John MacDonald Of Glencoe polka

Also known as John McDonald Of Glencoe.

There are 5 recordings of a tune by this name.

John MacDonald Of Glencoe has been added to 1 tune set.

John MacDonald Of Glencoe has been added to 12 tunebooks.

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One setting

X: 1
T: John MacDonald Of Glencoe
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Amix
|: e/2>d/2 | c/2<e/2A Aa | c/2>A/2c/2<e/2 fe/2>d/2 | ce Ac | B/2<G/2B/2>c/2 de/2>d/2 |
c/2<e/2A Aa | c/2>A/2c/2<e/2 fe/2>d/2 | c/2>d/2e/2>A/2 c/2>B/2d/2<G/2 | BA A :|
|: c/2>d/2 | eA/2>c/2 ag/2>f/2 | eA ce | df/2>d/2 c/2<A/2e/2>c/2 | B/2<G/2B/2>c/2 dc/2>d/2 |
[1 eA/2>c/2 ag/2>f/2 | eA cd | c/2>d/2e/2>A/2 c/2>B/2d/2<G/2 | BA A :|
[2 ea ce | A/2>A/2A/2>B/2 cd | c/2>d/2e/2>A/2 c/2>B/2d/2<G/2 | BA A ||
e/2>d/2 | cA/2>c/2 c/2<e/2A/2>c/2 | df/2<a/2 ec/2<A/2 | cA/2>c/2 c/2<e/2A/2>c/2 | BG/2>B/2 B/2<e/2d/2>B/2 |
cA/2>c/2 c/2<e/2A/2>c/2 | df/2<a/2 ec/2<A/2 | c/2>d/2e/2>A/2 c/2>B/2d/2<G/2 | BA Ae/2>d/2 |
cA/2>c/2 c/2<e/2A/2>c/2 | df/2<a/2 ec/2<A/2 | c/2<e/2A/2<c/2 cA/2<c/2 | BG/2>B/2 B/2<e/2d/2>B/2 |
cA/2>c/2 c/2<e/2A/2>c/2 | df/2<a/2 ec/2<A/2 | c/2>d/2e/2>A/2 c/2>B/2d/2<G/2 | BA A ||
|: c/2>d/2 | ea ag/2>f/2 | eA ce | df/2>d/2 c/2<A/2e/2>c/2 | B/2<G/2B/2>c/2 [1 dc/2>d/2 |
ea ag/2>f/2 | eA cd | c/2>d/2e/2>A/2 c/2>B/2d/2<G/2 | BA A :|
[2 d/2>f/2e/2>c/2 | d/2>c/2B/2>c/2 A/2>B/2c/2>d/2 | e/2>A/2c/2<e/2 fe/2>d/2 | c/2>d/2e/2>A/2 c/2>B/2d/2<G/2 | BA A ||

Seven comments

John MacDonald of Glencoe

4-part pipe march - one of my favourites and quite well known i think. Written by Pipe Major William Lawrie, the famous piper and composer.

John MacDonald Of Glencoe

Yes, this is one of the all time greats of 2/4 marches. A beauty to say the least.

John MacDonald Of Glencoe

My goodness, mate, this tune is amazing!! It’s so fast!!

John MacDonald Of Glencoe

It shouldn’t be played fast. MacSgianMhor has listed it as a polka because that way the notation comes out like a 2/4 march. Think of it more as a barndance, emphasizing the heavy doted rhythm. If you happen to be unfamiliar with 2/4 pipe marches then it’s pretty vital to listen before learning.

John MacDonald Of Glencoe

Here’s a pretty decent example of the tune being played that I found on youtube. Maybe a bit heavier than you would play in company but it should give you you a fair idea of how the tune goes http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFz5ym-TX-8

John MacDonald Of Glencoe

There’s actually one crucial mistake in the notation here in the 2nd and 6th bars of the first part. The first note should be cut and the second doted. I know it seems trivial but it’s not.