Captain O’Kane waltz

Also known as Banks Of The Danube, The Banks Of The Danube, Cailin Tighe Moir, Captain Henry O’Kain, Captain O’Kain, Captain O’Kane’s, Captain Oakhain, The Chevalier’s Lament, Chief Keane, Chief Of The Keane, The Dying Hussar’s Lament, The Dying Hussar, The Dying Huzzar, Fwyn Seren Fain Syw, Giolla An Bimhoir, The Keane, Lament For A Dying Hussar, Lament For A Wounded Hussar, Lament For Captain Henry O’Kane, Taoıseaċ Ó Catháın, The Wounded Hussar’s Lament, The Wounded Hussar, The Wounded Huzzar, The Wounded.

There are 56 recordings of a tune by this name.

Captain O’Kane has been added to 2 tune sets.

Captain O'Kane has been added to 210 tunebooks.

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Nine settings

X: 1
T: Captain O'Kane
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmin
G/2F/2 | DGA B2 A/2G/2 | A/2B/2c/2B/2A/2G/2 FGA | BdB d/2c/2B/2A/2G/2F/2 | DGG G2 G/2F/2 |
DGA B2 A/2G/2 | A/2B/c/2B/2A/2G/2 FGA | f3/2e/2d d/2c/2B/2A/2G/2F/2 | DGG G2 G/2A/2|
Bdd d2 c/2B/2 | Acc c2 f/2e/2 | dg3/2g/2 gab | dg^f g2 g/2a/2 |
bag fed | cA f F2 G/2A/2 | BdB d/2c/2B/2A/2G/2F/2 | DGF G2 ||
X: 2
T: Captain O'Kane
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmin
M: 6/8
|: G/F/ |DBA B2 A/G/ | A/B/c/B/A/G/ FGA | BdB cB/A/G/F/ | DGG G2 :|
|: G/A/ |Bdd d2 c/B/ | Acc c2 f | d>g^f g>ab | dg^f g2 g/a/ |
bag f>ed | d/c/B/A/f FGA | BdB d/c/B/A/G/F/ | DGG G2 :|
X: 3
T: Captain O'Kane
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmin
M: 3/4
|: GF |D2 B2 A2 | B4 AG | AB cB AG | F2 G2 A2 |
B2 d2 B2 | c2 BA GF | D2 G2 G2 | G4 :|
|: GA |B2 d2 d2 | d4 cB | A2 c2 c2 | c4 f2 |
d3 g ^f2 | g3 a b2 | d2 g2 ^f2 | g4 ga |
b2 a2 g2 | f3 e d2 | dc BA f2 | F2 G2 A2 |
B2 d2 B2 | dc BA GF | D2 G2 G2 | G4 :|
X: 4
T: Captain O'Kane
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Amin
M: 3/4
|: AG |E2 A2 B2 | c4 BA | Bc dc BA | G2 A2 B2 |
c2 e2 c2 | ed cB AG | E2 A2 ^G2 | A4 :|
|: AB |c2 e2 e2 | e4 dc | B2 d2 d2 | d4 cB |
A2 a2 a2 | a2 b2 c’2 | e2 a2 ^g2 | a4 ab |
c’2 b2 a2 | g2 f2 e2 | ed cB g2 | G3 A B2 |
c2 e2 c2 | ed cB AG | E2 A2 ^G2 | A4 :|
X: 5
T: Captain O'Kane
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Emin
|:ED|B,2E2F2|G4FE|FG AG FE|D2E3F|
G2B3G|BA GF ED|B,2E2EF|E4:|
|:EF|G2B2B2|B4AG|F2A2A2|A4dc|B2e3e|e2f2g2|
B2e2^d2|e4ef|g2f2e2|d2c2B2|AGF2d2|
D3EF2|G2B3G|BA GF ED|B,2E2EF|E4:|
|:ED|"Em"B,2E2F2|G4FE|"D"FG AG FE|"Bm"D2E2F2|
"C"G2B2G2|BA GF ED|"Em"B,2E2ED|"Am"E4:|
|:EF|"Em"G2B2B2|B4AG|"D"F2A2A2|"Bm"A4dc|"Am"B2e3e|"C"e2f2g2|
"Am"B2e2^d2|"C"e4 "D"ef|"Em"g2f2e2|"Em7"d2c2B2|"D"AGF2d2|"Bm"D2E2F2
|1"C"G2B2G2|BA GF ED|"Em"B,2E2EF|"Am"E4:|2
"Am"G2B2G2|"Em"BA GF ED|"Am"B,2E2EF|"Em"E4|]
|:BA|G2G2A2|B4AG|AB cB AG|F2G2A2|
B2d2B2|dc BA GF|G2B2A2|B4:|
|:BA|G2d2d2|d4cB|A2d3e|f4d2|e2g3f|g2a2b2|
e2g2f2|g4 ga|b2a2g2|g2e2d2|AGF2d2|F2G2A2|1
B2d2B2|dc BA GF|G2B2A2|B4:|2
B2d2B2|dc BA GF|G2B2A2|B4|]
X: 6
T: Captain O'Kane
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Emin
|:ED|B,EF G2 F/E/ | F/G/A/G/F/E/ DEF | GBG B/A/G/F/E/D/ | B,EE E2 E/D/|
B,EF G2 F/E/ | F/G/A/G/F/E/ DEF | GBG B/A/G/F/E/D/ | B,EE E2:||
|:EF| GBB B2 A/G/ | FAA A2 d/c/ | B>e^d e>fg | Be^d e2 e/f/ |
gfe d>cB | AFd DEF | GBG B/A/G/F/E/D/ | B,EE E2:||
# Added by JACKB .
X: 7
T: Captain O'Kane
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Bmin
M: 3/4
|: BA |F2 B2 c2 | d4 cB | cd ed cB | A2 B2 c2 |
d2 f2 d2 | fe dc BA | F2 B2 ^A2 | B4 :|
|: Bc |d2 f2 f2 | f4 ed | c2 e2 e2 | e4 ag |
f2 b3 b | b2 c’2 d’2 | f2 b2 ^a2 | b4 bc’ |
d’2 c’2 b2 | a2 g2 f2 | fe dc a2 | A4 Bc |
d2 f2 d2 | fe dc BA | F2 B2 ^A2 | B4 :|
X: 8
T: Captain O'Kane
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmin
M: 3/4
|: GF |D2 G2 A2 | B4 AG | AB cB AG | F2 G2 A2 |
B2 d2 B2 | dc BA GF | D2 G2 ^F2 | G4 :|
|: GA |B2 d2 d2 | d4 cB | A2 c2 c2 | c4 BA |
G2 g3 g | g2 a2 b2 | d2 g2 ^f2 | g4 ga |
b2 a2 g2 | f2 e2 d2 | dc BA f2 | F3 G A2 |
B2 d2 B2 | dc BA GF | D2 G2 ^F2 | G4 :|
X: 9
T: Captain O'Kane
R: waltz
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: Emin
ED |B,2 E2 F2 | G4 FE | FG AG FE | D2 E2 F2 |
G2 B2 G2 | BA GF ED | B,2 E2 E2 | E4 ED |
B,2 E2 F2 | G4 FE | FG AG FE | D2 E2 F2 |
G2 B2 B2 | BA GF ED | B,2 E2 E2 | E4 ||
EF |G2 B2 B2 | B4 AG | F2 A2 A2 | A4 dc |
B2 e2 ^d2 | e3 f g2 | B2 e2 ^d2 | e4 ef |
g3 f e2 | d3 c B2 | A2 F2 d2 | D2 E2 F2 |
G2 B2 G2 | BA GF ED | B,2 E2 E2 | E4 |]

Twenty-seven comments

Wounded Hussar (Lament)

Someone was asking about this tune - or at least one by this name. I think I’ve heard an accordian player playing what he called the wounded hussar lament that was a fair bit different. Anyway, I learned this one from Peter Cooper’s Irish Fiddle Player book. It is really an air, not a jig and should be played in a slow, rather meandering way (according to Peter).

This version is based on that of a 19th century English fiddle player, John Moore of Shropshire (in the collection "Thr Ironbridge Hornpipe" - Dragonfly Music, 1991). Peter has a recording of it on his 1993 "Wounded Hussar" album. There is an Eminor version in O’Neill’s Music of Ireland. John Doherty recorded a version - possibly in E minor - on the "Pedlar’s Pack" album.

Peter has quite a bit to say about the air in his book (which I recommend, lots of good stuff in that). Apparently this lament was composed by O’Carolan for Captain O’Kane. A quote from Patrick O’Leary (in O’Neill’s Irish Minstrels & Musicians), described O’Kane as ‘the hero of a hundred fights from Landon to Oudenarde, who, when old and war-worn, tottered back from the Low Countries to his birthplace to die, and found himself not only a stranger, but an outlawed, disinherited, homeless wanderer in the ancient territories that his fathers ruled as Lords of Limavady. His friend and sympathizer, the illustrious Turlough O’Carolan, has immortalized his name in strains the most plaintive and touching.’

Indeed, when you play the tune, it is easy to see in front of you, a battle-torn forlorn soldier, limping lost through desolate lands.

Just come home from a wonderful concert in Bonn, Germany, given by Christy Barry, Gerry O’Connor and Tony MacMahon who played the wounded hussar as a slow air. It was very impressive and you really could leave your thinkings fly around and feel the wounds. I’d like to get the air version.

The Wounded Hussar

It’s hard for me to see how the tune, as written here, is the same one played on Lunasa’s The Kinnity Sessions. Is this really the same tune?

A big, big applause to the two women!

Captain O’Kane

this is a beautiful song composed by O’Carolan. i heard a very haunting version on the fiddle by Seamus McGuire.

“Captain O’Kane / O’Kain” ~ The Fiddler’s Companion

http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/CAPT_CAPU.htm

"CAPTAIN O’KANE/O’KAIN. AKA and see “Cailin tighe moir,” "Captain Henry O’Kain," “Giolla an Bimhoir,” "The Wounded Hussar," "The Small Birds Rejoice." Irish, Air or Planxty (6/8 time). E Aeolian (Matthiesen, O’Neill): G Aeolian (Gow): A Minor (O’Farrell): D Minor (Martin). Standard. AB (Complete Collection, Matthiesen, O’Neill): AAB (Martin): AABB (Gow, O’Farrell). O’Farrell directs: “Slow.” ~

“Captain O’Kane” is thought to have been composed by blind Irish harper Turlough O’Carolan (1670 - 1738) for his friend Captain O’Kane (or O’Cahan), a sporting Irishman of a distinguished County Antrim family well-known in his day as “Slasher O’Kane” (Donal O’Sullivan, Carolan, The Life and Times, based on information in Hardiman’s Irish Minstrelsy, 1831). O’Neill (1922) says: “We learn from Alexander Campbell’s song ‘The Wounded Hussar’ printed with the music in Smith’s Irish Minstrel (Edinburgh, 1825) the O’Kain was Captain Henry O’Kain who died of his wounds ‘on the banks of the dark rolling Danube.’” O’Sullivan’s attribution is based on a comment by Hardimann (who said O’Carolan wrote it) and because of stylistic similarities with other O’Carolan works. O’Neill (1913) quotes Patrick O’Leary, an Australian correspondent, who wrote that the Captain of the title was “the hero of a hundred fights, from Landon to Oudenarde, who, when old and war-worn, tottered back from the Low Countries to his birthplace to die, and found himself not only a stranger, but an outlawed, disinherited, homeless wanderer in the ancient territory that his fathers ruled as Lords of Limavady.” The earliest printing of the tune Captain Francis O’Neill could located was in James Aird’s 1788 Selection of Scotch, English, Irish and Foreign Airs (Vol. 3), although he also found it (under the title “Captain Oakhain: A Favourite Irish Tune") in McGoun’s Repository of Scots and Irish Airs, Strathspeys, Reels, etc.(Glasgow, 1803)—the same title and presumably the same tune was printed in Alexander McGlashan’s 1786 collection.

***
The song “The Wounded Hussar” was written to the melody by Alexander Campbell (O’Sullivan gives his name as Thomas) and appears in Smith’s Irish Minstrel (Edinburgh, 1825). It was also included in Surenne’s Songs of Ireland without Words (Edinburgh, 1854). The Scots poet Robert Burns wrote his song “The Chevalier’s Lament” to the tune of “Captain O’Kean”.

X:2
T:Captain Oakhain
L:1/8
M:6/8
N:”A favourite Irish Tune”
S:McGlashan – Reels (c. 1786)
K:g minor
|: G/F/ |
DBA B2 A/G/ | A/B/c/B/A/G/ FGA | BdB cB/A/G/F/ | DGG G2 :|
|: G/A/ |
Bdd d2 c/B/ | Acc c2 f | d>g^f g>ab | dg^f g2 g/a/ |
bag f>ed | d/c/B/A/f FGA | BdB d/c/B/A/G/F/ | DGG G2:|

Oakhain? That’s certainly not an Irish spelling. It’s O’Kane in O’Neill’s of Ireland.

Why isn’t it played in E minor ? A cellist who plays it at an eclectic session I attend had this suggestion from another cellist on a first visit.
Yes, indeed, why ?

“Captain O’Kane / O’Kain / Oakhain” ~ given the actual 3/4 of this

X: 3
T: Captain Oakhain
S: McGlashan – Reels, 1786
N: "A favourite Irish Tune"
N: From 6/8 to 3/4 to better represent the melody in play…
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
K: g minor
|: GF |\
D2 B2 A2 | B4 AG | AB cB AG | F2 G2 A2 |
B2 d2 B2 | c2 BA GF | D2 G2 G2 | G4 :|
|: GA |\
B2 d2 d2 | d4 cB | A2 c2 c2 | c4 f2 |
d3 g ^f2 | g3 a b2 | d2 g2 ^f2 | g4 ga |
b2 a2 g2 | f3 e d2 | dc BA f2 | F2 G2 A2 |
B2 d2 B2 | dc BA GF | D2 G2 G2 | G4 :|

For winds, an instrument in C or Bb is best to play it in g minor. You would start on with the first finger down on a Bb instrument and with the top two fingers down on a C instrument ~

Bb ~ x o o o o o

C.. ~ x x o o o o

Bb~C
x ~ x
o ~ x
o ~ o
o ~ o
o ~ o
o ~ o

Another Key

In Tómas O Canainn’s book, Traditional Slow Airs of Ireland, it is shown in A minor in 3/4 time, and it goes up to a high C. Watch the cats run in horror.

Posted by .

Wounded Hussar

But what/.where are the words ?

Robert Burns’ words. .

Found this at http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/CAPT_CAPU.htm#CAPTAIN_O%27KANE/O%27KAIN

The song “The Wounded Hussar” was written to the melody by Alexander Campbell (O’Sullivan gives his name as Thomas) and appears in Smith’s Irish Minstrel (Edinburgh, 1825). It was also included in Surenne’s Songs of Ireland without Words (Edinburgh, 1854). The Scots poet Robert Burns wrote his song “The Chevalier’s Lament” to the tune of “Captain O’Kean”. It goes:

***

The small birds rejoice at the green leaves returning,
The murmuring streamlet runs clear the vale;
The primroses blow in the dows of the morning,
And wild scattered cowslips bedeck the green dale.
But what can give pleasure, and what can seem fair,
When the lingering moments, are numbered by care;
No birds sweetly singing, nor flowers gaily sprining,
Can soothe the sad bosom, of joyless despair.

***

The deed that I dared, could it merit their malice,
A king and a father, to place on his throne;
His right are these hills, and his right are these valleys,
Where wild birds find shelter, but I can find none.
But ‘tis not my suff’ring, thus wretched forlorn,
My brave gallant friends, tis your ruin I mourn;
Your faith proved so loyal, in hot bloody trail,
Alas, can I make it, no sweeter return.

“Captain O’Kane” / “The Wounded” ~

X: 4
T: Captain O’Kane
T: The Wounded Hussar
T: The Wounded
N: C whistle/flute/uilleann pipes = g minor (D fingering)
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
R: lament, planxty, air
K: Amin
|: AG |\
E2 A2 B2 | c4 BA | Bc dc BA | G2 A2 B2 |
c2 e2 c2 | ed cB AG | E2 A2 ^G2 | A4 :|
|: AB |\
c2 e2 e2 | e4 dc | B2 d2 d2 | d4 cB |
A2 a2 a2 | a2 b2 c’2 | e2 a2 ^g2 | a4 ab |
c’2 b2 a2 | g2 f2 e2 | ed cB g2 | G3 A B2 |
c2 e2 c2 | ed cB AG | E2 A2 ^G2 | A4 :|

X: 5
T: Captain O’Kane
T: The Wounded Hussar
T: The Wounded
N: Bb whistle/flute/uilleann pipes = g minor (D fingering)
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
R: air, planxty, lament
K: Bmin
|: BA |\
F2 B2 c2 | d4 cB | cd ed cB | A2 B2 c2 |
d2 f2 d2 | fe dc BA | F2 B2 ^A2 | B4 :|
|: Bc |\
d2 f2 f2 | f4 ed | c2 e2 e2 | e4 ag |
f2 b3 b | b2 c’2 d’2 | f2 b2 ^a2 | b4 bc’ |
d’2 c’2 b2 | a2 g2 f2 | fe dc a2 | A4 Bc |
d2 f2 d2 | fe dc BA | F2 B2 ^A2 | B4 :|

X: 6
T: Captain O’Kane
T: The Wounded Hussar
T: The Wounded
N: D whistle/flute ~ with a little effort (F natural/Bb/Eb) ;-)
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
R: air, planxty, lament
K: Gmin
|: GF |\
D2 G2 A2 | B4 AG | AB cB AG | F2 G2 A2 |
B2 d2 B2 | dc BA GF | D2 G2 ^F2 | G4 :|
|: GA |\
B2 d2 d2 | d4 cB | A2 c2 c2 | c4 BA |
G2 g3 g | g2 a2 b2 | d2 g2 ^f2 | g4 ga |
b2 a2 g2 | f2 e2 d2 | dc BA f2 | F3 G A2 |
B2 d2 B2 | dc BA GF | D2 G2 ^F2 | G4 :|

X: 7
T: Captain O’Kane
T: The Wounded Hussar
T: The Wounded
N: F whistle/flute/uilleann pipes = g minor (D fingering)
N: Playing that first B up an octave, instead of the unachievable low B,
M: 3/4
L: 1/8
R: air, planxty, lament
K: Emin
|: ED |\
B2 E2 F2 | G4 FE | FG AG FE | D2 E2 F2 | ~

O’Kane’s/Wounded Hussar in Em

I first heard this from the playing of Peter Ostroushko off a live radio broadcast of “The Prarie Home Companion” in the early ‘90’s. He played this as a waltz just prior to launching into a 3 jig medley previously submitted:
https://thesession.org/tunes/10078
https://thesession.org/tunes/10083
https://thesession.org/tunes/10086

Over the years, the tune has become one of my favorites,
yet my way is not much different from Carolan’s. I play it as a slow waltz, 126-129 bpm.

Here is my way with it:
X:22
T:Captain O’ Kane
M:3/4
L:1/8
C:Turlough Carolan
K:EMin
|:ED|B,2E2F2|G4FE|FG AG FE|D2E3F|
G2B3G|BA GF ED|B,2E2EF|E4:|
|:EF|G2B2B2|B4AG|F2A2A2|A4dc|B2e3e|e2f2g2|
B2e2^d2|e4ef|g2f2e2|d2c2B2|AGF2d2|
D3EF2|G2B3G|BA GF ED|B,2E2EF|E4:|


Here is Peter’s Ostroushko’s way with it:
(the long 1st and 2nd endings are for different chords the 2nd time through)
X:23
T:Captain O’ Kane
M:3/4
L:1/8
C:Turlough Carolan
N:Peter Ostroushko’s version
Z:fiddlerdan
K:EMin
|:ED|"Em"B,2E2F2|G4FE|"D"FG AG FE|"Bm"D2E2F2|
"C"G2B2G2|BA GF ED|"Em"B,2E2ED|"Am"E4:|
|:EF|"Em"G2B2B2|B4AG|"D"F2A2A2|"Bm"A4dc|"Am"B2e3e|"C"e2f2g2|
"Am"B2e2^d2|"C"e4 "D"ef|"Em"g2f2e2|"Em7"d2c2B2|"D"AGF2d2|"Bm"D2E2F2
|1"C"G2B2G2|BA GF ED|"Em"B,2E2EF|"Am"E4:|2
"Am"G2B2G2|"Em"BA GF ED|"Am"B,2E2EF|"Em"E4|]

Yet another way with it, this time a harmony version:
X:24
T:Captain O’ Kane, harmony
M:3/4
L:1/8
C:Turlough Carolan
N:harmony version
Z:fiddlerdan
K:EMin
|:BA|G2G2A2|B4AG|AB cB AG|F2G2A2|
B2d2B2|dc BA GF|G2B2A2|B4:|
|:BA|G2d2d2|d4cB|A2d3e|f4d2|e2g3f|g2a2b2|
e2g2f2|g4 ga|b2a2g2|g2e2d2|AGF2d2|F2G2A2|1
B2d2B2|dc BA GF|G2B2A2|B4:|2
B2d2B2|dc BA GF|G2B2A2|B4|]

X: 7 & 8 ~ “Captain O’Kane / O’Kain” / “The Wounded Hussar”

N: # Added by ceolachan October 1st, 2009

Above YouTube in 3/4 is more in line with the ‘lament’ “Captain O’Kane”

Eliza Carthy and Saul Rose play a set of tunes in the woods near Robin Hood’s Bay.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_iUWzE-fZK4


"Not an slow air !"
# Posted by David50 November 16th, 2014

Nope! Not ‘sean nos’, not a take that is drawn out and syrupy, bathetic, for which there’s no shortage. Though listed as "The Wounded Hussar", Eliza Carthy and Saul Rose ~ David50’sYouTube link ~ are really playing it as the ‘lament’ "Captain O’Kane", though taking it a little brisk. I prefer it with that steady beat, in 3/4 time, but not so up tempo, more akin to a slow march, not mawkish.

This melody has it all as a lament, sad, moody, reflective. It does not need to be gussied up and dipped in honey and stretched out like taffy. It does the job without needing a lot of adornment, of B movie over sentimentalization. It just is, great without too much fuss, accomplishing so much simply… Too often, supposedly based on the singing of the relative song and lyrics "The Wounded Hussar", folks get carried away, my opinion, and too often tend to murder the air of it. Some might call it ‘sean nos’, but for me it is "Jonathan Linvingston Seagull". Hey, lots of folks seem to like things that way, and six cubes of sugar in their tea. I don’t… :-/

Fintan Vallely’s take on it, another YouTube link above, slainte’s, was lovely, except ~ spoiled by smashing a set of reels on the end of it… ;-P OUCH! Give it ‘air’, space… But, the reels on their own, also lovely, just in the wrong place at the wrong time, in my sense of it all…

Eliza Carthy and Saul Rose are playing it as a waltz, their reason for taking it briskly. :-D It’s not bad, but I still prefer it as a lament rather than something to waltz to…

Re: Captain O’Kane

So Strange - The Captain O’Kane most commonly played is nothing like the videos here… also, it’s not a jig.

It’s played as an air or a waltz…… I like Fergal Scahill’s take on it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DHXorAYOcVc


Also, evidently it’s not known to be an O’Carolan piece, but rather attributed to him for good reasons having to do with style and anecdotal stories.

Re: Captain O’Kane

Nice! - I also like Fergal Scahill’s take on it…

And no, obviously, it’s not a jig. In spirit and modern sensibilities it’s never 6/8, it’s 3/4…

X: 9 Captain O’Kane ~ Donal O’Sullivan transcription

S: ‘Carolan: The Life, Times and Music of an Irish Harper’ - in 2 volumes – by Donal O’Sullivan
ISBN: 0-9503784-8-8

Transcription – Volume 1, page 235 – with two exceptions X:6 above (# Added by JACKB July 1st, 2014) is identical to O’Sullivan’s transcription, including having been notated as 6/8 (One likely reason for 6/8 and 2/4 being used in the past instead, in some instances, of 3/4 and 4/4 is the old practice of ‘block printing’, something I’ve experience with. The denser barred groupings of 6/8 & 2/4 are much easier to set and print.):

1st Part (A) Bar 5 on the repeat, only one note:
| JACKB | ~ | Donal O’Sullivan |
| GBG B/A/G/F/E/D/ | ~ | GBB B/A/G/F/E/D/ | =
| G2 B2 G2 | BA GF ED | ~ | G2 B2 B2 | BA GF ED |
2nd Part (B) Bar 3, length of the first two notes:
| B>e^d e>fg | ~ | Be^d e>fg | =
| B3 c ^d2 | e3 f g2 | ~ | B2 e2 ^d2 | e3 f g2 |

Donal O’Sullivan’s transcription also opens:
ED | = E2 D2 | ~ adjusted for fit in this 3/4 transcription to ED |, in line with the repeat of the A-part ( | E4 ED | )… This transcription in all other instances follows O’Sullivan’s exactly, note for note, fully notated, no repeats…

Notes – Volume 2, page 82; sources given on pages 3 & 4

133. ‘Captain O’Kane’

- - ‘Source’: P, p. 53: ‘Captain O’Cain’. Other versions: A, MS. 33, book 4, p.36: ‘Cailín tighe móir’, against which Bunting has written in pencil, ‘A good set of the Wounded Hussar’; D, i, p. 175: ‘Giolla an bimhoir’, against which Petrie has written in pencil, ‘See Captain O’Kane’ (printed in W, no. 1378, but without Petrie’s note); Q, p. 36: ‘Captain O’Kane’.
- - Bunting’s note is explained by the fact that Thomas Campbell’s once popular song, ‘The Wounded Hussar’, was sung to a version of our air. This, with Campbell’s words, is on a loose sheet in G, sent to Joyce by Matthew Archdeacon, of Banteer, County Cork.
- - None of the above sources attributes this air to Carolan, but its style resembles his, and Hardiman states (p.lix) that it was composed by him for ‘Captain O’Kane or O’Cahan, of a distinguished Antrim family, a sporting Irishman, well known in his day by the name of “Slasher O’Kane”.’ I have been unable to find any further particulars about the Captain.

Conspectus of Authorities (sources - in order of listing) – Volume Two, pages 3 & 4:

P. – O’Farrell. ‘Collection of National Irish Music for the Union Pipes’. London. [c. 1797-1800.]

A. – The Bunting MSS. in the Library of the Queen’s University, Belfast.

D. – The Petrie MSS. in the National Museum, Dublin.

W. – Charles Stanford. ‘Complete Petrie Collection of Ancient Iris Music’. London. Parts I and II, 1902; Part III, 1905.

Q. – S. Holden. ‘A Collection of Old-Established Irish Slow and Quick Tunes’. Books I and II. Dublin. [1806-7.]