Norrgimma barndance

Also known as Schottis Från Norrgimma, Schottische From Norrgimma.

Norrgimma has been added to 12 tunebooks.

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Four settings

1
X: 1
T: Norrgimma
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Cmaj
G2|E2 G2 C2 DE | F2 A2 D3 c | B2 cd G2 AB |c2 cB (3ABA G2|
E2 G2 C2 DE | F2 A2 D3 c | B2 cd G2 AB |c2 e2 c2 :|
EF|G2 EG c2 E2 | FEFG A2 A2 | G,2 B,D G2 B,2 | CDEF G2 EF |
G2 EG c2 E2 | FEFG A2 A2 | G,2 B,D GFED | C2 c2 c2 :|
2
X: 2
T: Norrgimma
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
B2 d2 G2 AB | c2 e2 A3 g | f2 ga d2 ef | .g2 gf (3efe d2 |
B2 d2 G2 AB | c2 e2 A3 g | f2 ga d2 ef | g2 b2 g2 :|
d2 Bd g2 B2 | cBcd .e2 e2 | D2 FA d2 F2 | GABc d2 Bc |
d2 Bd g2 B2 | cBcd .e2 e2 | D2 FA dcBA | G2 g2 g2 :|
3
X: 3
T: Norrgimma
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
B4 d2 | G4 AB | c4 e2 | A4 g2 | f4 ga | d4 ef | g4 gf | (3efe d2 c2 |
B4 d2 | G4 AB | c4 e2 | A4 g2 | f4 ga | d4 ef | g4 b2 | g4 :|
d4 Bd | g4 B2 | c3 B cd | e4 e2 | D4 FA | d4 F2 | G3 A Bc | d4 Bc |
d4 Bd | g4 B2 | c3 B cd | e4 e2 | D4 FA | d3 c BA | G4 g2 | g4 :|
4
X: 4
T: Norrgimma
R: barndance
M: 4/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
B4 d2 | G4 AB | c4 e2 | A4 g2 | f4 ga | d4 ef | g4 gf | (3efe d2 c2 |
B4 d2 | G2 FG AB | c3 B cd | e4 fg | f4 ga | d4 ef | g3 c' ba | g4 :|
d4 Bd | g4 B2 | c3 B cd | e4 e2 | D4 FA | d4 F2 | G3 A Bc | d4 Bc |
d4 Bd | g4 b2 | c'3 b ba | e4 e2 | D4 FA | d3 c BA | G3 Bd f | g4 :|

Twelve comments

Not really a hornpipe!

This was transcribed from the playing of Jan-Anders Andersson and his friend Staffan Berg, on two old one-row boxes in C. He credits to fiddler Lars-Olof Larsson.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_eupBWR4EM


It might be just as easily notated in 2/4, and without too much surgery made into a nice waltz or mazurka. They play it at an easy pace, and swing it slightly.

My transcription is from the playing of two people as a duo — I haven’t heard the tune anywhere else before, and I have the feeling that a single player could do quite a bit more in the way of ornamenting the melody.

I think it makes a nice hornpipe, and it won’t let you play it too fast or it sounds silly. Some free-standing quarter notes are played staccato to inflect the rhythm. Those are easy enough to find! And it has quite a bounce at such little cost… what economy! Many of the variations that the two players in the video perform are intuitive to the melody and rhythm, really.

A-part, Bar 4 after the triplet, at least one of the players replaces the G2 with GF to keep the momentum rolling. This idea manifests itself in other places, as well.

B-part, bar 7 you might do well to play the descending 4 notes
| … GEFD| instead of |… GFED| etc.

They are both playing one-row melodeons, and so some of the ascending and descending runs can be played as half-chords with the nearest above or below button. Also, the quarter notes at the ends can be played as rhythm-inflected chords.

G

K: G maj
d2|\
B2 d2 G2 AB | c2 e2 A3 g | f2 ga d2 ef | .g2 gf (3efe d2 |
B2 d2 G2 AB | c2 e2 A3 g | f2 ga d2 ef | g2 b2 g2 :|
Bc|\
d2 Bd g2 B2 | cBcd .e2 e2 | D2 FA d2 F2 | GABc d2 Bc |
d2 Bd g2 B2 | cBcd .e2 e2 | D2 FA dcBA | G2 g2 g2 :|

probably sounds very nice in D, too

Well, an old friend… I haven’t played this in a long time. Thanks gravel, something to bring back memories and excite my feet just before going out for the evening, and, while motivating my feet, setting me a little more at ease mentally… 😉

It’s as it says, a lovely schottische, and it can fit quite nicely either here under hornpipes or under barndances, belonging to that family of swing…

Repackaged as a waltz..

Without any ornaments, here is the original melody transposed to G and rearranged in 3/4 time

M:3/4
L:1/8
K: G maj
d2|\
B4 d2 | G4 AB | c4 e2 | A4 g2 | f4 ga | d4 ef | g4 gf | (3efe d2 c2 |
B4 d2 | G4 AB | c4 e2 | A4 g2 | f4 ga | d4 ef | g4 b2 | g4 :|
Bc|\
d4 Bd | g4 B2 | c3 B cd | e4 e2 | D4 FA | d4 F2 | G3 A Bc | d4 Bc |
d4 Bd | g4 B2 | c3 B cd | e4 e2 | D4 FA | d3 c BA | G4 g2 | g4 :|

Another take in 3/4

There is a lot of room to switch things around, if you divide the half notes more or less consistently throughout the entire tune, you might come out with a decent mazurka.

But while still trying to keep the general feel of a waltz, here are some ideas playing with the back 4 bars of each part, leaving the first 4 intact to compare.

M:3/4
L:1/8
K: G maj
dc|\
B4 d2 | G4 AB | c4 e2 | A4 g2 | f4 ga | d4 ef | g4 gf | (3efe d2 c2 |
B4 d2 | G2 FG AB | c3 B cd | e4 fg | f4 ga | d4 ef | g3 c’ ba | g4 :|
Bc|\
d4 Bd | g4 B2 | c3 B cd | e4 e2 | D4 FA | d4 F2 | G3 A Bc | d4 Bc |
d4 Bd | g4 b2 | c’3 b ba | e4 e2 | D4 FA | d3 c BA | G3 Bd f | g4 :|

No, sorry gravel, it ain’t no mazurka, not without a hell of a lot of doctoring… But it makes an alright waltz…

It’s great - and the various Swedish music links are appreciated.

Brilliant! ~ those two squeezin’ this out ~ lovely stuff! 🙂

Thanks for the reminder nicholas, I’d forgot to express my appreciation on that count. It raised a smile and got my feet moving, was a joy…

The player on the left and (owner of the youtube channel) is featured on this CD.

http://www.hagfors.se/kultur/kulturkontoretsbokshop/bjorklundslatar

He plays solo on 3 tracks, and as a duo with fiddler Per-Thomas Eriksson on three more. 39 tracks in all, the rest of the CD consists of the melodies of Carl-Johan Björklund played by other musicians. It is outstanding music.

I forgot to mention, there is also a book of written music that corresponds with the CD. You might contact the player for more details. 🙂