Eight Men Of Moidart polka

Also known as The Eight Men Of Moidart.

There are 2 recordings of this tune.

Eight Men Of Moidart has been added to 17 tunebooks.

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Two settings

1
X: 1
T: Eight Men Of Moidart
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Dmaj
|:A/2d/|f/e/d/c/ dA|F2 DA|F/G/A DA|FE E A/2d/2|
f/e/d/c/ dA|F2 DA|F/G/A EA|FD D:|
|:A/G/|FD AD|BD AD|FD AD|B/A/G/F/ E A/G/|
FD AD|BD AD|F/G/A E>A|FD D:|
2
X: 2
T: Eight Men Of Moidart
R: polka
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: Gmaj
g2 dc | B2 Gc | B/c/d GB | cA Af | g2 dc | B2 Gc | B/c/d Ac | 1 BG Gf :|| 2 BG Gd/c/ ||
BG dG | eG dG | Bd e/d/c/B/ | cA Ad/c/ | BG dG | eG dG | B/c/d Ac | BG Gc |
BG dG | eG dG | Bd dc/B/ | cA Ac | Bd cB | cd ef | gd ec | BG G2 ||
# Added by hetty .

Eight comments

Eight Men of Moidart

A great "driving" dance tune; almost in the style of a Kerry polka - except that this particular tune is Scottish in origin.

(Moidart is a highland region of Scotland - the area north of Loch Shiel and East of the Road to the Isles).

But who were these "eight men" of Moidart? Legend has it that they were fishermen who danced an eightsome reel on the beach, after they observed the landing of Bonnie Prince Charlie in 1745. According to the story, there were only seven fishermen, so they used a spade placed in the sand to act as the eighth dancer.

Note that the last two bars of the "A" part are identical to the last two bars of the "B" part, except that the quaver pair in the penultimate bar of the "B" part is swung, to emphasise the ending of the tune.

Eight Men of Moidart - Painting

That’s all very well but you’d have to be a lunatic to dance in your pants in Moidart. The midges there are legendary. Mind you, sane folk in Moidart are few and far between.

Bogman - if you look at the painting, you’ll notice that none of the dancers is taking any notice of the ship, and in any case, it’s too far away to be able to tell who is on board.

So maybe they’re just dancing just to shake off those pesky midges … 😉

Eight Men of Moidart - another explanation

It is also said that the "eight men" refers to Bonnie Prince Charlie and the seven companions who sailed with him:

1) William Murray, Marquis of Tullibardine, who had taken part in the first uprising in 1715.

2) Colonel Francis Strickland, of an old Westmorland Jacobite family.

3) Aeneas McDonald, who had been a banker in Paris.

4) Sir John McDonald (a relative of Aeneas McDonald)

5) Sir Thomas Sheridan, a veteran of the Battle of the Boyne.

6) Colonel John William O’Sullivan, an Irishman who had served in the French army.

7) George Kelly, an irish priest.

Welcome to the Town Again

Hi mix! You just might like to contemplate the following. You might already have come across it.
T: Welcome to the Town Again
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
K: G
g2 dc | B2 Gc | B/c/d GB | cA Af | g2 dc | B2 Gc | B/c/d Ac | 1 BG Gf :|| 2 BG Gd/c/ ||
BG dG | eG dG | Bd e/d/c/B/ | cA Ad/c/ | BG dG | eG dG | B/c/d Ac | BG Gc |
BG dG | eG dG | Bd dc/B/ | cA Ac | Bd cB | cd ef | gd ec | BG G2 ||

Cannot remember my source but it was certainly north of England. possibly Northumbrian. I play it like a steady March (Gay Gordons tempo) and use it in conjunction with ‘Dear Tobacco’ and ‘Holme’s Fancy’ (in that order) for the dance- "The English Gay Gordons"

Interesting similarities! don’t you think?

Posted by .

What a great supply of notes. Excellent. Lets have more of this.
ME I’m torn between the spade (Ive seen it done) and the 8 in a boat.
Great stuff.
Peter