 fefa|B2 BA B dcB|
A2 ag fefa|cdcB c2 e2|fefg fefg|agfe cdcB:|
|:AB cd ecAB|c2 cB cdcB|AB cd ecAc|B2 BA BdcB|
AB cd ecAB|c2 cB c2 e2|f2 fg fefg|agfe cdcB:|
8
X: 8
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
GGBG DGBG|BBBA BdBA|GGBd gfed|egdB AdBA|
GGBG DGBG|BBBA GABd|eccB cdea|gedB AGED||
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA BdBA|GGBG DGBd|FEDC B,DA,D|
G,G,BG DGBG|BBBA GABd|eccB cdea|gedB AdBA||
ggag edeg|BBBA GABd|ggag edeg|aabg aged|
ggag edeg|BBBA GABd|eccB cdea|gedB AdBA||
ggag edeg|bbBA GABd|ggag edeg|ac'bg aged|
gbag edeg|BBBA GABd|(3efg fa gbae|gedB AGED||
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA BdBA|GGBd gfed|(3efg dB AGED|
GGBG DGBG|[BB,2]BBA GABd|eccB cdea|gedB (3ABc BA||
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA BdBA|GGBG DGBd|FEDC B,DA,D|
G,G,BG B,GBG|BBAB GABd|eccB cdea|gedB AcBA||
G2 Gg edeg|[Bb][Bb]BA GABd|G2 Gg edeg|a2 bg aged|
ggag edeg|BBBA GABd|ec (3ccc egga|gedB AdBA||
ggag edeg|bbBA GABd|ggag edeg|ac'bg aged|
gbag edeg|BBBA GABd|(3efg fa gbae|gedB (3ABc BA||
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA BdBA|GGBd gfed|(3efg dB AGED|
GGBG DGBG|[BB,]BBA GABd|ec (3ccc egga|gedB (3ABc BA||
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA BdBA|GGBG DGBd|FEDC B,DA,D|
G,G,BG B,GBG|(3BdB AB GABd|eccB cdea|gedB (3ABc BA||
ggag edeg|[bB]bBA GABd|ggag edeg|aabg aged|
ggag edeg|[bB]bBA GABd|ec (3ccB cdea|gedB AcBA||
G2 Gg edeg|[bB]bBA GABd|GGGg edeg|ac'bg aged|
ggfg edeg|BBBA GABd|egfa gbae|gedB (3ABc BA||
[G2G,2] GG DGBG|[B,2B2] BA BdBA|GGBd gfed|(3efg dB (3ABc BA|
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA GABd|eccB cdea|gedB (3ABc BA||
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA BdBA|GGBG DGBd|FEDC B,DA,D|
G,2 BG DGBG|BBAB GABd|eccB cdea|gedB AcBA||
[g2G2] Gg edeg|bbbA GABd|ggag edeg|ac'bg aged|
ggag edeg|bbBA GABd|eccB cdea|gedB (3ABc BA||
ggag edeg|bbBA GABd|ggag edeg|ac'bg aged|
gbag edeg|bBBA GABd|(3efg fa g2 (3bag|gedB (3ABc BA|G4 z4||
9
X: 9
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G2gf efge|dBBA BcdB|g3g efge|agfe dc'ba|
(3gag fg efge|dBBA Bcdf|egfa gbaf|gdBd cAFA:|
(3DEG BG DGBA|B3c BAGE|(3DEG BG cGBG|AFDF AcBA|
(3DEG BG DGBA|B3c Bcdf|egfa gbaf|gdBd cAFA:|
10
X: 10
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
B|:dGBG ~B3 A|BcBA G2 AG|dGBG GAAG|ABcA G2 AG|
dGBG ~B3 A|~B3 d efed|Bdef gedB|AcBA G2 AG:|
|:G2 gf efge|~B3 A BcBA|G2 gf efge|~a3 b agef|
~g3f efge|~B3 A ~B3 d|efed (3Bcd ef|gedB AcBA:|
|:G2 BG dGBG|~B3 A BcBA|G2 BG dGBG|~A3 G ABcA|
G2 BG dGBG|~B3 A ~B3 d|efed Bdef|gedB AcBA:|
11
X: 11
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|G2 g2 edeg|B2 BA B2 BA|G2 g2 edeg|A2 AG A2BA|
G2 g2 edeg|B2 BA B2 Bd|e2 e2 edef|gedB A2 BA:|
G2BG dGBG|B2 BA B2 BA|G2 BG dGBG|A2 AG A2BA|
G2BG dGBG|B2 BA B2 Bd|e2 e2 edef|gedB A2 BA:|
12
X: 12
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
M:2/4
|:Dd (B/A/B/d/)|FF (F/G/F/E/)|Dd (B/A/B/d/)|EE E/G/F/E/|
Dd B/A/B/d/|FF/G/ F/G/A|BB/c/ B/A/B/c/|d/B/A/F/ E2:|
|:DF/D/ A/D/F/D/|FF/E/ F/G/F/E/|DF/D/ A/D/F/D/|EE/D/ E/G/F/E/|
DF/D/ A/D/F/D/|FF FG/A/|B(B/c/) B/A/B/c/|d/B/A/F/ E2:|
13
X: 13
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|:D2 d2 (BABd)|F2 F2 (FGFE)|D2 d2 (BABd)|E2 E2 EGFE|
D2 d2 BABd|F2 FG FG A2|B2 Bc BABc|dBAF E4:|
|:D2 FD ADFD|F2 FE FGFE|D2 FD ADFD|E2 ED EGFE|
D2 FD ADFD|F2 F2 F2 GA|B2 (Bc) BABc|dBAF E4:|
14
X: 14
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:G2 BG DGBG|~B3A BcBA|G2 BG DGBG|A2AF AcBA|
G2 BG DGBG|~B3A Bcd2|edcB cdef|~g3d ecAF:|
|:G2 gf efgd|~B3 A BcBA|G2 gf efge|a2 ab agef|
~g3f efge|~B3A Bc d2|edcB cdef|~g3d ecAF:|
# Added by ebarr .
15
X: 15
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:G2BG dGBG|B2 BA BcBA|G2BG dGBG|A2 AG AcBA|
G2BG dGBG|B2 BA B2 d2|e3f edef|gedB A2 BA:|
|:G2 g2 edeg|B2BA BcBA|G2 g2 edeg|a3b aged|
G2gf edeg|B2 BA B2 d2|e3f edef|gedB A2 BA|
|:GBDG BDGB|DBBA BcBA|GBDG BDGB|ADFA DFAD|
GBDG BDGB|DBBA B3d|e3f edef|gedB A2 BA:|
|:g2 fg efge|dBBA (3Bcd ef|g2 fg ef g2|a3b c'bag|
g2 fg efge|dBBA B3d|e3f edef|gedB A2 BA:|
# Added by JACKB .
16
X: 16
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G2gf efge|dBBA BcdB|g/a/g fg efge|af (3gfe dgba|
ga/g/ fg efge|dBBA Bcdf|egfa gbaf|gedB cAFA:|
|:FGBG DG Bz|B3A BcBA|FGBG DGAB|AFDF BGAF|
G2BG DGBA|B3A Bcdf|egfa gbaf|gedB cAFA:|
17
X: 17
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:G2 BG AGBG|B2 BA BcBA|G2 BG AGBG|A2 AG AcBA|
G2 BG AGBG|B2 BA B2 d2|efed Bdef|~gedB AcBA:|
G2gf edgd|B2BA BcBA|G2 gf edeg|aa/a/ ab agef|
~g3f efge|~B2BA ~B2d2|efed (3Bcd ef|(3gfe dB Ac (3cBA:|
18
X: 18
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Amaj
|:"A"A2 a2 fefa|c2 (cB) cdcB|A2 a2 fefa|"E"B2 (BA) BdcB|
"A"A2 a2 fefa|c2 (cB) c2 (ce)|"D"fefg agfe|"E"(f/g/a) (ec) BdcB:|
|:"A"A2 (cA) eAcA|c2 (cB) cdcB|A2 (cA) eAcA|"E"B2 (BA) BdcB|
"A"A2 (cA) eAcA|c2 (cB) c2 (ce)|"D"fefg agfe|"E"(f/g/a) (ec) BdcB:|
# Added by Tate .
19
X: 19
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:G2BG dGBG|ABBA BcBA|G2BG dGBG|A2AG AcBA|
G2 BG dGBG|ABBA B3d|e3f edef|gedB AGEF:|
|:G2 gf efge|dBBA BcBA|G2gf efge|a2ab agef|
~g3f efge|dBBA B3 d|e3f edef|gedB AGEF:|
20
X: 20
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:"G"G2 BG dGBG|B2 BA BcBA|G2 BG dGBG|"D"A2 AG AcBA|
"G"G2 BG dGBG|B2 BA Bc d2|"C"efed Bdef|"D7"gedB AcBA:|
|:"G"G2 gf edeg|B2 BA BcBA|G2 gf edeg|"D"a2 ab agef|
"G"g2 gf edeg|B2BA Bcdf|"C"edcB cdef|"D7"gedB AcBA:|
21
X: 21
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
G2BG dGBG|B2BA BcBA|G2BG dGBG|A2AG AcBA|
G2BG dGBG|B2BA B2 d2|e3f edef|gedB AcBA:|
G2gf edeg|B2BA BcBA|G2gf edeg|a2ab agef|
g2gf edeg|B2BA B2 d2|e3f edef|gedB AcBA:|
22
X: 22
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:G2 B/A/G dG c/B/A|GBBA BcBA|G2 B/A/G dG B/A/G|A2 AG A/B/c BA|
G2 B/A/G dG c/B/A|GBBA B3 d|e/f/g ed B/c/d ef|gedB A/B/c BA:|
|:G2 gd efgd|B2 BA BcBA|G2 gd efgd|e/f/g ab agef|
g2 bg efge|dBBA B2 B/c/d|e/f/g ed B/c/d ef|gedB A/B/c BA:|
|:g/a/g fg efge|dBBA BcBA|g/a/g fg efgd|AF ~F2 DFAd|
g/a/g fg ecge|d/c/B c/B/A Bcdg|e/f/g ed B/c/d ef|g/f/e dB A/B/c BA:|
23
X: 23
T: Miss McLeod's
R: reel
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
|:G2 BG DGBG|B2 BA BcBA|G2 BG DGBG|A2 AG AcBA|
G2 BG DGBG|B2 BA Bc d2|(3efg ed cdef|1 ~g2fg ecAF:|2 ~g2fg eBBA||
|:G2 gf efg2|ABBA Bdef|g2 gf efge|a2 a2 abaf|
g2 gf efg2|B2BA B2 d2|(3efg ed cdef|1 ~g2fg eBBA:|2 ~g2fg ecAF||

Fifty-two comments

This is a truly international tune. Scottish in origin, it has become a staple of both the Irish and American musical traditions. In Ireland it is most commonly played in the key of G major. In Scotland it’s often played in the (national) key of A major.

In the second part, it’s nice to occasionally play the “high” A part low.

Does anyone have the B part for the setting that is in A major that has
K:A
|:A3c e2 ce|fecf ecBc|A3c e2cB|AFAF EAcB|
A3c e2 ce|fecB ABce|fedc defa|afec BAcB:|

in the A part?

Zina

I’ve always heard the first bar played:

G2 BG dGBG, not the way it is transcribed here.

Miss McLeod’s (reel) by Michael Gorman & Mick Flynn . the sligo champion

T:Mrs McLeod’s
M:C|
L:1/8
C:Niel Gow, Scotland (1727-1807)
S:Michael Gorman & Mick Flynn . the sligo champion
R:reel
N:In Scotland the parts are played in the opposite order, and the tune is
N:A.
D:
H:The original title is “Mrs McLeod of Raasay”.
H:See also other versions, #491, #663
Z:gmp
K:G
G2BG dGBG|GBBA BcBA|G2BG dGBG|FGAB cBAF|
G2BG dGBG|GBBA Bcdf|efed ^cdef|~g3e dBAF:|
|G2gf edgd|B2BA BcbA|g2fg efge|A2AG AcBA|
G2gf edgd|B2BA Bcdf|efed ^cdef|~g3e dBAF|
G2gf edgd|B2BA Bcba|g2fg efgb|a2ag agef|
g2fg edgd|B2BA Bcdf|efed ^cdef|gedg ecAF||

% ABC2Win Version 2.1 31/08/2004

Miss McLeod’s

The Scottish version of this is here https://thesession.org/tunes/340.

The setting I play has elements of the Irish and Scottish versions. It would go nicely on the flute I think:

K: G
|:GABc d2BG|ABBA B2BA|GABc d2BG|AD~D2 ABBA|
GABc d2BG|ABBA B2Bd|e2ed ^cdef|gedB AdBA:|
|:G2g2 edeg|ABBA B2BA|G2g2 edeg|~a3b ageg|
dggf edeg|ABBA B2Bd|e2ed ^cdef|gedB AdBA:|

Do we need another variation?

I was at the “Echoes of Erin” concert last night. Great show! I could swear they played this tune like this, with the D in the first bar played as the low D:

G2BG DGBG|B2BA BcBA|G2BG DGBG|A2AG AcBA

Posted by .

Miss McLeod’s

I’ve been playing the tune like this:

K: Gmaj
G2BG DGBG|B2BA BcBA|G2BG DGBG|A2AG AcBA|
G2BG DGBG|B2BA B2d2|efed Bdef|gedB AcBA:|
G2gf efge|B2BA BcBA|G2gf efge|a2ab agef|
~g3f efge|B2BA B2d2|efed Bdef|gedB AcBA:|

It’s sometimes paired with Garrett Barry’s, or Mister McLeod’s: https://thesession.org/tunes/3434

Liz carroll’s version - “Miss McLeod”

1st track on the 1986 recording “Cherish The Ladies”, played by Liz Carroll. A great version, which unfortunately, I’ve only ever heard played once. Time it was better known.

G,B,DG c2 BG | DGBA BcBA | G,B,DG B2 AG | AFDF AdBA |
GABG dGEG | cGDG BGdG | c2 Bd cded | BddB AdBA :|
GBdb ageg | dBBA B2 AB | GBdb aged | eaga gedB |
GBdb ageg | dBBA B2 GB | edcB cded | BddB AdBA :|

Posted by .

Dave Swarbrick

Dave would play it back to front, and then kick it up into A…gave it a fantastic lift…

X:1
T: Miss McLeod’s
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
R: reel
K: Gmaj
|:G2 g2 edeg|B2 BA BcBA| G2 g2 edeg|A2 AG A cBA|
G2 gf edeg|BcBA B2 d2|edef edef|gfed BcBA:|
|:GA Bc dBGA|B2 BA BcBA|GA Bc dBGB|A2 AG AcBA|
GA Bc dBGA| B2 BA B2 d2|e2 ef edef|gfed BcBA:|
K:Amaj
|:A2 a2 fefa|c2 cB cdcB| A2 a2 fefa|B2 BA B dcB|
A2 ag fefa|cdcB c2 e2|fefg fefg|agfe cdcB:|
|:AB cd ecAB|c2 cB cdcB|AB cd ecAc|B2 BA BdcB|
AB cd ecAB| c2 cB c2 e2|f2 fg fefg|agfe cdcB:|

Here’s the unusual version that Andrew MacNamara recorded. He said he got it from Joe Cooley, but only learned it for the recording and hasn’t played it since. He plays it in A on the C#/D accordion, but I’ve transposed it to G so I can play it on the B/C box. On the recording, he plays it four times through, varying it each time. I’ve transcribed the variations and written out the repeats explicitly. He takes it at around 96 beats per minute (two beats per measure), if I recall correctly.

X:1
T:Miss MacLeod’s (arr. Andrew MacNamara)
S:Andrew Macnamara
R:Reel
L:1/8
M:C|
K:GMAJ %Transposed from AMAJ
GGBG DGBG|BBBA BdBA|GGBd gfed|egdB AdBA|
GGBG DGBG|BBBA GABd|eccB cdea|gedB AGED||
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA BdBA|GGBG DGBd|FEDC B,DA,D|
G,G,BG DGBG|BBBA GABd|eccB cdea|gedB AdBA||
ggag edeg|BBBA GABd|ggag edeg|aabg aged|
ggag edeg|BBBA GABd|eccB cdea|gedB AdBA||
ggag edeg|bbBA GABd|ggag edeg|ac’bg aged|
gbag edeg|BBBA GABd|(3efg fa gbae|gedB AGED||
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA BdBA|GGBd gfed|(3efg dB AGED|
GGBG DGBG|[BB,2]BBA GABd|eccB cdea|gedB (3ABc BA||
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA BdBA|GGBG DGBd|FEDC B,DA,D|
G,G,BG B,GBG|BBAB GABd|eccB cdea|gedB AcBA||
G2 Gg edeg|[Bb][Bb]BA GABd|G2 Gg edeg|a2 bg aged|
ggag edeg|BBBA GABd|ec (3ccc egga|gedB AdBA||
ggag edeg|bbBA GABd|ggag edeg|ac’bg aged|
gbag edeg|BBBA GABd|(3efg fa gbae|gedB (3ABc BA||
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA BdBA|GGBd gfed|(3efg dB AGED|
GGBG DGBG|[BB,]BBA GABd|ec (3ccc egga|gedB (3ABc BA||
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA BdBA|GGBG DGBd|FEDC B,DA,D|
G,G,BG B,GBG|(3BdB AB GABd|eccB cdea|gedB (3ABc BA||
ggag edeg|[bB]bBA GABd|ggag edeg|aabg aged|
ggag edeg|[bB]bBA GABd|ec (3ccB cdea|gedB AcBA||
G2 Gg edeg|[bB]bBA GABd|GGGg edeg|ac’bg aged|
ggfg edeg|BBBA GABd|egfa gbae|gedB (3ABc BA||
[G2G,2] GG DGBG|[B,2B2] BA BdBA|GGBd gfed|(3efg dB (3ABc BA|
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA GABd|eccB cdea|gedB (3ABc BA||
GGBG DGBG|(3BdB BA BdBA|GGBG DGBd|FEDC B,DA,D|
G,2 BG DGBG|BBAB GABd|eccB cdea|gedB AcBA||
[g2G2] Gg edeg|bbbA GABd|ggag edeg|ac’bg aged|
ggag edeg|bbBA GABd|eccB cdea|gedB (3ABc BA||
ggag edeg|bbBA GABd|ggag edeg|ac’bg aged|
gbag edeg|bBBA GABd|(3efg fa g2 (3bag|gedB (3ABc BA|G4 z4|]

Whew, I knew you were mad Gary, but great stuff. I just wish you would start practicing spacing so it would be easier to read from the ABCs, like a space either side of a bar line… I love this kind of madness ~ in moderation of course… 😉

While we’re on the subject I bloody hate the way you leave a space either side of the barline, ‘c’. In the same way as I don’t like to see 2 odd socks hanging together on the washing line.

Don’t worry. I have an electric clothes dryer.

You use a washing line, HA! ~ That’ll be the day. You probably don’t even know what that’s all about. You probably thought it was weird folks hanging clothes on a line for decoration…

Space, music is all about space, the way we space the moments of silence, as much the cream filling… Like good print design or art, equally important you consider what surrounds a thing, the context. The worst designs are so chock full that they confuse and are muddy, too busy… 😉

It’s all silence if you just stare quietly at the ABCs on the screen, except for the hum of the computer’s fan. But try not to smear cream filling all over the keyboard. Or on Mark’s nice clean odd socks.

I’ve just lost my appetite… 😏

This is Howie MacDonald’s version:
X: 76
T: Miss MacLeod
N: as played by Howie MacDonald
M: C|
L: 1/8
Q: 1/2=112
R: reel
K: G
G2gf efge|dBBA BcdB|g3g efge|agfe dc’ba|
(3gag fg efge|dBBA Bcdf|egfa gbaf|gdBd cAFA:|
(3DEG BG DGBG|B3c BAGE|(3DEG BG cGBG|AFDF AcBA|
(3DEG BG DGBG|B3c Bcdf|egfa gbaf|gdBd cAFA:|

Yeah, and fiddlers will have to go out of the safety zone into second position - a nice little surprise.

After a further listen I reckon the first bar in lines 3 and4 of the above transcription should be:
(3DEG BG DGBA|
Also bars 2 and 3 of the A part (first line) are ornamented thus:
|dB{c}BA BcdB|g3{f}g efge|

This is a big seanòs dancing tune.

Aaron Copeland’s version of Miss McLeod’s Reel!

Listening to Lyric FM this morning I heard distinct echoes of Miss McLeod’s reel in a piece called ‘Hoedown’ from ‘Rodeo’. Mad. Another example of the tradition evolving into other musical styles and compositions. Check it out!

I thought it went UP there. I was surprised when the dots didn’t, but then I see Donald’s go up there.

It’s not that bad for us, we can hack it! Without the high note there it doesn’t sound quite right.

…and yes, big time sean nos dance tune. Perfect on a melodeon for a nice step or two!

Recorded by La Bolduc 1939

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/m2/f7/14437.mp3
Note that only the 2nd part of this reel is used in the lilted chorus (refrain turluté) Did you hear “Atchoum!” (Atishoo)? Our writer relished medical themes and this one was about a flu epidemic!

Donna Hébert sought to demystify this other mystical missus/banatee/hussy: The many and only M(r)s McLeod, in this wee article: http://fiddlingdemystified.com/learn/mcleod/ Very interesting!

X: 14 & 15 “Miss McCloud” ~ Donegal - 2/4 original & in 4/4

B: “Dances of Donegal”, collected by Grace Orpen, D.M. Wilkie, London, 1931
The first few pages of this book, and its first tune & dance:
“The Fairy Dance” - https://thesession.org/tunes/424

ITMA: Irish Traditional Music Archive/Taisce Cheol DÚchais Éireann
http://www.itma.ie/
Grace Orpen’s Local Donegal Dances, 1931
http://www.itma.ie/digitallibrary/print-collection/donegal-dances-1931
“Dances of Donegal” collected and edited by Grace Orpen, 1931
Click on ‘32 Pages’ to view them, with Grace Orpen’s ‘Figures’/illustrations…
http://www.itma.ie/digitallibrary/book/dances-of-donegal

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
page 18 - music notation / page 19 - dance description
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Dance: “Strasperry” Reel
Tune: Miss McCloud (2/4-4/4)

Four Dancers: 2 Men and 2 Women

Steps - - - - - - - - - Description - - - - - - - - - Bars (& see ITMA link for figure/illustration 2)

- - - Introduction, ending with partners facing each other. - - - 8

(* BODY)

1 - - - Cross over with partner passing left shoulders. - - - 2
- - - Dance in place. - - - 2
- - - Cross back to place passing right shoulders. - - - 2
- - - Dance in place. - - - 2

2 - - - Cross over to opposite side of set, women passing through the middle. (“Pass Through, turn, Pass Back”)
- - - Dance in place.
- - - Cross back to place in the same manner.
- - - Dance in place.

(* FIGURES)

3 - - - Follow round to the left and back to the right. - - - 8
= - -

4 - - - 1st man goes ove to 2nd woman, while 2nd man goes over to 1st woman. They join in waltz grip and all dance four slipping steps in direction of man’s right shoulder, then turn and dance four slipping steps obliquely across set in direction of man’s left shoulder.
- - - Swing back to original positions completing the tirangle. Fig. 2 - - - 8

5 - - - Partners link left arms and turn once. (4)
- - - Dance in place. (4) - - - 8

6 - - - Women cross over, passing right shoulders. (1)
- - - Men cross over, passing right shoulders. (1) - - - 2
- - - All dance in place. - - - 2
- - - Repeat. (4) - - - 8

- - - Repeat whole dance.

Fig. I - O = man / X = woman

2nd couple
X-O

O-X
1st couple
_________
music-stage

<[ NOTES: Another 4-hand dance with a possible * ‘Body & Figures’ option… ]>

X: 18
Another Cape Breton setting (like X: 10), this time from the playing of Troy MacGillivray on his CD “Live at the Music Room”, recorded on 19th January, 2007.

I have wondered why the title is equally given as Miss Macleod/McLeod and Mrs. Macleod/McLeod. I have read recently that the tune honours the two lovely daughters of Mr. McLeod: The Misses McLeod.

Miss McLeod’s, X:19

This is a version I play, cobbled together from various other versions heard at sessions.

Miss McLeod’s, X:20

Here is a Cape Breton-ish version, in the key it gets played in here in Canada. Slurs are added, as I wrote it out for a student.

Posted by .

Old beginner tune

I am told by my grandfather that this was a common beginner tune in New York of the early ’40s among young fiddlers

Re: Miss McLeod’s

If you play mandolin, fiddle, banjo, or other similar stringed instruments, you can learn both the Irish and the Scottish versions without having to use a capo. Learn the Scottish A major version. To play the Irish version, transpose down two strings and play the second part first.

Re: Miss McLeod’s

x:11 is a good setting - as the octave jump at the start reflects the common US name “Hop high Ladies”. In my fiddle class in Kirkwall, Orkney, we played it this way I believe.

Miss McLeod’s, X:22

This is a version of Miss McLeod’s with a third part added. I learned it many years ago from County Wexford harmonica player Dick Kelly of Oylegate, who’s family ‘The Kelly’s of the Bush’ had been well known uilleann pipers in previous generations. Unfortunately I never recorded him playing it, so this is how I recall him playing it. The extra part is a combination/variation on bits from the first two parts. I’m unsure whether Dick created this additional part himself or whether it had been handed on from the previous generation. The Oylegate area had other piping families, including the Recks of whom Tommy Reck would be the best known. Dick Kelly was one among the many really fine ‘mouth organ’ players that Wexford produced back years ago. Of course Phil Murphy was the most renowned of them, but there were (and still are) many other excellent players of that instrument around the county, all playing that distinctive triplet and vamping style.

Re: Miss McLeod’s

Not Miss McLeod’s but Mrs MacLeod of Raasay, not written for sisters and not written by Neil Gunn. Almost certainly written by Alexander MacDonald of Portree for either the wife or mother on James MacLeod, the last
decent MacLeod laird of Raasay and supporter of local music. His son John sold it to evil slave trader, George Rainy, who cleared and devastated the island. The second most well known tune written for a Raasay person is probably Calum’s Road by Donald Shaw.

Re: Miss McLeod’s

So have we all been in error for so long about the title? I look, as ever, to bogman for enlightenment in this matter.

And another thing… I learned it years ago (from the ‘Allan’s Irish Fiddler’ collection) with the A part phrased as in X:1, but round my way it’s commonly played upside down, starting the A part with the rising phrase as in X:9. Are these established and acceptable alternatives or is one of them, so to speak, just plain wrong?

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Re: Miss McLeod’s

I wouldn’t say “wrong”, but it depends what tradition you’re talking about. In Scotland it’s usually played in it’s original key of “A”, but somewhere in the dim and distant past the tune was picked up by Irish musicians, and in the words of Harry Bradley, came over to Ireland and “went it’s own way”. I can’t recall ever hearing any Irish musician who didn’t play it in the more popular key of “G”.
I’ll post you some information relating to bogman’s post above later.
In the meantime, here’s Seamus from 1m37s :
https://youtu.be/nX6t4KRM4sI

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Re: Miss McLeod’s

A few years back I came across a book in the music section of Aberdeen University library titled “Musical Scotland, Past and Present : Being A Dictionary of Scottish Musicians From About 1400 Till The Present Time”, by David Baptie. It was originally published in 1894. It has been reprinted, and I obtained a copy through eBay.
It has 242 pages with perhaps an average of 7 names on each page.
bogman mentioned the name Alexander MacDonald, and he has an entry on page 107, as follows :
“MacDonald, Sir Alexander (Lord), born Skye , about 1743 : died September 1795. Amateur violinist and composer. A descendant of the famous “Lord Of The Isles”, and the first of his family who was allowed to assume the title of “Lord” ( in 1776 ), it having been attainted in the sixteenth century owing to their frequently joining in rebellions. Sir Alexander was a friend of Neil Gow [sic]*, and a composer of some taste, as is evidenced by his pieces “Lord MacDonald’s Reel”, “The London Highland Society’s Strathspey”, “Mrs McLeod Of Rasay’s” [sic] and “Mrs McKinnon’s, Corry”. His lordship was celebrated as an excellent player of classical music”.
However* - I looked up Baptie’s entry on Niel Gow, to find that he uses the spelling Neil but acknowledges that Gow himself always spelt it Niel. He contradicts himself in Gow’s entry stating that a “Mr McLeod of Rasay [composed] two reels, “Lord Mauchlin” and “Mrs McLeod Of Rasay”.
“Mr McLeod Of Rasay” does not appear to rate a mention elsewhere as an entry in the book.
I have no way of knowing how accurate or reliable Baptie was in his listings, so can’t say for definite which, if either, is true.

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Re: Miss McLeod’s

I would think the Mr McLeod of Rasay is likely to have been the Laird James mentioned above. He was a fiddler and uncle to Eliza Ross, author of the Eliza Ross manuscript. She notated much of the music she heard played by her uncle James and the piper John MacKay. My guess is Alexander MacDonald wrote this tune. It doesn’t appear in Eliza’s manuscript, it’s very much in what Keith Norman MacDonald describes as “Skye style” and in the Skye collection MacDonald credits many of the tunes including many by Neil Gow. Given his being from Skye and his collecting of the music I think the likelihood is he attributed this tune correctly. There’s no way to know for sure of course.